Adamson, Oklahoma

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Adamson is a ghost town in Pittsburg County, Oklahoma, United States. It was a prosperous coal mining town before and during World War I, especially during 1913 to 1919. On September 4, 1914, Adamson was the site of one of the worst coal mine disasters in the United States.[1]

History[edit]

The post office was established on March 1, 1906.[1] The town was named for Peter Adamson, a mine owner. [2]

Adamson first developed as a coal mining camp. The town reached its peak during World War I, with a population of about 3,500 and 15 operating mines. The Rock Island and Katy railroads both built spurs into the town. [1]

One of the worst mining disasters in Oklahoma occurred at Mine No. 1 on September 4, 1914. Mine No. 1 began to collapse about 3:30 P.M. One of the miners reported a cracking sound and an immediate evacuation was ordered. Almost all of the miners quickly moved toward the surface, except for fourteen who were trapped at the lowest level of the mine, Those men were buried by the collapse of the entire mine. Neither rescue nor recovery of bodies was possible. The surface of the ground sank dropped between Template:Cpnvert and 10 feet (3.0 m).[1]

As of 1977, John Morris reported that there were still about ten homes, occupied by retired people, and two small grocery stores remaining in the town. Visitors to nearby Lake Eufaula were the main source of business for these stores. The mines had all been closed and had filled with water.[1]

Geography[edit]

Adamson is located at 34°55′26″N 95°32′49″W / 34.92389°N 95.54694°W / 34.92389; -95.54694Coordinates: 34°55′26″N 95°32′49″W / 34.92389°N 95.54694°W / 34.92389; -95.54694.

Elevation is 620 feet.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Morris, John (1977). Ghost Towns of Oklahoma. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press. p. 229. ISBN 978-0-8061-1420-0. 
  2. ^ Shirk, George (1987). Oklahoma Place Names. Norman, Oklahoma, United States of America: University of Oklahoma Press. p. 288. ISBN 978-0-8061-2028-7. 

External links[edit]