Adolphe Appian

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Adolphe Appian
Adolphe Appian.jpg
Adolphe Appian (photo by Camille Dolard)
Born Jacques Barthelemy Adolphe Appian
(1819-08-28)28 August 1819
Lyon, France
Died 29 April 1898(1898-04-29) (aged 78)
Lyon, France
Nationality French
Known for Painting, Etching
Movement Barbizon school

Adolphe Appian (born as Jacques Barthelemy Adolphe Appian on 28 August 1819 in Lyon, France, died on 29 April 1898 in Lyon) was a French landscape painter and etcher.

Early Life[edit]

Appian was born in Lyon and changed his name to Adolphe Appian when he became fifteen. At the age of fifteen Appian attended the Ecole des Beaux-Arts at Lyon which was an art school which specialized in training to decorate fabrics by a local silk industry. He studied under Jean-Michel Grobon and Augustin Alexandre Thierrat. Later he opened a studio in Lyon and worked as a graphic designer. He travelled to Paris to finish his studies and after he had exhibited a painting and a charcoal drawing in the Paris Salon in 1853 he became friends with Camille Corot and Charles-François Daubigny who greatly influenced his style. Appian was elected a Chevalier of the Legion of Honour.[1][2]

Works[edit]

In 1866, Appian's two works that he exhibited in Paris were bought by Napoleon III and by princess Mathilde.[3] He painted at the beginning of his career atmospheric pictures in a monochromatic palette of the riverside of the Rhone and the south of France. In 1870 he changed his style to use brilliant and striking color in his paintings but he still continued to make charcoal drawings as well as small etchings of landscapes in the Barbizon style.[4]

As an etcher, he had a distinct influence on the American artist, Stephen Parrish.[5]

Examples[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Luther College "719 Luther College". Retrieved 26 March 2015. 
  2. ^ "Art Experts, Adolphe Appian". Retrieved 26 March 2015. 
  3. ^ "19thC. French School, Adolphe Appian". Retrieved 26 March 2015. 
  4. ^ Fine Art Museums of San Francisco
  5. ^ Laurence S. Cutler et al, Maxfield Parrish and the American Imagists, Chartwell Books Inc., p. 2007, p. 26