Adler von Lübeck

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Adler von Lübeck.jpg
Adler von Lübeck by Olaf Rahardt, painted in 2004.
Career (Lübeck) Coat of arms of the city of Lübeck
Name: Adler von Lübeck
Builder: Wallhalbinsel in Lübeck
Laid down: 1565
Launched: March 1566
Commissioned: 1567
Fate: disassembled in 1588
General characteristics
Displacement: 2-3,000 tons
Length: 78.30 m (256.9 ft) (overall)
Beam: 14.50 m (47.6 ft)
Draught: 5.30 m (17.4 ft)
Propulsion: Sails— 1,793.53 m²
Complement: 1,000: 350 crew & 650 marines
Armament:

138 cannon Bronze guns:

  • 8 × 48 pounders
  • 6 × 24 pounders
  • 26 × 10 pounders
  • 4 × 5 pounders
  • 8 × 3 pounders

Iron guns:

  • 10 × 6 pounders
  • 40 × 1½ pounders
  • 36 × varying calibre
Notes: Height from waterline to top of mainmast: 62.51 m

The Adler von Lübeck (German for Eagle of Lübeck), also called Der Große Adler or Lübscher Adler, was a 16th-century warship of the Hanseatic city of Lübeck, Germany. The Adler was one of the largest ships in the world at its time, being 78.30 m long overall and displacing 2–3,000 tons.

The war galleon was built by Lübeck during the Northern Seven Years' War to escort her convoy of merchant ships in the Baltic and North Sea. However, the Adler was never put into action, since Lübeck had already entered peace negotiations with Sweden at the time of the ship's completion. After the Treaty of Stettin (1570), the Große Adler was converted into a freighter for trade with the Iberian peninsula. The ship was dismantled in 1588 after twenty years of service.

Dimensions[edit]

The Lübeck chronicler Peter van der Horst - relying on the building contract of the ship - gave the following dimensions of the Adler von Lübeck:[1]

  • Length of head knee: 10.45 m (18 ells)
  • Length of keel: 36 m (62 ells)
  • Length from stern post to stern post: 49 m (85 ells)
  • Length from head knee to stern gallery: 64 m (111 ells)
  • Length overall: 78.30 m
  • Clear beam inboards: 13.84 m (24 ells)
  • Beam inboards: 13.84 m (48 ft)
  • Beam: 14.50 m
  • Height overall: 62.15 m

The gun arrangements of the ship have been preserved in the artillery manual of the artillery master Hans Frese.[2]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Van der Horst(e), Peter (1676): "Beschreibung von der Kunst der Schiffahrt – Zum andernmahl auffgeleget und mit einem Anhang vermehret, worin beschrieben wird der Anfang und Fortgang der Schiffahrt", 2nd. ed., Schmalhertzens Erven, Lübeck (PDF)
  2. ^ Frese, Hans (16th century): "Artilleriebuch der Adler von Lübeck", Archive of the Hanseatic city of Lübeck

Further reading[edit]

In chronological order

Articles & monographs

  • Van der Horst(e), Peter (1676): "Beschreibung von der Kunst der Schiffahrt – Zum andernmahl auffgeleget und mit einem Anhang vermehret, worin beschrieben wird der Anfang und Fortgang der Schiffahrt", 2nd. ed., Schmalhertzens Erven, Lübeck (PDF)
  • Pâris, Charles François-Edmond (1882-1892): "Le Musée de Marine du Louvre", Paris
  • Pâris, Charles François-Edmond (1962): "Souvenirs de Marine", Partie 1-5, Hinstorff, Rostock [Reprint]
  • Nance, Robert Morton & Anderson, Roger C. (1912): "A Sixteenth Century Ship of Lübeck", The Mariner's Mirror, pp. 152–153
  • Arenhold, Lüder, (1913): "The Adler of Lübeck", The Mariner's Mirror, pp. 152–153
  • Anderson, Roger C. (1913): "Guns of Adler of Lübeck", The Mariner's Mirror, pp. 153, 222, 250, 285 & 345
  • Kloth, Herbert: "Lübecks Seekriegswesen in der Zeit des nordischen 7-jährigen Krieges 1563-1570", Zeitschrift des Vereines für lübeckische Geschichte und Altertumskunde, Vol. 21 (1923), pp. 1–51 & 185-256 plus Vol. 22 (1923–25), pp. 121–152 & 325-379 Details on a number of details on construction, rigging, equipment and crew of the Adler von Lübeck are scattered throughout the article
  • Anderson, Roger C. (1939): "The Mars and the Adler", The Mariner's Mirror, pp. 296–299 [+plates]
  • Reinhardt, Karl (1943): "Der Adler von Lübeck", Die Seekiste - Schiffsmodellbau, Berlin, Iss. 12
  • Pietsch, Ulrich (1982): "Die Lübecker Seeschiffahrt vom Mittelalter bis zur Neuzeit", Catalogue of the Museum für Kunst und Kulturgeschichte der Hansestadt Lübeck, Lübeck ISBN 3-9800517-1-4
  • Kirsch, Peter (1988): "Die Galeonen. Große Segelschiffe um 1600", Bernard & Gräfe Verlag, Koblenz, p. 67

Modern model ships

  • Reinhardt, Karl (1938): "Adler von Lübeck", Zeitschrift des Vereines für lübeckische Geschichte und Altertumskunde, Vol. 29, Iss. 2, pp. 293–332
  • Marquardt, Karl Heinz (c. 1965): "Adler von Lübeck AD 1565", 35 pp., 4 drawings Ship model of the Graupner company
  • Aarhuus, Norbert (1982): "Adler von Lübeck", Modellbauwerft, Verlag für Technik und Handwerk, Baden-Baden, Iss. 6, pp. 496–500 Article on the Graupner model
  • Author unknown (1984): "Adler von Lübeck. MBH-Miniplan 67", Modellbau-Heute (MBH), Militärverlag der DDR, Berlin, Iss. 7, p. 16
  • Author unknown (1994): "Adler von Lübeck", Modellbauwerft, Verlag für Technik und Handwerk, Baden-Baden, Iss. 8, p. 27

Gallery[edit]

External links[edit]