Academic genealogy of computer scientists

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The following is an academic genealogy of computer scientists and is constructed by following the pedigree of thesis advisors.

Europe[edit]

Denmark[edit]

Finland[edit]

France[edit]

Many French computer scientists worked at the National Institute for Research in Computer Science and Control (INRIA).

Germany[edit]

Italy[edit]

Netherlands[edit]

Van Wijngaarden / Dijkstra[edit]

Adriaan van Wijngaarden was director of the computer science department at the Centrum Wiskunde & Informatica. It was influential in the development of ALGOL 68.

Brouwer / Van Dalen[edit]

Several of the students of Dirk van Dalen, a descendant of Brouwer, became the first Dutch theoretical computer scientists, which still has a strong focus on lambda calculus, rewrite systems and functional programming.

  • Luitzen Egbertus Jan Brouwer (1907: Over de grondslagen der wiskunde. Universiteit van Amsterdam)
    • Arend Heyting (1925: Intuitionistische axiomatiek der projectieve meetkunde. Universiteit van Amsterdam)
      • Dirk van Dalen (1963: Extension Problems in Intuitionistic Plane Projective Geometry. Universiteit van Amsterdam)
        • Henk Barendregt (1971: Some Extensional Terms for Combinatory Logics and Lambda-Calculi. Universiteit Utrecht)
        • Jan van Leeuwen (1972: Rule-Labeled Programs: A Study of a Generalization of Context-Free Grammars and Some Classes of Formal Languages. Universiteit Utrecht)
          • Mark Overmars (1983: The Design of Dynamic Data Structures. Universiteit Utrecht)
            • Mark de Berg (1992: Efficient Algorithms for Ray Shooting and Hidden Surface Removal. Universiteit Utrecht)
            • Marc van Kreveld (1992: New Results on Data Structures in Computational Geometry. Universiteit Utrecht)
          • Hans Bodlaender (1986: Distributed Computing - Structure and Complexity. Universiteit Utrecht)
          • Harry Wijshoff (1987: Data Organization in Parallel Computers. Universiteit Utrecht)
          • Gerard Tel (1989: The Structure of Distributed Algorithms. Universiteit Utrecht)
        • Jan Bergstra (1976: Computability and Continuity in Finite Types. Universiteit Utrecht)
          • Frits Vaandrager (1990: Algebraic Techniques for Concurrency and Their Application. Universiteit van Amsterdam)
          • Linda van der Gaag (1990: Probability-Based Models for Plausible Reasoning. Universiteit van Amsterdam)
          • Chris Verhoef (1990: Linear unary operators in process algebra. Universiteit van Amsterdam)
          • Jan Friso Groote (1991: Process Algebra and Structured Operational Semantics. Universiteit van Amsterdam)
          • Wan Fokkink (1994: Clocks, Trees and Stars in Process Theory. Universiteit van Amsterdam)
          • Jaco van de Pol (1996: Termination of Higher-Order Rewrite Systems. Universiteit Utrecht) (Secondary advisor: Marc Bezem)
        • Jan Willem Klop (1980: Combinatory reduction systems. Universiteit Utrecht)
          • Vincent van Oostrom (1994: Confluence for Abstract and Higher-Order Rewriting. Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam)
        • Albert Visser (1981: Aspects of Diagonalization & Provability. Universiteit Utrecht)
        • Wim Ruitenburg (1982: Intuitionistic Algebra, Theory and Sheaf Models. Universiteit Utrecht)
        • Catholijn Jonker (1994: Constraints and Negations in Logic Programming. Universiteit Utrecht) (Secondary advisor: Jan van Leeuwen)
      • Anne Sjerp Troelstra (1966: Intuitionistic General Topology. Universiteit van Amsterdam)
        • Gerard R. Renardel de Lavalette (1985: Theories with Type-free Application and Extended Bar Induction. Universiteit van Amsterdam)
        • Ieke Moerdijk (1985: Topics in Intuitionism and Topos Theory. Universiteit van Amsterdam)
        • Marc Bezem (1986: Bar recursion and functionals of finite type. Universiteit Utrecht) (Secondary advisor: Dirk van Dalen)

Norway[edit]

Poland[edit]

Sweden[edit]

United Kingdom[edit]

Edinburgh[edit]

Rod Burstall was one of the founders of the Laboratory for Foundations of Computer Science at the University of Edinburgh.

Cambridge[edit]

Maurice Wilkes was the first head of the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory

Robin Milner never did a Ph.D.

Oxford[edit]

Christopher Strachey was the first Professor of Computation at Oxford.

Tony Hoare established the undergraduate computer science course and led the Oxford University Computing Laboratory for many years.

Warwick[edit]

North America[edit]

Church[edit]

Harvard[edit]

Hopcroft / Lefschetz[edit]

California Institute of Technology[edit]

Knuth[edit]

Hartmanis[edit]

Floyd[edit]

Bob Floyd never received a PhD, although he worked closely with Donald Knuth on The Art of Computer Programming.

Ullman[edit]

Hilbert[edit]

Aiken[edit]

Stanford[edit]

Other[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]