Adrian Gilbert Scott

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Adrian Gilbert Scott
Born 6 August 1882
Died 23 April 1963(1963-04-23) (aged 80)
Nationality English
Alma mater Beaumont College
Buildings
St Joseph RC Church, Harrow
Our Lady of Beauchief and St Thomas of Canterbury, Sheffield
All Saints Cathedral, Cairo
SS Mary & Joseph RC Church, Lansbury
St Joseph's, Upton
St Leonard's Church, St Leonards-on-Sea
Projects Aylseford Priory
Tower for The Holy Name Church Manchester
St. Mary and St. Joseph Church

Adrian Gilbert Scott (6 August 1882 – 23 April 1963) was an English ecclesiastical architect.

Biography[edit]

Scott was the grandson of Sir George Gilbert Scott, son of George Gilbert Scott, Jr., nephew of John Oldrid Scott, and the younger [1] brother to Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, all architects.

He was educated at Beaumont College, Old Windsor, as was his brother Giles, and designed the large war memorial still in the grounds of the college. He assisted his brother on a range of projects, including Liverpool Anglican Cathedral.[2]

His early work includes his design of the school chapel at Mount St Mary's College in Spinkhill, South Yorkshire, which was completed in 1924, St Joseph RC Church, Harrow (1929–31)[3] and the RC Church of Our Lady of Beauchief & St Thomas[4] in Sheffield in 1932.

His work on the Anglican Cathedral in Cairo began in 1933[2] and it was consecrated in 1938.[5] This building was demolished in 1970 to make way for the building of a new Nile bridge (see Episcopal Church in Jerusalem and the Middle East).

Scott embraced gothic and modernist designs, and he travelled to Canada in the course of his work. He started work on an altar at Saint Augustine Church in 1938; as of 2006, it is unfinished. He is also remembered for his design of the tower at The Holy Name Church Manchester.

He was also responsible for the design of SS Mary and Joseph Roman Catholic Church in the early 1950s, a major building in the post-war Lansbury Estate in Poplar, East London,.[6][7] On the Wirral he designed St Joseph's at Upton[3] and had the principal responsibility (in collaboration with his brother Giles) for the design of the rebuilt St Leonard's Church, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex (1953–61).[8] New building on the site of the Aylseford Priory (1958-1965) is his work too.[9][10]

Works[edit]

  • School Chapel at Mount St Mary's College in Spinkhill, South Yorkshire (1924)
  • Christ the King Church, Wimbledon Park, London (1926-1928)
  • Tower for the RC Church of the Holy Name of Jesus, Manchester (1928)
  • RC Church of St Joseph, Harrow (1929–31)
  • Own home, Shepherd's Well, Frognall Way, Hampstead, London (1930)
  • RC Church of Our Lady of Beauchief & St Thomas of Canterbury, Sheffield (1931–32)
  • Anglican Cathedral of All Saints' Cathedral, Cairo, 1932-38 (demolished in 1978 to make way for a new Nile bridge)
  • collaboration with Reynolds & Scott architects: RC Church of St Willibrords, Manchester (1937-8)
  • RC Church ofSt Mary and St Joseph, Lansbury Estate, Poplar, London E14 (1951–54)
  • RC Church of St Joseph, Upton (1953–54)
  • collaboration with Giles Gilbert Scott: RC Church of St Leonard, St Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex (1953–61)
  • Aylesford Priory (1958–65)
  • St Alban, Holborn, London (1959–61)
  • G.K. Chesterton memorial tower to complete the RC Church of St Teresa, Beaconsfield (no date)
  • St. James Anglican Church, Vancouver (no date)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Catholic Herald Archive 8th August 1952". CatholicHerald.co.uk The Archive. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-02. 
  2. ^ a b "Adrian Gilbert Scott". Encyclopedia.com. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-02. 
  3. ^ a b "St Joseph's Parish, Upton". St Joseph's, Upton, Shrewsbury Diocese. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-02. 
  4. ^ "Our Lady of Beauchief & St Thomas". Sandtoft Tiles. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-01. 
  5. ^ "Adrian Gilbert Scott". Encyclopedia.com. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-02. 
  6. ^ Harwood 2000, pp. 7.16–7.17.
  7. ^ "St Mary & St Joseph Church E14". The Knowledge Emporium. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-02. 
  8. ^ Harwood 2000, p. 6.10.
  9. ^ "Aylseford Priory". The Tiles and Architectural Ceramics Society. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-02. 
  10. ^ "Aylseford Priory". English Priories Heritage Trail. 2012. Retrieved 2012-04-02.