Adam Busby

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Adam Stuart Busby (born 1948) is a convicted terrorist, malicious hoaxer,[1] Scottish separatist and claims to be the founder of the Scottish National Liberation Army.[2] In 1983 after a hoax letter-bombing campaign against high-profile public figures he organised attacks from Dublin involving anthrax hoaxes, bomb threats, and genuine parcel bombs.[3] In 1997 he was jailed in Ireland for two hoax phone threats against Scottish media organisations.[4][5]

Early life[edit]

Busby was born in the Seedhill area of Paisley,[citation needed] and was associated with the separatist group called the Scottish Liberation Army. He joined the British army and trained briefly in the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.[4] [6]

Career[edit]

In 1983 letter bombs were sent to the Ministry of Defence, oil companies and public figures including Lady Diana Spencer and the Prime Minister, Margaret Thatcher. The device sent to Thatcher was active and was opened by parliamentarian Robert Key but there was no explosion. Busby fled to Dublin after the letter-bombing campaign.[4][3] He reportedly tried to join forces with the Provisional Irish Republican Army, but the offer is said to have been refused.[4] He organised attacks from Dublin involving anthrax hoaxes, bomb threats, and genuine parcel bombs.[3]

In 1997, Busby was jailed in Ireland for two hoax phone threats against Scottish media organisations.[4][5]

In May 2006 he sent threats by email from Charleville Mall public library to BAA at London Heathrow Airport claiming bombs were on two New York flights.[5] BAA did not take the threats seriously. Busby denied making the threats.

In September 2006, the Sunday Times reported that Busby might be targeted for extradition to the United States to face terror charges. Police in Ireland were said to have agreed to help the FBI, MI5 and Special Branch to investigate a series of e-mails to the US about how to contaminate US water supplies.[7]

In July 2010 he was sentenced by a Dublin court to four years in jail for the May 2006 threats by email to BAA at London Heathrow Airport claiming bombs were on two New York flights. Two of the years were suspended due to his age and health, as he has multiple sclerosis and uses a wheelchair.[3]

In 2010, Busby is alleged to have made threats against then-Prime Minister of the United Kingdom Gordon Brown.[8][9]

On 15 August 2012, a United States federal grand jury returned two indictments charging Busby, a resident of Ballymun, Dublin, Ireland,[5] with emailing bomb threats targeting the University of Pittsburgh, three federal courthouses and a federal officer. A separate four-count indictment charges Mr. Busby with, on 20 and 21 June, maliciously conveying false information through the Internet claiming bombs had been placed at federal courthouses in Pennsylvania in Pittsburgh, Erie and Johnstown.[10][11][12]

Busby was released from an Irish prison on 21 March 2014 and was reported to be living in a Dublin hostel, banned from internet access, awaiting verdicts about his extradition to Scotland and the US.[13][14]

Family[edit]

His son, Adam Busby Jr., was convicted in May 2009 of sending suspect packages, including to Alex Salmond of the Scottish National Party (SNP).[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Trib Live. 16 August 2012. Pitt threat suspect Adam Stuart Busby a 'serial hoaxer,' wannabe terrorist by Margaret Harding
  2. ^ 31 BBC News - Scotland. July 2013. Scottish separatist group leader Adam Busby to be extradited.
  3. ^ a b c d e Carrell, Severin (23 July 2010). "Scottish separatist Adam Busby jailed for Heathrow bomb hoaxes". The Guardian (London). Retrieved 23 July 2010. 
  4. ^ a b c d e "Who are the 'tartan terrorists'?". BBC News. 2 March 2002. Retrieved 2010-04-23. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Man sentenced over hoax threats". Irish Times. 23 July 2010. Retrieved 23 July 2010. 
  6. ^ Inside A Terrorist Group, The Story Of The SNLA (David Leslie), Chapter 5
  7. ^ MacAskill, Mark; Allardyce, Jason (10 September 2006). "SNLA threat to poison water supply". The Times (London). Retrieved 2010-04-23. 
  8. ^ Belfast Telegraph 1 April 2014, Brown threat accused leaves prison
  9. ^ Independent.ie. 1 April 2014. "Brown threat accused leaves prison"
  10. ^ "Ireland Man Charged in Pitt Bomb Threat Case". CBSLocal.com. Retrieved 15 August 2012. 
  11. ^ Gurman, Sadie; Fuoco, Michael A.; Schackner, Bill (15 August 2012). "Man from Ireland Charged in Pitt bomb threat case". Pittsburgh Post Gazette. Retrieved 15 August 2012. 
  12. ^ "Man claiming to be in Scottish terror group charged in threats against Pitt". The Washington Post. AP. 15 August 2012. Retrieved 15 August 2012. 
  13. ^ CBS News. 1 April 2014. University of Pittsburgh bomb threat suspect released from jail in Ireland
  14. ^ Pitt Post 1 April 2014 Accused emailer of bomb threats to Pitt released from jail in Ireland. By Rich Lord