Acenaphthylene

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Acenaphthylene
Skeletal formula Space-filling model
Identifiers
CAS number 208-96-8 YesY
PubChem 9161
ChemSpider 8807 YesY
UNII 1Z25C36811 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:33081 YesY
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Image 2
Properties
Molecular formula C12H8
Molar mass 152.19 g mol−1
Appearance Yellow crystals
Density 0.8987 g cm-3
Melting point 91.8 °C (197.2 °F; 364.9 K)
Boiling point 280 °C (536 °F; 553 K)
Solubility in water Insoluble
Solubility in ethanol very soluble
Solubility in diethyl ether very soluble
Solubility in benzene very soluble
Solubility in chloroform soluble
Hazards
MSDS MSDS
R-phrases R22 R36 R37 R38
S-phrases S26 S36 S37 S39
Flash point  ?°C
Related compounds
Related compounds acenaphthene
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
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Infobox references

Acenaphthylene is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon. The molecule resembles naphthalene with positions 1 and 8 connected by a C2H2 unit. It is a yellow solid. Unlike many polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, it has no fluorescence.

Occurrence[edit]

Acenaphthylene occurs as about 2% of coal tar. It is produced industrially by dehydrogenation of acenaphthene.[1] More than 20% of the carbon in the universe may be associated with PAHs.[2]

Reactions[edit]

Hydrogenation gives the more saturated compound acenaphthene.

It functions as a ligand for some organometallic compounds.[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Karl Griesbaum, Arno Behr, Dieter Biedenkapp, Heinz-Werner Voges, Dorothea Garbe, Christian Paetz, Gerd Collin, Dieter Mayer, Hartmut Höke “Hydrocarbons” in Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry 2002 Wiley-VCH, Weinheim. doi:10.1002/14356007.a13_227
  2. ^ Hoover, Rachel (February 21, 2014). "Need to Track Organic Nano-Particles Across the Universe? NASA's Got an App for That". NASA. Retrieved February 22, 2014. 
  3. ^ Yukihiro Motoyama, Chikara Itonaga, Toshiki Ishida, Mikihiro Takasaki, and Hideo Nagashima (1925), "Catalytic Reduction of Amides to Amines with Hydrosilanes Using a Triruthenium Cluster as the Catalyst", Org. Synth. 82: 188 ; Coll. Vol. 11: 1