Academy of Art University

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Academy of Art University
AcademyArtUnivLogo.png
Motto Built by artists for artists
Established 1929
Type for-profit
President Elisa Stephens
Students 18,000+
Undergraduates 11,992[1]
Postgraduates 6070[2]
Location San Francisco, California, United States
Campus Urban and online
Colors Black and Red         
Athletics NCAA Division II for cross country, soccer, volleyball, basketball, baseball, softball, golf, tennis, track and field
Website www.academyart.edu
Academy logo

The Academy of Art University, formerly Academy of Art College, is a privately owned for-profit art school in San Francisco, California, USA. It was founded by Richard S. Stephens in 1929, and is now owned by the Stephens Institute. It has over 18,000 students, and claims to be the largest privately owned art and design school in the United States.[3] It is one of the largest property owners in San Francisco.[4]

Courses[edit]

The school offers associate, bachelor's[1] and master's degrees in numerous subjects.[2]

Actress Diane Baker heads the school's acting program.[5]

Athletics[edit]

The school sports teams, the Urban Knights, compete as members of the Pacific West Conference in nine sports in NCAA Division II.[citation needed]

Accreditation[edit]

Academy of Art University received regional accreditation from the Western Association of Schools and Colleges in 2007.[6] The school is an accredited institutional member of the National Association of Schools of Art and Design.[7] In interior architecture and design, the Bachelor of Fine Arts degree (taught or online) and Master of Fine Arts degree are both accredited by the Council for Interior Design Accreditation.[8] The Master of Architecture degree has since 2006 been accredited by the National Architectural Accrediting Board.[9]

Alumni[edit]

Alumni of the school include:

Staff[edit]

Past and present staff of the school include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Home: College Search: Academy of Art University. Peterson's. Accessed January 2014.
  2. ^ a b Home: Graduate Schools: Academy of Art University. Peterson's. Accessed January 2014.
  3. ^ "Who We Are". Academy of Art University website. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  4. ^ John Cote (November 15, 2010). "Academy of Art land use violations ignored". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  5. ^ a b Susan King (August 26, 2009). "For Diane Baker, one scene leads to 50 years". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  6. ^ "Statement of accreditation status: Academy of Art University.". Accrediting Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities, Western Association of Schools and Colleges. July 19, 2007. Retrieved January 2014. 
  7. ^ "Accredited Institutional Members". National Association of Schools of Art and Design. 2014. Retrieved January 2014. 
  8. ^ "Accredited Program History". Council for Interior Design Accreditation. Retrieved July 15, 2012. 
  9. ^ "Architecture programs: Academy of Art University". National Architectural Accrediting Board. 2006. Retrieved January 2014. 
  10. ^ "Artworks of Henry Asencio". Crown Thorn Publishing. Retrieved 24 January 2013. 
  11. ^ a b Katie Baker (November 17, 2009). "Ask The Appeal: Does Academy Of Art University Have Any Notable Alumni?". San Francisco Appeal. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  12. ^ "Chris Milk Official Site". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved May 7, 2008. 
  13. ^ "The 2005 Pulitzer prize winners – feature photography: Deanne Fitzmaurice.". The Pulitzer Prizes, Columbia University. Retrieved December 17, 2006. 
  14. ^ Dunhill, Heather. "Qs for Fashion Star's Kara Larick". Heather Dunhill's Fashion IQ. Sarasota Magazine. Retrieved May 17, 2012. 
  15. ^ Sarah Gish (March 20, 2012). "My essentials: Kara Laricks of ‘Fashion Star’". Ink Magazine. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  16. ^ "2009 Sonoma International Film Festival". ScreenDaily. Retrieved March 28, 2009. 
  17. ^ "Sonoma Film Festival Selections". indiewire.com. Retrieved March 29, 2009. 
  18. ^ "Lauren Conrad Biography". People Magazine. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  19. ^ "Heidi Montag". People Magazine. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  20. ^ Peter Hartlaub (July 22, 2010). "Yanehiro, Hart now at Academy of Art in S.F.". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  21. ^ Josh Flynn (December 28, 2010). "Ready to Win". Slam Online. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 
  22. ^ "Artist Interview with Terryl Whitlatch". Copic. March 15, 2011. Retrieved October 16, 2013. 

Coordinates: 37°47′16″N 122°24′02″W / 37.78785°N 122.40065°W / 37.78785; -122.40065