Ace of hearts (card)

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For other uses, see Ace of hearts.
Ace of hearts
Ruth Roland on the Ace of hearts from a 1916 deck.

The Ace of hearts (A♥) is a card in a deck of playing cards: the ace in the suit of hearts (♥).

There is one Ace of hearts in a standard deck of 52 cards.

In games[edit]

In the 17th century French game Le Jeu de la Guerre, the Ace of hearts represented the cavalry.[1]

In the game Bankafalet, the second best card in the deck is the Ace of hearts.[2]

In the Irish game Five Cards, the Ace of hearts is the second highest card in the pack, below the five fingers (aka five of trumps).[3]

In literature[edit]

American author Zane Grey used the cartomantic meaning of playing cards in his novels. For example, in his book The Border Legion, he describes the character Joan Randle as an Ace of Hearts, after she "outwit[s] and outtalk[s] her would-be-seducer, outlaw Kells".[4] The very same card is pinned by Kells to a tree, where he shoots at with many bullets, "every one of which touch[ing] the red heart and one of them...obliterat[ing] it",[5] and then signs his name below. This foreshadows the climax described above. These uses of the Ace of hearts by Grey utilize the many symbolic meanings of the card including intimidation, eroticism, and death.[4]

Referring to the Jesuits, the author of "The true history of Pope Joan" says: "a certain prince of ours did compare unto them a game of cardes, in which the gamesters like loadem play and bring them forth last that are of most price,to beat downe the adverse play: or like the ace of hearts at Mawe (the game which is with us called Rumstich)". This is said to provide the answer to the origin of the card game Mawe.[6]

Card reading[edit]

The Ace of hearts card is very rare. It represents passion/love and also success in business or finance. People who receive the Ace of hearts enjoy luxury objects. Ace of hearts "gravitate to strong independent women". They are also "romantic and passionate by nature".[7] While the Ace represents independence and a desire to lead, the hearts represents the season of Spring.[8] As the heart signifies emotion, any heart card has a bearing on one's closest relationships (mother-son, husband-wife etc.).[7] Although the meaning of the card is "the "desire for love", it can also represent the desire for money due to the Ace of Diamonds Karma Card.[9] In fortune telling, the card has been known to represent love and happiness.[7][10]

In Reverend Edwards Taylor's book "History of Playing Cards", he talks about a unique pack of cards that were "probably issued immediately after the Restoration". On these cards, the pips were French, and the figures were imitations of the Atouts. The Ace of Hearts had a figure of Hermes Trismegistus.[11]

The Lenormand oracle decks were favourites throughout Europe. Each card had a meaningless picture on it, and a male or female figure dressed in 1850s fashion. If the inquirer is male, he is represented by the Ace of hearts. It, along with the Ace of Spades (representing a female), can also represent spouses or lovers. These two cards dominate and control the rest.[12] When a man is the inquirer, the cards are read by counting how near or far the are to the Ace of hearts, and using this method to deduce which of the Tarot card's 4 meanings are used.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Singer, Samuel Weller (1816). Researches into the history of playing cards; with illustrations of the origin of printing and engraving on wood. T. Bensley and Son. pp. 233–4. Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  2. ^ Singer, Samuel Weller (1816). Researches into the history of playing cards; with illustrations of the origin of printing and engraving on wood. T. Bensley and Son. p. 348. Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  3. ^ Singer, Samuel Weller (1816). Researches into the history of playing cards; with illustrations of the origin of printing and engraving on wood. T. Bensley and Son. p. 340. Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Kimball, Arthur G. (1993). Ace of Hearts: The Westerns of Zane Grey. p. 92. Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  5. ^ Kimball, Arthur G. (1993). Ace of Hearts: The Westerns of Zane Grey. p. 116. Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  6. ^ Singer, Samuel Weller (1816). Researches into the history of playing cards; with illustrations of the origin of printing and engraving on wood. T. Bensley and Son. pp. 258–9. Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  7. ^ a b c "Ace Of Hearts Birth Card". Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  8. ^ "What does the ace of hearts in a deck of cards represent?". Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  9. ^ "The Ace of Hearts Person The Search for Love Card". Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  10. ^ "Fortune Telling Playing Cards". Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  11. ^ Prophetical, Educational and Playing Cards. Van Rensselaer, Mrs John King. 1912. p. 71. Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  12. ^ Prophetical, Educational and Playing Cards. Van Rensselaer, Mrs John King. 1912. pp. 368–9. Retrieved April 16, 2012. 
  13. ^ Prophetical, Educational and Playing Cards. Van Rensselaer, Mrs John King. 1912. p. 372. Retrieved April 16, 2012. 

External links[edit]

Spirituality