Ada, Ohio

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Ada, Ohio
Village
Along State Route 235 in Ada
Along State Route 235 in Ada
Location of Ada, Ohio
Location of Ada, Ohio
Coordinates: 40°46′8″N 83°49′20″W / 40.76889°N 83.82222°W / 40.76889; -83.82222Coordinates: 40°46′8″N 83°49′20″W / 40.76889°N 83.82222°W / 40.76889; -83.82222
Country United States
State Ohio
County Hardin
Government
 • Mayor Dave Retterer
Area[1]
 • Total 2.08 sq mi (5.39 km2)
 • Land 2.08 sq mi (5.39 km2)
 • Water 0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation [2] 958 ft (292 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 5,952
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 5,804
 • Density 2,861.5/sq mi (1,104.8/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 45810
Area code(s) 419
FIPS code 39-00198[5]
GNIS feature ID 1064295[2]
Website Ada Ohio Town Website

Ada /ˈdə/[6] is a village in Hardin County, Ohio, United States. The 2010 census counted 5,952 people.[7] It is the home of Ohio Northern University.

History[edit]

Ada was founded in 1853 by S. M. Johnson.[8] The town was named after the postmaster's daughter, Ada.[9]

Geography[edit]

Ada is located at 40°46′8″N 83°49′20″W / 40.76889°N 83.82222°W / 40.76889; -83.82222 (40.768883, -83.822298).[10]

According to the 2010 census, the village has a total area of 2.08 square miles (5.4 km2), all land.[11] The area surrounding the village is mostly farmland and small plots of forest. Hog Creek is the only waterway of note and snakes around the village to the north and the east.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 1,760
1890 2,079 18.1%
1900 2,576 23.9%
1910 2,465 −4.3%
1920 2,321 −5.8%
1930 2,499 7.7%
1940 2,368 −5.2%
1950 3,640 53.7%
1960 3,918 7.6%
1970 5,309 35.5%
1980 5,669 6.8%
1990 5,413 −4.5%
2000 5,582 3.1%
2010 5,952 6.6%
Est. 2012 5,804 −2.5%
Sources:[12][13][14][15][16][5][17]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 5,952 people, 1,729 households, and 846 families residing in the village. The population density was 2,861.5 inhabitants per square mile (1,104.8 /km2). There were 1,910 housing units at an average density of 918.3 per square mile (354.6 /km2). The racial makeup of the village was 93.5% White, 1.9% African American, 0.1% Native American, 1.9% Asian, 0.7% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.6% of the population.

There were 1,729 households of which 24.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.7% were married couples living together, 8.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 51.1% were non-families. 38.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.26 and the average family size was 3.01.

The median age in the village was 22.2 years. 13.6% of residents were under the age of 18; 49.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 17.2% were from 25 to 44; 13.5% were from 45 to 64; and 6.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 50.8% male and 49.2% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 5,582 people, 1,783 households, and 850 families residing in the village. The population density was 2,982.7 people per square mile (1,152.5/km²). There were 1,948 housing units at an average density of 1,040.9 per square mile (402.2/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 95.50% White, 1.58% African American, 0.13% Native American, 1.25% Asian, 0.30% from other races, and 1.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.59% of the population.

There were 1,783 households, out of which 22.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 37.6% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 52.3% were non-families. 36.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.22 and the average family size was 2.92.

In the village the population was spread out, with 13.9% under the age of 18, 48.6% from 18 to 24, 18.0% from 25 to 44, 12.5% from 45 to 64, and 7.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 22 years. For every 100 females there were 96.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.4 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $24,665, and the median income for a family was $39,300. Males had a median income of $32,143 versus $23,750 for females. The per capita income for the village was $12,561. About 11.7% of families and 21.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.9% of those under age 18 and 19.4% of those age 65 or over.

Education[edit]

Public Schools[edit]

Ada Exempted Village Public School houses grades K-12 and most of the administration.[18] The district spends $7,701 per student annually ($925 lower than the state average).[19]

Ada High School's sports teams participate in the Northwest Conference — an athletic body sanctioned by the Ohio High School Athletic Association (OHSAA) — which includes the Ada Bulldogs, Allen East Mustangs, Bluffton Pirates, Columbus Grove Bulldogs, Convoy Crestview Knights, Delphos Jefferson Wildcats, Lima Central Catholic T-Birds, Lincolnview Lancers, Paulding Panthers, and Spencerville Bearcats.

College education[edit]

Ada is the home of Ohio Northern University, a private University comprising five colleges: Arts and Sciences, Business Administration, Engineering, Pharmacy, and Law.[20]

Media[edit]

Two media outlets currently operate in the Village of Ada. The Ada Herald is a weekly newspaper, and WONB, the radio station at Ohio Northern University.

Infrastructure[edit]

Transportation[edit]

Ada Airport (FAA LID: 0D7) is a privately owned, public-use airport located one nautical mile (1.85 km) northwest of the central business district of Ada.

Notable residents[edit]

Rollo May, an American existential psychologist.

Lee Tressel, Father of former Ohio State University Football Coach Jim Tressel.

John Berton, award-winning computer graphics animator and visual effects supervisor.

Jonathan Haslop, Decorated Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom veteran

Zac Dysert Current Quarterback for the Denver Broncos of the NFL

Town information[edit]

The Wilson Sporting Goods NFL football manufacturing facility is located in Ada, and is the only leather football manufacturing facility in the United States.[21]

The National Arbor Day Foundation has qualified Ada as a Tree City USA.

In 1817, The Ohio Shawnee Native American tribe signed the Treaty of Fort Meigs to receive reservation land at Hog Creek near Ada.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  2. ^ a b "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-01-06. 
  4. ^ "Population Estimates". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2013-06-17. 
  5. ^ a b c "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  6. ^ http://scrippsjschool.org/pronunciation/
  7. ^ "2010 Census Redistricting Data (Public Law 94-171) Summary File". Retrieved 2011-03-18. 
  8. ^ "Ada.Net". Ada.Net. Retrieved 2012-05-07. 
  9. ^ "Profile for Ada, Ohio, OH". ePodunk. Retrieved 2012-05-07. 
  10. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  11. ^ "2010 Census U.S. Gazetteer Files for Places – Ohio". United States Census. Retrieved 2012-10-19. 
  12. ^ "Population of Civil Divisions Less than Counties". Statistics of the Population of the United States at the Tenth Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  13. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1910 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  14. ^ "Population: Ohio". 1930 US Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 28 November 2013. 
  15. ^ "Number of Inhabitants: Ohio". 18th Census of the United States. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  16. ^ "Ohio: Population and Housing Unit Counts". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 22 November 2013. 
  17. ^ "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 25 November 2013. 
  18. ^ http://ada.k12.oh.us/
  19. ^ http://www.publicschoolreview.com/school_ov/school_id/63178
  20. ^ "Ohio Northern University". Ohio Northern University. Retrieved 2012-05-07. 
  21. ^ Thomas, Katie (2008-02-02). "At a Small Ohio Factory, Leather and Laces Mesh". New York Times. Retrieved 2008-09-02. 

External links[edit]