Adam Hawkes

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Adam Hawkes
Born January 25/26, 1605
Hingham, Norfolk, England
Died March 13, 1672
Saugus, Massachusetts
Nationality English, American

Adam Hawkes was an English immigrant who was the original settler of what is now known as Saugus, Massachusetts, United States.

Biography[edit]

Hawkes was born on January 25 or 26, 1605, to John Hawke and an unknown mother, in Hingham, Norfolk, England. He was then baptized January 26, 1605, at St. Andrews Church, Higham, Norfolk.[1]

Hawkes immigrated from England with the Winthrop Fleet, led by John Winthrop, in 1630.[2]

On arrival in America Hawkes first settled in Charlestown in the Massachusetts Bay Colony. In Charlestown he worked as a husbandman, holding the offices of Cow Commissioner and Surveyor. After getting married and selling his property in Charlestown in 1635, Hawkes then moved to the wilderness in Lynn (now known as Saugas) to cultivate the land and start farming. The Hawkes family were the fist known settlers of this area.[1] The first log cabin that Hawkes built came to be known as "Close Hill".[3]

Hawkes died on March 13, 1672, in Saugus.

Marriages[edit]

In 1631 Hawkes married Ann Hutchinson (née Brown), widow of Thomas Hutchinson. Her parents were Edward Brown and Jane Brown (née Lide). She was born circa 1615 in Inkberrow, Worcestershire, England, and died in Lynn, Essex County, Massachusetts on October 4, 1669.[4]

With the death of his first wife, Hawkes then married Sarah Hooper, daughter of William and Elizabeth Hooper. Their marriage was on June 2, 1670, making Hawkes 65 years old. Sarah was born on December 7, 1650, in Reading (now Wakefield), Middlesex County, Massachusetts.[4]

Children[edit]

With wife Ann:[1]

  • John Hawkes, b. February 1630/31, Charlestown, Suffolk Co., MA, d. before 1633
  • John Hawkes, b. August 13, 1633, Charlestown, Suffolk, MA, d. August 5, 1694, Lynn, MA
  • Susannah Hawkes, b. August 13, 1633, d. before 1696

Possibly with Ann, possibly stepchildren:

  • Adam Hawkes, d. date unknown
  • Moses Hawkes, d. date unknown
  • Benjamin Hawkes, d. date unknown
  • Thomas Hawkes, d. date unknown

With wife Sarah:[1]

  • Sarah Hawkes, b. June 1, 1671, Lynn, MA, d. December 23, 1716, Andover, MA

Posthumous Activity[edit]

In 1876 Reverend Winfield Scott Hawkes formed the Adam Hawkes Family Association. Their first reunion was held in 1880, in North Saugus, Massachusetts, at the Lewis Penn Hawkes Homestead.[3] Over 400 people were in attendance. Dr. John Milton Hawks, the first president of the Adam Hawkes Family Association, spent many years compiling the Hawkes ancestry. These genealogical records remain to this day in the New England Historic Genealogy Society in Boston.[5]

In 1957 Bradley H Patterson published Adam Hawkes, 1608-1672: His life and times.[6]

Adam Hawkes of Saugus, Mass., 1605-1672, The First Six Generations in America was published 1980 from author Ethel Farrington Smith and the Adam Hawkes Family Association.[7]

John Hawks, a founder of Hadley, Massachusetts: after a sojourn of twenty-four years at Windsor, Connecticut : thirteen generations in America, by Imogene Hawks Lane, was published in 1989.[8]

Massachusetts politician Samuel Hawkes is descended from Adam Hawkes.[9]

Second President of the United States John Adams is Hawkes' great-great-great grandson.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e "Adam Hawkes (b. Abt. January 25, 1604/05, d. March 13, 1671/72)". Genealogy. Retrieved 2013-11-14. 
  2. ^ "Adam Hawkes, 1605-1672, Saugus, MA". Adam Hawkes Family Association. Retrieved 2013-11-14. 
  3. ^ a b "Hawkes talks : genealogical bulletin of the Adam Hawkes Family Association, Inc.". Family Search. Retrieved 2013-11-15. 
  4. ^ a b "Adam HAWKES". Kristin Hall. Retrieved 2013-11-14. 
  5. ^ "Celebrating 125 years". Adam Hawkes Family Association. Retrieved 2013-11-15. 
  6. ^ Patterson, Bradley H. (1957). Adam Hawkes, 1608-1672: His life and times. Loundon Times Publishing Co. 
  7. ^ Smith, Ethel Farrington (1980). Adam Hawkes of Saugus, Mass., 1605-1672: the first six generations in America. Gateway Press. 
  8. ^ Lane, Imogene Hawks (1989). John Hawks, a founder of Hadley, Massachusetts: after a sojourn of twenty-four years at Windsor, Connecticut : thirteen generations in America. Gateway Press. 
  9. ^ Lynn Historical Society (1898). The Register of the Lynn Historical Society, Volumes 1-7. The Register of the Lynn Historical Society. pp. 43–45. Lynn Historical Society. 1898. pp. 43–45.