Addyston, Ohio

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Addyston, Ohio
Village
Location in Hamilton County and the state of Ohio.
Location in Hamilton County and the state of Ohio.
Coordinates: 39°8′18″N 84°42′48″W / 39.13833°N 84.71333°W / 39.13833; -84.71333Coordinates: 39°8′18″N 84°42′48″W / 39.13833°N 84.71333°W / 39.13833; -84.71333
Country United States
State Ohio
County Hamilton
Township Miami
Area[1]
 • Total 0.91 sq mi (2.36 km2)
 • Land 0.85 sq mi (2.20 km2)
 • Water 0.06 sq mi (0.16 km2)
Elevation[2] 472 ft (144 m)
Population (2010)[3]
 • Total 938
 • Estimate (2012[4]) 935
 • Density 1,103.5/sq mi (426.1/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 45001
Area code(s) 513
FIPS code 39-00436[5]
GNIS feature ID 1064299[2]
Website www.addystonohio.org

Addyston is a village in Miami Township, Hamilton County, Ohio, United States, along the Ohio River. The population was 938 at the 2010 census.[6]

History[edit]

Located approximately 10 miles west of downtown Cincinnati on the Ohio River, Addyston is a friendly community of about 1,000 residents, founded in 1891 by Matthew Addy. Addyston Village Council first met on Wednesday, September 2, 1891. The first meeting of council dealt with organization laws that had to be passed in order for Addyston to become a legal village and control the growing population.

The 1900 census shows there were many Kentuckyians and other southerners who came to work in the Pipe Foundry. Also in the census were Indianaians, Ohioans, people from England, Germany plus the Irish left over from the canal building. Immediate needs were a school, churches, and places of business. The Burr Oak school was built in 1875 to provide for surrounding farm children and Addyston children.

The west end of the village was the main business district. There were two large brick buildings, designed by John Boll. The brick buildings, one of which is still in use, were actually built before Addyston became a village. There were many grocery stores each with its own stables as was Diller's pharmacy. There was also a smithy, a cobbler, clothing stores, stables, and barber shops.

The east end business district was First Street, sometimes referred to as Front Street. Here there were several grocery stores, a large hotel and bar, a confectionary, and a Feed and Grain store. In 1891, Peter Wycoff's lumber mill was on the creek at the north end of First Street.

Geography[edit]

Addyston is located at 39°8′18″N 84°42′48″W / 39.13833°N 84.71333°W / 39.13833; -84.71333 (39.138292, -84.713204).[7]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 0.91 square miles (2.36 km2), of which, 0.85 square miles (2.20 km2) is land and 0.06 square miles (0.16 km2) is water.[1]

Demographics[edit]

2010 census[edit]

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 938 people, 372 households, and 228 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,103.5 inhabitants per square mile (426.1 /km2). There were 448 housing units at an average density of 527.1 per square mile (203.5 /km2). The racial makeup of the village was 89.7% White, 5.7% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.2% Asian, 0.1% from other races, and 4.2% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.9% of the population.

There were 372 households of which 33.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 33.6% were married couples living together, 20.7% had a female householder with no husband present, 7.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 38.7% were non-families. 29.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.15.

The median age in the village was 34.2 years. 25.3% of residents were under the age of 18; 11.5% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27% were from 25 to 44; 26.1% were from 45 to 64; and 10.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the village was 50.5% male and 49.5% female.

2000 census[edit]

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 1,010 people, 365 households, and 269 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,165.1 people per square mile (448.2/km²). There were 408 housing units at an average density of 470.7 per square mile (181.1/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 87.82% White, 8.42% African American, 0.50% Native American, 0.40% Asian, 1.09% from other races, and 1.78% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.78% of the population.

There were 365 households out of which 40.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.1% were married couples living together, 24.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.3% were non-families. 24.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.77 and the average family size was 3.22.

In the village the population was spread out with 31.7% under the age of 18, 8.8% from 18 to 24, 31.4% from 25 to 44, 18.0% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 98.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.2 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $33,000, and the median income for a family was $34,808. Males had a median income of $29,583 versus $25,536 for females. The per capita income for the village was $13,266. About 9.2% of families and 11.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.4% of those under age 18 and 14.8% of those age 65 or over.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]