Action of 3 June 2007

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Action of 3 June 2007
Part of the Operation Enduring Freedom - Horn of Africa
US Navy 071007-N-4014G-055 Dock landing ship USS Carter Hall (LSD 50) approaches Military Sealift Command fleet replenishment oiler USNS Tippecanoe (T-AO 199) for an underway replenishment.jpg
USS Carter Hall
Date 3 June 2007
Location off Somalia coast
Result Indecisive, ship released after negotiation.
Belligerents
 United States Somali Pirates
Strength
1 Dock landing ship 1 freighter
3 Skiffs
Casualties and losses
none 3 skiffs sunk

The Action of 3 June 2007 occurred after a United States Navy dock landing ship attacked pirates hijacking a freighter.

Background[edit]

The rise of the Islamic Courts Union in Somalia had stopped the spread of piracy in the region with its following of strict Islamic law punishing pirates harshly. When the Ethiopian and Somali government forces overran the ICU, a lack of strict enforcement allowed the pirates to rebound and once again prey upon shipping in the region by early 2007.

Events[edit]

The USS Carter Hall responded to a distress call after the capture of the Danish ship Danica White by pirates. Three pirate skiffs had boarded and seized the vessel. The Carter Hall ordered the pirates to cease and desist but was ignored. She then began to fire warning shots with small arms across the bow of the Danica White to no avail. The pirates merely continued on their course and ignored the US Naval vessel. The Carter Hall then opened fire upon the pirate skiffs using her 25 mm cannon as well as smaller caliber guns. After setting the three skiffs alight and destroying them, the pirates fled into Somali territorial waters, preventing the American vessel from giving further chase, as they no longer had the authority to do so under international law. After much negotiation the pirates finally released the ship and crew to the Commandant Blaison (F793) and the Lamotte-Picquet (D645) on 22 August 2007.[1] The pirates had demanded 1.5 million dollars ransom in exchange for the release, but it is unclear what amount was actually paid. The crew returned home safely to Denmark on the twenty-eighth after 83 days of captivity.

References[edit]