Accomack County Airport

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Accomack County Airport
Accomack County Airport - VA - 20 Mar 1994 - USGS.jpg
1995 USGS Photo
IATA: MFVICAO: KMFV
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner Accomack County Airport Commission
Location Accomack County (near Melfa), Virginia, U.S.
Elevation AMSL 47 ft / 14 m
Coordinates 37°38′48″N 075°45′39″W / 37.64667°N 75.76083°W / 37.64667; -75.76083Coordinates: 37°38′48″N 075°45′39″W / 37.64667°N 75.76083°W / 37.64667; -75.76083
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
03/21 5,000 1,524 Asphalt
Statistics (2008)
Aircraft operations 14,056
Based aircraft 23
Source: Federal Aviation Administration[1]

Accomack County Airport (IATA: MFVICAO: KMFV) is a county-owned public-use airport located 1 mile (1.6 km) west of the central business district of Melfa, a city in Accomack County, Virginia, United States.[1]

History[edit]

The airport was built by the United States Army Air Forces about 1942, and was known as Melfa Flight Strip. It was an emergency landing airfield for military aircraft on training flights. It was closed after World War II, and was turned over for local government use by the War Assets Administration (WAA).[citation needed]

Facilities and aircraft[edit]

Accomack County Airport covers an area of 100 acres which contains one runway designated 3/21 with a 5,000 x 100 ft (1,524 x 30 m) asphalt surface. For the 12-month period ending September 30, 2009, the airport had 14,056 aircraft operations, an average of 38 per day: 84% general aviation and 8% air taxi and 9% military. At that time there were 23 aircraft based at this airport: 22 single-engine and 1 multi-engine.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c FAA Airport Master Record for MFV (Form 5010 PDF), effective 2009-09-30

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Air Force Historical Research Agency.

  • Shaw, Frederick J. (2004), Locating Air Force Base Sites History’s Legacy, Air Force History and Museums Program, United States Air Force, Washington DC, 2004.

External links[edit]