Adam Brown Littlepage

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Adam Brown Littlepage (April 14, 1859 - June 29, 1921) was a lawyer and Democratic politician from West Virginia who served as a United States Representative. Congressman Littlepage was born near Charleston, West Virginia in Kanawha County (then in Virginia) on April 14, 1859. He served as a member of the 62nd, 64th, and 65th United States Congresses. He died in Charleston, June 29, 1921.

He attended the common schools, studied law, and was admitted to the bar. He entered practice in Newport, Indiana in 1882. He returned to Charleston in 1884 and continued the practice of law. He served the United Mine Workers Association in West Virginia as general counsel. From 1906 to 1910, he served as a member of the West Virginia Senate.

He was elected from West Virginia's 3rd District[1] as a Democrat to the Sixty-second Congress (March 4, 1911 – March 4, 1913). His candidacy for re-election to the Sixty-third Congress in 1912 was unsuccessful. He returned to serve from West Virginia's 3rd District[1] in the Sixty-fourth and Sixty-fifth Congresses (March 4, 1915 – March 4, 1919). He was an unsuccessful candidate for re-election in 1918 to the Sixty-sixth Congress and returned to his law practice. He died in Charleston on June 29, 1921 and was interred there at Spring Hill Cemetery.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lawrence Kestenbaum. "The Political Graveyard". Archived from the original on 26 July 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-16. 

External links[edit]

United States House of Representatives
Preceded by
Joseph H. Gaines
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from West Virginia's 3rd congressional district

1911–1913
Succeeded by
Samuel B. Avis
Preceded by
Samuel B. Avis
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from West Virginia's 3rd congressional district

1915–1917
Succeeded by
Stuart F. Reed
Preceded by
Howard Sutherland - at-large
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from West Virginia's 6th congressional district

1917–1919
Succeeded by
Leonard S. Echols

 This article incorporates public domain material from websites or documents of the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.