Acorn-class destroyer

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HMS FURY (1911) attending Audacious.jpg
HMS Fury
Class overview
Builders: John Brown and Company
William Denny & Brothers
Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Company
R. W. Hawthorn Leslie & Company
Swan Hunter & Wigham Richardson
A. & J. Inglis
John I. Thornycroft & Company
J. Samuel White & Company
Preceded by: Beagle class
Succeeded by: Acheron class
Built: 1910–1911
In commission: 1910–1921
Completed: 20
Lost: 3
General characteristics
Type: Destroyer
Displacement: 730 to 780 tons
Length: 246 ft 6 in (75.13 m)
Beam: 25 ft 6 in (7.77 m)
Draught: 7 ft (2.1 m)–10 ft (3.0 m)
Propulsion: Oil-fired boilers
3 shaft steam turbines
13,500 shp (10,067 kW)
Speed: 27 knots (50 km/h)
Range: 170 tons oil
Complement: 72
Armament:

2 × BL 4-inch (101.6 mm) L/40 Mark VIII guns, mounting P Mark V

2 × QF 12 pdr 12 cwt Mark I mounting P Mark I
2 × 21 in (533 mm) torpedo tubes
For the World War II H-class destroyers, see H class destroyer (1937)

The Acorn class (officially redesignated the H class in 1913) was a class of twenty destroyers of the Royal Navy all built under the 1909-1910 Programme, and completed between 1910 and 1911. The Acorns served during World War I.

After the coal-burning Beagle or G class of 1909, the Acorns marked a return to oil-firing as pioneered in the Tribal or F class of 1905 and HMS Swift of 1907. This change allowed a generally smaller vessel than the Beagles even with an increase in armament.

The Acorns were, as with previous classes, built to designs by their individual builders, but had a more-or-less uniform appearance, with three funnels, a tall, thin fore funnel, a short, thick central and a short narrow after stack. They had two 4-inch guns on the fo'c'sle - which was higher than that of the Beagles, negating the need for a raised bandstand - and on the quarterdeck. The 12-pounder guns were amidships, on the beams between the first two funnels, and the torpedo tubes were aft of the funnels, mounted singly with a searchlight position between them.

Three ships were lost in wartime service.

Ships[edit]

Fury (dark, centre picture) and Liverpool try to take the sinking battleship Audacious in tow. The view is from the passenger areas of the liner Olympic, 27 October 1914

References[edit]

  • Destroyers of the Royal Navy, 1893-1981, Maurice Cocker, 1983, Ian Allan ISBN 0-7110-1075-7