Adele Arakawa

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Adele Arakawa
Born Adele Hausser
(1958-08-31) August 31, 1958 (age 55)
Nationality United States American
Spouse(s) Barry Tiller
(1977-present)
Children 1

Adele Arakawa (born August 31, 1958) is an American evening news anchor for NBC affiliate station KUSA-TV of Denver, Colorado. She was the first female radio disc jockey in Knoxville, Tennessee. As of June 2007, she provides the female voice of the airport train system at Denver International Airport.[1]

Biography[edit]

Born Adele Hausser on August 31, 1958, Adele was raised in Hawaii and later east Tennessee. At age 16, she began taking college courses at Tennessee Tech University and working as a radio disc jockey in her hometown of La Follette, Tennessee. She also attended the University of Tennessee. Following her entry into radio, she worked as a radio news anchor at WYSH in Clinton, Tennessee and as a disc jockey at WRJZ in Knoxville, Tennessee, where she became the first female disc jockey in Knoxville. She married her husband, Barry Tiller, in 1977. Has one son, Travis (b. 1985).

In 1981, Adele made the transition to television news, working at WTVK in weather in Knoxville where she began using her mother's maiden name, Arakawa, at the suggestion of news director Hal Wanzer.[2] Two years later, she moved to Raleigh, North Carolina to coanchor weekday evening newscasts for WRAL-TV. Adele and her husband had a son in 1985. Her career next took the family to Chicago in 1989, where she again anchored weekday evening newscasts, this time for CBS affiliate WBBM-TV.[3] Since Christmas Day 1993, she has been a weekday evening newscast anchor for KUSA-TV in Denver.[4]

Awards[edit]

Best Interview / Discussion Program (with team), Heartland Chapter, National Television Academy[8]
  • 2004: Best News Anchor (tie), Heartland Chapter, National Television Academy[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Flynn, Kevin (2007-05-07). "New voices coming for DIA trains". Rocky Mountain News. Archived from the original on 2007-07-11. Retrieved 2007-09-02. 
  2. ^ Roberts, Michael (2000-11-23). "The Story of Adele H". Westword (Village Voice Media). Archived from the original on 29 September 2007. Retrieved 2007-08-31. 
  3. ^ Feder, Robert (1988-09-07). "'Hillbilly'? 'Airhead'? Or a Ch. 2 anchor?". Chicago Sun-Times. p. 43. 
  4. ^ Ostrow, Joanne (1993-12-05). "New Channel 9 anchor hungry for news". Denver Post. p. 1-D. 
  5. ^ "AAJA National Awards 1989-2007". Asian American Journalists Association. Archived from the original on 2007-09-27. Retrieved 2007-09-02. 
  6. ^ "1997 Heartland Winners". NATAS Heartland Chapter. Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-02. 
  7. ^ "1999 Heartland Winners". NATAS Heartland Chapter. Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-02. 
  8. ^ a b "2001 Heartland Winners". NATAS Heartland Chapter. Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-02. 
  9. ^ "2004 Heartland Winners". NATAS Heartland Chapter. Archived from the original on 28 September 2007. Retrieved 2007-09-02. 

External links[edit]