Adam Storch

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Adam Storch
Born Adam D. Storch
1980
New York
Occupation Accountant

Adam Storch (born 1980) served as the first Managing Executive of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's Division of Enforcement, having been hired on October 16, 2009. Adam Storch was charged with making the division more efficient. He managed all strategic planning and operational aspects of the Enforcement Division. Storch played a large role in the design and implementation of significant restructuring in the Enforcement Division’s history, including the creation of specialized units, the Office of Market Intelligence and the Office of the Whistleblower. Storch also was involved in the recent establishment of the Enforcement Division’s Center for Risk and Quantitative Analysis.[1] "The Division of Enforcement was created in August 1972 to consolidate enforcement activities that previously had been handled by the various operating divisions at the Commission's headquarters in Washington," according to the SEC site.[2]

In June 2014 it was announced that Storch was leaving the Securities and Exchange Commission agency. [3]

Prior to joining the SEC, Storch was a vice president in the business intelligence group at Goldman Sachs, reviewing transactions for regulatory, financial and reputational risks. [4] He has worked as a senior consultant working on enterprise risk services at Deloitte & Touche and an intern for Neuberger Berman. [5] Storch is a Certified Public Accountant in the state of New York and is also a Certified Internal Auditor and a Certified Fraud Examiner. [6] He earned a B.S. degree in business administration, summa cum laude, from the SUNY Buffalo School of Management. He received an MBA from New York University's Stern School of Business. In 2007, Storch was named the Frank L. Ciminelli Family Career Resource Center's Alumnus of the Year, in recognition of his volunteer efforts assisting School of Management students. He was also featured on CNBC.[7][8]


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