Adland

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Adland
Web address http://adland.tv/
Type of site Community Weblog
Owner Åsk Wäppling
Created by Åsk Wäppling

Adland is a community weblog and advertising archive whose purpose is to share advertising news, gossip, and archive advertising work from around the world, concentrating on commercials and videos. Adland has the worlds largest collection of Super Bowl commercials spanning over 30 years. In July 2011 Brand republic listed it as the tenth best advertising, marketing, media, PR and digital blog in the world,[1]', while Business Insider in July 2012 put Adland on a list of the 22 most influential advertising bloggers.[2]

Community[edit]

Adland was founded by Åsk Wäppling in 1996, best known on the site under her nom de plume Dabitch [3]'. Adland has over 90,000 registered members and in 2007 the site had "914,436 unique monthly visitors and 4.87 million monthly visits.".[4] Adland has been on the URLs ad-rag.com and commercial-archive.com since 1999, and switched to adland.tv in 2009. According to Åsk Wäppling "We preserve, we publish, we deliver, we review and sometimes harass all advertising there is." [5] Adland has provided ads to news organisations for review purposes, for example New York Times.[6] It began as a place to collect plagiarized ads under the heading Badland,[7] with a mailinglist called adlist on the side. In 2000 the site changed to a blog. FastCompany said that it 'generates a more diverse array of insight'[3] as it allows for the members to post news. The website "tracks gossip news and dud ads from around the world" as well as collects advertising and commercials.

In February 2011 Adland was banned from Google AdSense after a post with a picture from a Sloggi ad was added by Åsk Wäppling.[8]

The original CMS was phpnuke but Adland has now moved to use Drupal.

Death threats[edit]

In the summer of 2008 during the Olympics in China, Åsk Wäppling received death threats over a Red Cross campaign posted on Adland.[9][10] The Red Cross stated that they were "standing behind ad blogger" as Adland kept the campaign available on the site despite the threats.[11]

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