Acestorides

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Acestorides (Greek Ακεστορίδης) is the name of several people from Classical history:

  • Acestorides of Corinth (fl. 4th century BC) was a native of Corinth who was made supreme commander of Syracuse by the citizens of the Sicilian polis of Syracuse in 320 BC and was able to banish the tyrant Agathocles from the city.[1][2] Acestorides then left Syracuse in 319 BC and Sostratus became the leader of the city until Agathocles recaptured the city in 317 BC.[3]
  • Another Acestorides, whose date is unknown, wrote four books of mythical stories relating to every city (των κατά πόλιν μυθικων). In these he gave many real historical accounts, as well as those merely fantastical, but he entitled them μυθικά ("myths") to avoid calumny and to indicate the pleasant nature of the work. It was compiled from Conon, Apollodorus, Protagoras and others.[2][4][5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Diodorus, xix. 5, p. 12
  2. ^ a b Smith, William (1867), "Acestorides (1) and (2)", in Smith, William, Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology 1, Boston, pp. 7–8 
  3. ^ http://www.attalus.org/names/a/acestorides.html; viewed 15 January 2010
  4. ^ Phot. Bibl. cod. 189
  5. ^ John Tzetzes, Chiliades vii. 144


 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSmith, William, ed. (1870). "Acestorides (writer)". Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology.