Acid mantle

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The acid mantle is a very fine, slightly acidic film on the surface of the skin acting as a barrier to bacteria, viruses and other potential contaminants that might penetrate the skin.[1] It is secreted by sebaceous glands. The pH of the skin is between 4.5 and 6.2, so it is acidic.[2][3] These contaminants and other chemicals are primarily alkaline in nature and the skin's moderate acidity helps to neutralize their chemical effects.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Monika-Hildegard Schmid-Wendtner; Korting Schmid-Wendtner (2007). Ph and Skin Care. ABW Wissenschaftsverlag. pp. 31–. ISBN 978-3-936072-64-8. Retrieved 19 June 2012. 
  2. ^ Zlotogorski A (1987). "Distribution of skin surface pH on the forehead and cheek of adults". Arch. Dermatol. Res. 279 (6): 398–401. doi:10.1007/bf00412626. PMID 3674963. 
  3. ^ Schmid MH, Korting HC (1995). "The concept of the acid mantle of the skin: its relevance for the choice of skin cleansers". Dermatology (Basel) 191 (4): 276–80. doi:10.1159/000246568. PMID 8573921.