Adak Airport

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Adak Airport
IATA: ADKICAO: PADKFAA LID: ADK
Summary
Airport type Public
Owner Alaska DOT&PF - Central Region
Serves Adak Island, Alaska
Location Adak, Alaska
Elevation AMSL 18 ft / 5 m
Coordinates 51°52′41″N 176°38′46″W / 51.87806°N 176.64611°W / 51.87806; -176.64611Coordinates: 51°52′41″N 176°38′46″W / 51.87806°N 176.64611°W / 51.87806; -176.64611
Map
ADK is located in Alaska
ADK
ADK
Location of airport in Alaska
Runways
Direction Length Surface
ft m
5/23 7,790 2,374 Asphalt
18/36 7,605 2,318 Asphalt
Statistics (2011)
Aircraft operations 340
Source: Federal Aviation Administration[1]
Adak/Longview AAF, September 1942

Adak Airport (IATA: ADKICAO: PADKFAA LID: ADK) is a state owned, public use airport located west of Adak, on Adak Island in the U.S. state of Alaska.[1] The airport is the farthest west for the entire United States at 176.64W.

Adak's airport is one of the largest and most sophisticated airports in the Aleutian Islands. Built by the U.S. Navy for Naval air transport, the airport is a world-class facility consisting of a 7,800-foot (2,400 m) runway and a 7,600-foot (2,300 m) runway, equipped with an Instrument Landing System and glideslope which facilitate Instrument Flight Rules landings. Adak currently has scheduled jet service provided by Alaska Airlines.

As per Federal Aviation Administration records, the airport had 1,989 passenger boardings (enplanements) in calendar year 2008,[2] 1,907 enplanements in 2009, and 2,097 in 2010.[3] It is included in the National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems for 2011–2015, which categorized it as a general aviation facility (the commercial service category requires at least 2,500 enplanements per year).[4]

History[edit]

The military first developed an air station on Adak during World War II. Adak Army Airfield was used during the Aleutian Campaign by both USAAF and Naval Air units.

Following the war, the AAF turned Adak over to the Navy who established anti-submarine warfare base there. Adak was most recently run by the U.S. Navy as a deployment base for P-3 Orion maritime patrol aircraft, primarily to conduct antisubmarine warfare operations against submarines and surveillance of naval surface vessels of the former Soviet Union. On 31 March 1997, the Navy closed Adak Naval Air Facility.

Once an American Airlines Boeing 777-200 from Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport en route to Tokyo Narita diverted to Adak Airport due to a fire warning in the cargo hold.[citation needed]

Facilities and aircraft[edit]

Adak Airport resides at elevation of 18 feet (5 m) above mean sea level. It has two runways with asphalt surfaces: 5/23 is 7,790 by 200 feet (2,374 x 61 m) and 18/36 is 7,605 by 200 feet (2,318 x 61 m).[1]

For the 12-month period ending January 2, 2011, the airport had 340 aircraft operations, an average of 28 per month: 62.4% scheduled commercial, 29.4% general aviation, and 8.2% military.[1]

Airline and destination[edit]

Scheduled passenger service service is subsidized by the Essential Air Service program. Alaska Airlines provides two flights weekly on Sunday and Thursday.[5] The aircraft used is a Boeing 737-400C.[6]

Airlines Destinations
Alaska Airlines Anchorage

Statistics[edit]

Carrier shares: January 2012 – December 2012[7]
Carrier Passengers (arriving and departing)
Alaska
4,390(100%)
Top domestic destinations: January 2012 – December 2012[7]
Rank City Airport Passengers
1 Anchorage, AK Ted Stevens Anchorage International (ANC) 2,190

In popular culture[edit]

Adak Airport was once featured on the television reality show, Alaska State Troopers.[citation needed]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d FAA Airport Master Record for ADK (Form 5010 PDF). Federal Aviation Administration. Effective May 31, 2012.
  2. ^ "Enplanements for CY 2008" (PDF, 1.0 MB). CY 2008 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data. Federal Aviation Administration. December 18, 2009. 
  3. ^ "Enplanements for CY 2010" (PDF, 189 KB). CY 2010 Passenger Boarding and All-Cargo Data. Federal Aviation Administration. October 4, 2011. 
  4. ^ "2011–2015 NPIAS Report, Appendix A" (PDF, 2.03 MB). National Plan of Integrated Airport Systems. Federal Aviation Administration. October 4, 2010. 
  5. ^ "City Guides: Adak". Alaska Airlines. 
  6. ^ "Combi ~ Freighter Flight Schedule: Winter 2011" (PDF). Alaska Airlines. 
  7. ^ a b "Adak Island, AK: Adak (ADK)". Bureau of Transportation Statistics. December 2012. Retrieved July 27, 2013. 

Other sources[edit]

  • "State Takes Over Adak Airport". State of Alaska Press Release. January 15, 2004. Archived from the original on September 23, 2006. 
  • Essential Air Service documents (Docket DOT-OST-2000-8556) from the U.S. Department of Transportation:
    • Order 2004-6-24 (June 25, 2004): re-selecting Alaska Airlines to provide essential air service at Adak, Alaska, at an annual subsidy rate of $1,617,923, for the period May 1, 2004, through June 30, 2006.
    • Order 2006-5-21 (May 23, 2006): re-selecting Alaska Airlines to provide essential air service at Adak, Alaska, at an annual subsidy rate of $1,393,384, and Peninsula Airways for $449,605 at Atka and $314,694 at Nikolski. The three rates extend through June 30, 2008.
    • Order 2008-3-36 (March 31, 2008): re-selecting Alaska Airlines to provide essential air service at Adak, Alaska, at an annual subsidy rate of $1,483,122, and Peninsula Airways for $513,803 at Atka and $469,786 at Nikolski. The three rates extend through June 30, 2010.
    • Order 2010-7-9 (July 15, 2010): re-selecting Alaska Airlines to provide essential air service (EAS) at Adak, Alaska, at an annual subsidy rate of $1,675,703, and Peninsula Airways, Inc., for $290,780 at Atka and $639,008 at Nikolski. The three rates extend through June 30, 2012.
    • Order 2012-9-10 (September 11, 2012): re-selecting Alaska Airlines, Inc. to provide Essential Air Service (EAS) at Adak, Alaska, consisting of two nonstop or one-stop round trips per week with Boeing 737 combi aircraft between Adak and Anchorage for an annual rate of $1,675,703, for only a one-year period.
    • Order 2013-7-14 (July 16, 2013): re-selecting Alaska Airlines, Inc., to provide Essential Air Service (EAS) at Adak, Alaska, for $2,057,114 annual subsidy from October 1, 2013, through September 30, 2015.

External links[edit]