Adenomera andreae

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Adenomera andreae
Adenomera andreae.jpg
Conservation status
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Amphibia
Order: Anura
Family: Leptodactylidae
Genus: Adenomera
Species: A. andreae
Binomial name
Adenomera andreae
(Müller, 1923)
Synonyms

Leptodactylus andreae Müller, 1923

Adenomera andreae (common name: lowland tropical bullfrog) is a species of frog in the Leptodactylidae family. It is found in the lowlands of northern South America east of the Andes (Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, French Guiana, Guyana, Peru, Suriname, and Venezuela).[1][2] As currently defined, it probably represents a cryptic species complex,[1] comprising perhaps four species.[3]

Description[edit]

Adenomera andreae are small frogs, usually less than 30 mm (1.2 in) in adult body length. dorsum is grayish brown to beige, occasionally with dark brown spots, and rarely with a vertebral dark brown stripe and/or dorsolateral orangish yellow stripe. The ventral surfaces are white. iris is chestnut.[4]

Eggs are laid in foam nests on the ground.[1] Tadpoles are terrestrial: they are endotrophic and develop in the nest. Recruitment of juveniles is synchronized with rainfall.[5]

Habitat[edit]

Its natural habitats are tropical moist lowland forests, but it can also be found in open environments such as grasslands surrounded by forest habitats. It is threatened by habitat loss from clear cutting.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e La Marca, E., Azevedo-Ramos, C., Coloma, L.A. & Ron, S. (2004). "Adenomera andreae". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2014.2. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  2. ^ Frost, Darrel R. (2014). "Adenomera andreae (Müller, 1923)". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  3. ^ Frost, Darrel R. (2014). "Adenomera Steindachner, 1867". Amphibian Species of the World: an Online Reference. Version 6.0. American Museum of Natural History. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  4. ^ Cole, C. J.; Townsend, C. R.; Reynolds, R. P.; MacCulloch, R. D.; Lathrop, A. (2013). "Amphibians and reptiles of Guyana, South America: Illustrated keys, annotated species accounts, and a biogeographic synopsis". Proceedings of the Biological Society of Washington 125 (4): 317–578. doi:10.2988/0006-324X-125.4.317.  edit
  5. ^ Glória Moreira and Albertina P. Lima (1991). "Seasonal patterns of juvenile recruitment and reproduction in four species of leaf litter frogs in central Amazonia". Herpetologica 47 (3): 295–300. JSTOR 3892620.