Adi ibn Hatim

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Adiyy ibn Hatim ( عدي ابن حاتم الطائي ) was a leader of the Arab tribe of Tayy, and one of the companions of Muhammad. He is the son of the poet Hatim al-Tai[1] who was widely known for his chivalry and generosity among Arabs. Adi remained antagonistic to Islam for about twenty years until he converted to Islam from Christianity[2] in 630 (9th year of Hijra).[3]

Adiyy inherited the domain of his father and was confirmed in the position by the Tayy people. A great part of his strength lay in the fact that a quarter of any amount they gained as booty from raiding expeditions had to be given to him.

Adi joined the Islamic army at the time of caliph Abu Bakr. He fought wars of revolt against the apostates and also was a commander of the Islamic army sent to invade Iraq under the command of Khalid ibn al-Walid. He also fought on the side of the final Rightly Guided Caliph, Ali ibn Abi Talib, at the Battle of Camel and Battle of Siffin.

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Living Prophet by Syed Sulaiman Nadvi. pp. 106
  2. ^ Mohammed and the Rise of Islam By David Samuel Margoliouth. pp. 437-438
  3. ^ Muhammad: The Messenger of Islam By Hajjah Amina Adil. pp. 530