Achnasheen railway station

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Achnasheen National Rail
Scottish Gaelic: Achadh na Sìne
Achnasheen
Location
Place Achnasheen
Local authority Highland
Coordinates 57°34′45″N 5°04′20″W / 57.5793°N 5.0723°W / 57.5793; -5.0723Coordinates: 57°34′45″N 5°04′20″W / 57.5793°N 5.0723°W / 57.5793; -5.0723
Grid reference NH164585
Operations
Station code ACN
Managed by First ScotRail
Number of platforms 2
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2004/05  2,379
2005/06 Increase 2,471
2006/07 Increase 2,697
2007/08 Increase 2,974
2008/09 Increase 3,202
2009/10 Increase 3,614
2010/11 Increase 3,698
2011/12 Increase 3,998
2012/13 Decrease 3,566
History
19 August 1870 Station opened[1]
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Achnasheen from Office of Rail Regulation statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.
Portal icon UK Railways portal

Achnasheen railway station is a remote railway station on the Kyle of Lochalsh Line, serving the village of Achnasheen in the north of Scotland.

History[edit]

Loco-hauled trains pass at Achnasheen, September 1973

The station was opened by the Dingwall and Skye Railway on 19 August 1870,[1] but operated from the outset by the Highland Railway. The station hotel was built by Alexander Ross and opened in 1871. It was extended by William Roberts in 1898[2] and again at the turn of the 21st century.

Taken into the London, Midland and Scottish Railway during the Grouping of 1923, the line then passed on to the Scottish Region of British Railways on nationalisation in 1948.

It was once an important railhead, handling passengers, mail and freight bound for parts of Wester Ross, including Gairloch and the Loch Torridon area. All freight in this area now travels by road. The station building still serves as a postal distribution point, but the mail travels from Inverness by road.

When sectorisation was introduced, the station became part of ScotRail until the Privatisation of British Rail.

The station is the location of one of the three passing loops on the line west of Dingwall and trains are sometimes timetabled to cross here. The loop was once controlled from signal boxes at each end of the station (a common method of working on the HR), but both were closed when Radio Electronic Token Block signalling was introduced on the line in 1984. The loop is now supervised remotely from the power box at Inverness.

Services[edit]

There are four trains a day in each direction (one or two on Sundays depending on the time of year) stopping here, connecting Achnasheen with all stations between Inverness and Kyle of Lochalsh, but these are lightly used.

Preceding station National Rail National Rail Following station
Achanalt   First ScotRail
Kyle of Lochalsh Line
  Achnashellach
Historical railways
Achanalt
Line and Station open
  Highland Railway
Dingwall and Skye Railway
  Glencarron Platform
Line open; Station closed

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Butt (1995)
  2. ^ The Buildings of Scotland: Highlands: John Gifford. Yale University Press 2003. ISBN 0300096259 p.380

Sources[edit]