Adrian Knup

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Adrian Knup
Personal information
Full name Adrian Knup
Date of birth (1968-07-02) 2 July 1968 (age 46)
Place of birth Liestal, Switzerland
Height 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in)
Playing position Striker
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1986–1988 FC Basel 40 (11)
1988–1989 FC Aarau 33 (13)
1989–1992 FC Luzern 74 (20)
1992–1994 VfB Stuttgart 53 (20)
1994–1996 Karlsruher SC 39 (11)
1996 Galatasaray SK 5 (2)
1996–1998 FC Basel 29 (8)
Total 273 (85)
National team
1989–1996 Switzerland 49 (26)
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).

Adrian Knup (born 2 July 1968 in Liestal) is a retired Swiss football striker.[1]

He was capped 49 times and scored 26 goals for the Swiss national team between 1989 and 1996, including three games at the 1994 FIFA World Cup.

Club career[edit]

Knup was a typical No. 9 and was famed for the power he could get behind his headers. He started his career at FC Basel in 1986 and joined FC Aarau in 1988. He spent only one season at Aarau and signed for FC Luzern in 1989 where he was an immediate success. In 1990 he was voted Luzern's Player of the Year. He was then signed by German Bundesliga side VfB Stuttgart in 1992 where he played until 1994 when he signed for Karlsruher SC. He reached the 1995–96 DFB-Pokal final with Karlsruhe but they were beaten 1–0 by 1. FC Kaiserslautern. He then had a short spell with Galatasaray SK in Turkey before returning to Basel and retiring in 1998.

International career[edit]

He played for the Switzerland national football team between 1989 and 1996. He scored 26 goals in 49 games. Two of his goals came against Romania in a 4–1 win at the 1994 FIFA World Cup in the USA.

After his retirement from playing, he became a commentator for Swiss League matches. On 25 May 2007, he was given the job as a coach for the Swiss national team but left after UEFA Euro 2008.

International goals[edit]

Scores and results list Switzerland's goal tally first.
# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 11 October 1989 St. Jakob-Park, Basel  Belgium 1–0 2–2 1990 World Cup qualifier
2. 13 December 1989 Estadio Heliodoro Rodríguez López, Santa Cruz  Spain 1–1 1–2 Friendly
3. 2 June 1990 Espenmoos, St. Gallen  United States 2–1 2–1 Friendly
4. 21 August 1990 Praterstadion, Vienna  Austria 3–1 3–1 Friendly
5. 17 October 1990 Hampden Park, Glasgow  Scotland 1–2 1–2 Euro 1992 qualifier
6. 14 November 1990 Stadio Olimpico, Serravalle  San Marino 3–0 4–0 Euro 1992 qualifier
7. 2 February 1991 Miami Orange Bowl, Miami  United States 1–0 1–0 Friendly
8. 12 March 1991 Sportplatz Rheinau, Balzers  Liechtenstein 2–0 6–0 Friendly
9. 3–0
10. 5–0
11. 1 May 1991 Vasil Levski National Stadium, Sofia  Bulgaria 1–2 3–2 Euro 1992 qualifier
12. 2–2
13. 5 June 1991 Espenmoos, St. Gallen  San Marino 1–0 7–0 Euro 1992 qualifier
14. 6–0
15. 16 August 1992 Kadrioru Stadium, Tallinn  Estonia 3–0 6–0 1994 World Cup qualifier
16. 4–0
17. 9 September 1992 Wankdorfstadion, Bern  Scotland 1–0 3–1 1994 World Cup qualifier
18. 2–1
19. 17 March 1993 Stade El Menzah, Tunis  Tunisia 1–0 1–0 Friendly
20. 11 August 1993 Ryavallen, Borås  Sweden 1–1 2–1 Friendly
21. 17 November 1993 Hardturm, Zurich  Estonia 1–0 4–0 1994 World Cup qualifier
22. 22 June 1994 Pontiac Silverdome, Pontiac  Romania 3–1 4–1 1994 World Cup
23. 4–1
24. 23 June 1995 Wankdorfstadion, Bern  Germany 1–1 1–2 Friendly
25. 16 August 1995 Laugardalsvollur, Reykjavík  Iceland 1–0 2–0 Euro 1996 qualifier
26. 15 November 1995 Wembley Stadium, London  England 1–0 1–3 Friendly

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Adrian Knup". worldfootball.net. Retrieved 11 March 2012. 

External links[edit]