Acoustic emission

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Acoustic emission (AE) is the sound waves produced when a material undergoes stress (internal change), as a result of an external force.[1] AE is a phenomenon occurring in for instance mechanical loading generating sources of elastic waves. This occurrence is the result of a small surface displacement of a material produced due to stress waves [2] generated when the energy in a material, or on its surface is released rapidly.[3] The wave generated by the source is of practical interest in methods used to stimulate and capture AE in a controlled fashion, for study and/or use in inspection, quality control, system feedback, process monitoring and others.

Acoustic emission phenomena[edit]

AE is commonly defined as transient elastic waves within a material, caused by the release of localized stress energy. Hence, an event source is the phenomenon which releases elastic energy into the material, which then propagates as an elastic wave. Acoustic emissions can be detected in frequency ranges under 1 kHz, and have been reported at frequencies up to 100 MHz, but most of the released energy is within the 1 kHz to 1 MHz range. Rapid stress-releasing events generate a spectrum of stress waves starting at 0 Hz, and typically falling off at several MHz.

The three major applications of AE techniques are: 1) source location - determine the locations where an event source occurred; 2) material mechanical performance - evaluate and characterize materials/structures; and 3) health monitoring - monitor the safety operation of a structure, i.e. bridges, pressure containers, and pipe lines, etc.

AE can be related to an irreversible release of energy. It can also be generated from sources not involving material failure including friction, cavitation and impact.

Uses[edit]

The application of acoustic emission to non-destructive testing of materials, typically takes place between 100 kHz and 1 MHz. Unlike conventional ultrasonic testing, AE tools are designed for monitoring acoustic emissions produced within the material during failure or stress, rather than actively transmitting waves, then collecting them after they have traveled through the material. Part failure can be documented during unattended monitoring. The monitoring of the level of AE activity during multiple load cycles forms the basis for many AE safety inspection methods, that allow the parts undergoing inspection to remain in service.[4]

The technique is used, for example, to study the formation of cracks during the welding process, as opposed to locating them after the weld has been formed with the more familiar ultrasonic testing technique. In a material under active stress, such as some components of an airplane during flight, transducers mounted in an area can detect the formation of a crack at the moment it begins propagating. A group of transducers can be used to record signals, then locate the precise area of their origin by measuring the time for the sound to reach different transducers. The technique is also valuable for detecting cracks forming in pressure vessels [5][6] and pipelines transporting liquids under high pressures. Also, this technique is used for estimation of corrosion in reinforced concrete structures.[4][7]

In addition to non-destructive testing, acoustic emission monitoring has applications in process monitoring. Applications where acoustic emission monitoring has successfully been used include detecting anomalies in fluidized beds, and end points in batch granulation.

Standards for the use of acoustic emission for non-destructive testing of pressure vessels have been developed by the ASME, ISO and the European Community.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Miinshiou Huang, Liang Jiang, Peter K. Liaw, Charlie R. Brooks, Rodger Seeley, and Dwaine L. Klarstrom. tms.org website November 1998 (vol. 50, no. 11) JOM. Retrieved 2011-12-05.
  2. ^ pacuk.co.uk website. Retrieved 2011-12-05.
  3. ^ Sotirios J. Vahaviolos (1999). Acoustic Emission: Standards and Technology Update. STP-1353. Philadelphia, PA: ASTM International (publishing). p. 81. ISBN 0-8031-2498-8. 
  4. ^ a b Blitz, Jack; G. Simpson (1991). Ultrasonic Methods of Non-Destructive Testing. Springer-Verlag New York, LLC. ISBN 978-0-412-60470-6. 
  5. ^ Stuart Hewerdine, ed. (1993). Plant Integrity Assessment by Acoustic Emission Testing (2 ed.). Rugby, UK: Institution of Chemical Engineers. ISBN 0-85295-316-X. 
  6. ^ A. A. Anastasopoulos, D. A. Kourousis, P.T. Cole (October 2008). "Acoustic Emission Inspection of Spherical Metallic Pressure Vessels". The 2nd International Conference on Technical Inspection and NDT (TINDT2008). Tehran, Iran. 
  7. ^ Estimation of corrosion in reinforced concrete by electrochemical techniques and acoustic emission, journal of advanced concrete technology, vol. 3, No 1, 137-144, February 2005

External links and further reading[edit]