Adel Flaifel

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Colonel Adel Jassim Flaifel (or Felaifel, or Flaifil) (Arabic: عادل فليفل‎) is a former colonel in the State Security and Intelligence Service of Bahrain. He is accused of committing, or overseeing, acts of physical and psychological torture on Bahraini citizens from 1980s until 1997.[1] He was released from his duties in December 2002 due to protests and pressures from human rights organizations worldwide. In March 2000, King Hamad awarded Flaifel with the Order of Shaikh Isa bin Salman Al Khalifa (Third Class).[2]

Flaifel has never been charged with any crime. In the Royal Decree 56 of 2002, an edict issued by King Hamad ibn Isa al-Khalifah granted amnesty to human rights abuses committed by security officers prior to 2001. Torture allegations against Flaifel have been documented by the international human rights organizations,[3] Human Rights Watch,[1] and Amnesty International.[4] Protests have been held regularly in Bahrain since 2002 demanding prosecution of Flaifel for carrying out torture.[5][6]

Flaifel has been accused of carrying out torture along with former Bahrain State Security chief Ian Henderson.[7]

In November 2002, 8 Bahraini torture victims lodged complaints against Flaifel with Directorate of Public Prosecutions, however no charges have been taken against him by the government of Bahrain.[8]

Fraud and embezzlement charges[edit]

Flaifel managed to flee Bahrain on May 3, 2002, despite being wanted for involvement in fraud.[9] He fled to Brisbane, Australia where he purchased 50 million Australian dollars' worth of prime Brisbane central business district buildings. It would later turn out that he was being sought after by Interpol on fraud and embezzlement charges, following a request from the Bahrain Government on May 20, 2002.[10]

Two individuals, Omar Ali Babtain, the president and chief executive officer of the United Medical Group, which equips and manages hospitals throughout the world, and Khalid Bin Nasser Bin Abdulla Al Misnad, president of the Misnad Group, an international trading and construction company, lodged a challenge against Flaifel with the Supreme Court in Brisbane challenging his ownership of the Australian properties.[11] The pair claimed Flaifel had sold them properties in the Middle East worth 59.5 Australian dollars, but never transferred the contracts, and used that money to purchase the Australian properties.[12]

When it became apparent that Flaifel was in Australia, Lord Eric Avebury, the vice-chairman of Britain's Parliamentary Human Rights Group, said he would call on Australia to try Flaifel for his alleged torture of Bahraini political activists.[13]

Following the fraud and embezzlement case in Australian courts, Flaifel's assets were frozen internationally and he was not allowed to leave Australia.[14]

2010 Election campaign[edit]

Adel Flaifel is registered as a candidate to run as a member of the Council of Representatives of Bahrain (lower house of Parliament) in the 2010 legislative elections in Bahrain from Electoral District 5 of the Muharraq Governorate.[15][16] He is running on behalf of the "Islamic Row" Society.

Death threat incident[edit]

On 5 December, Flaifel tweeted death threats against three activists involved in the 2011-2012 Bahraini uprising: Mohammed Al-Maskati, Nabeel Rajab, and Yousef Al-Mahafdha. The incident led the International Federation for Human Rights and the World Organisation Against Torture to issue a joint statement calling for a letter-writing campaign on the men's behalf.[17]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Bahrain: Investigate Torture Claims Against Ex-Officer, Human Rights Watch, 17 Dec 2002
  2. ^ "Amiri Decree No 11 of the Year 2000 on the Granting of Medals". Official Gazette of the Kingdom of Bahrain. 15 March 2000. 
  3. ^ Silverman, Jon (16 April 2003). "Is the UK facing up to Bahrain's past?". BBC News Online. Retrieved 5 May 2011. "Pro-democracy unrest was ruthlessly suppressed in Bahrain and allegations of brutality were made against both Colonel Henderson and his deputy, Adel Felaifel. According to organisations such as Human Rights Watch and Amnesty, the methods used to cow anti-government activists included beatings, sexual abuse and the ransacking of whole villages." 
  4. ^ Bahrain: Amnesty International concerned that new legislation allows impunity for human rights offences, Amnesty International, 29 Nov 2002
  5. ^ "Bahrainis demand trial of police 'torturer'". BBC News Online. 24 November 2002. Retrieved 5 May 2011. "The protestors accuse Colonel Adel Flaifel, a former senior official at the interior ministry, of torturing many Bahrainis during political unrest in the 1980s and 1990s." 
  6. ^ "Protesters remember martyrs on Bahrain's national day". Associated Press. 17 December 2002. "The protesters also denounced Col. Adel Jassim Flaifil, a former aide to Ian Henderson" 
  7. ^ Mackay, Neil (21 November 1999). "Victims identify Scots colonel as Bahrain torturer". Sunday Herald. Retrieved 5 May 2011. "My first experience of Henderson took place in 1982 when I was hanged like a chicken at the office of Adel Flaifel, one of Henderson's henchmen." 
  8. ^ "Reparation for Torture: A Survey of Law and Practice in 30 Selected Countries: Bahrain Country Report". Redress Trust. May 2003. p. 5. "in November 2002, 8 torture victims lodged complaints relating to their treatment with the Directorate of Public Prosecutions for an effective investigation, and requesting that charges be laid against one of the alleged perpetrators, Adel Felaifel, who was already being investigated on relation to fraud and embezzlement charges." 
  9. ^ "Bahrain's New National Security Agency". GulfSecurityReport.com. 18 May 2002. Retrieved 5 May 2011. "Indeed, the GDCI also faced charges of involvement in fraud, and Interpol has been asked to help track one officer, Colonel Adel Flaifel, who is wanted for financial dealings. Opposition groups have also accused him of involvement in torture. Flaifel was able to leave the country on 3 May despite a travel ban." 
  10. ^ Griffith, Chris (10 August 2002). "Mystery CBD buyer named as Interpol fugitive". The Courier-Mail. "A mystery Middle-Eastern buyer of A$50 million worth of prime Brisbane CBD buildings has been identified as the fugitive deputy head of Bahrain Intelligence who is sought by Interpol on fraud and embezzlement charges. Former colonel Adel Jassim Felaifel fled to Australia from Bahrain where he is wanted for unlawfully obtaining a document by force, unlawfully obtaining property by fraudulent means, and issuing cheques without sufficient funds." 
  11. ^ Griffith, Chris (10 August 2002). "Mystery CBD buyer named as Interpol fugitive". The Courier-Mail. "Omar Ali Babtain, the president and chief executive officer of the United Medical Group, which equips and manages hospitals throughout the world, and Khalid Bin Nasser Bin Abdulla Al Misnad, president of the Misnad Group, an international trading and construction company, have lodged the challenge in the Supreme Court in Brisbane." 
  12. ^ Griffith, Chris (10 August 2002). "Mystery CBD buyer named as Interpol fugitive". The Courier-Mail. "He said Mr Felaifel sold him and Mr Misnad Middle-Eastern properties for A$59.5 million between June 2001 and April this year, but never transferred the contracts.The two believe their money funded his Australian property acquisitions." 
  13. ^ "Investor tortured people, says lord". The Courier-Mail. 26 August 2002. "However Lord Eric Avebury, the vice-chairman of Britain's Parliamentary Human Rights Group and previously its chairman for 21 years, said he would urge Australia to try the former colonel under law reflecting its international treaty obligations." 
  14. ^ Griffith, Chris (31 August 2002). "Fugitive in fight for visa". The Courier-Mail. "Mr Felaifel's assets have been frozen internationally and he is not allowed to leave Australia." 
  15. ^ Adel Flaifel, Bahrain Elections 2010 (Arabic)
  16. ^ Adel Flaifel, Bahrain Elections 2010 (English)
  17. ^ "Death threats against Messrs. Mohammed Al-Maskati, Nabeel Rajab and Yousef Al-Mahafdha - BHR 009 / 1211 / OBS 136". FIDH. 7 December 2011. Retrieved 14 April 2012.