Achelata

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Achelata
Temporal range: Upper Jurassic – Recent
The phyllosoma larva is characteristic of the Achelata
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Crustacea
Class: Malacostraca
Order: Decapoda
Infraorder: Achelata
Scholtz & Richter, 1995
Families [1]

The Achelata is an infra-order of the decapod crustaceans, holding the spiny lobsters, slipper lobsters and their fossil relatives.

Description[edit]

The name "Achelata" derives from the fact that all the members of this group lack the chelae (claws) that are found on almost all other decapods (from the Greek α-, a- = "not", χηλή, chela = "claw"). They are further united by the great enlargement of the first antennae, by the special "phyllosoma" form of the larva, and by a number of other characters.[2]

Classification and fossil record[edit]

Achelata contains the spiny lobsters (Palinuridae), the slipper lobsters (Scyllaridae) and the furry lobsters (Synaxidae, now usually included in Palinuridae),[3] as well as two extinct families, Cancrinidae and Tricarinidae.[1]

Both Palinuridae and Scyllaridae have a fossil record extending back to the Cretaceous.[4][5] The two fossil families contain a single genus each;[1] Tricarina is known from a single Cretaceous fossil,[6] while Cancrinos is known from the Jurassic and Cretaceous.[5] One estimate of the divergence between Achelata and its closest relatives places it at about 341 million years ago.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Sammy De Grave, N. Dean Pentcheff, Shane T. Ahyong et al. (2009). "A classification of living and fossil genera of decapod crustaceans" (PDF). Raffles Bulletin of Zoology. Suppl. 21: 1–109. 
  2. ^ Gerhard Scholtz & Stefan Richter (1995). "Phylogenetic systematics of the reptantian Decapoda (Crustacea, Malacostraca)" (PDF). Zoological Journal of the Linnean Society 113 (3): 289–328. doi:10.1006/zjls.1995.0011. 
  3. ^ Ferran Palero, Keith A. Crandall, Pere Abelló, Enrique Macpherson & Marta Pascual (2009). "Phylogenetic relationships between spiny, slipper and coral lobsters (Crustacea, Decapoda, Achelata)". Molecular Phylogenetics and Evolution 50 (1): 152–162. doi:10.1016/j.ympev.2008.10.003. PMID 18957325. 
  4. ^ Francisco J. Vega, Pedro García-Barrera, María del Carmen Perrilliat, Marco A. Coutiño & Ricardo Mariño-Pérez (2006). "El Espinal, a new plattenkalk facies locality from the Lower Cretaceous Sierra Madre Formation, Chiapas, southeastern Mexico" (PDF). Revista Mexicana de Ciencias Geológicas 23 (3): 323–333. 
  5. ^ a b Joachim T. Haug, Carolin Haug, Dieter Waloszek, Andreas Maas, Matthias Wulf & Günter Schweigert (2009). "Development in Mesozoic scyllarids and implications for the evolution of Achelata (Reptantia, Decapoda, Crustacea)" (PDF). Palaeodiversity 2: 97–110. 
  6. ^ Rodney M. Feldmann, Ali Kolahdouz, Bijan Biranvand & Guenter Schweigert (2007). "A new family, genus, and species of lobster (Decapoda: Achelata) from the Gadvan Formation (Early Cretaceous) of Iran" (PDF). Journal of Paleontology 81 (2): 405–407. doi:10.1666/0022-3360(2007)81[405:ANFGAS]2.0.CO;2. 
  7. ^ Keith A. Crandall, Megan L. Porter & Marcos Pérez-Losada (2009). "Crabs, shrimps and lobsters (Decapoda)". In S. Blair Hedges & Sudhir Kumar. The Timetree of Life. Oxford University Press. pp. 293–297. ISBN 978-0-19-160898-8. 

External links[edit]

  • Media related to Achelata at Wikimedia Commons