Adrian Quist

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Adrian Quist
Adrian Quist 02.jpg
Full name Adrian Karl Quist
Country  Australia
Born (1913-01-23)23 January 1913
Medindie, South Australia
Died 17 November 1991(1991-11-17) (aged 78)
Sydney, NSW, Australia
Turned pro 1930 (amateur tour)
Retired 1955
Plays Right-handed (1-handed backhand)
Int. Tennis HOF 1984 (member page)
Singles
Career titles 19
Highest ranking No. 3 (1939, Gordon Lowe)[1]
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open W (1936, 1940, 1948)
French Open 4R (1935)
Wimbledon QF (1936)
US Open QF (1933)
Doubles
Grand Slam Doubles results
Australian Open W (1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950)
French Open W (1935)
Wimbledon W (1935, 1950)
US Open W (1939)
Team competitions
Davis Cup W (1939)

Adrian Karl Quist (23 January 1913[2] – 17 November 1991) was an Australian tennis player.

Biography[edit]

Adrian Quist was born in Medindie, South Australia. His father was Karl Quist, who had been a noted interstate cricketer, and owned a sporting goods store at the time of his son's birth.[3] The tennis legend grew up in Adelaide and once played Harry Hopman, but lost, having given Hopman a head start. He was a three-time Australian Championships men's singles champion but is primarily remembered today as a great doubles player. He won the Australian doubles title 10 years in a row, the last eight together with John Bromwich and he was also one of the winners of a "Career Doubles Slam". Quist was ranked World No. 3 in 1939 and World No. 4 in 1936.[1][4]

In his 1979 autobiography tennis great Jack Kramer writes that in doubles "Quist played the backhand court. He had a dink backhand that was better for doubles than singles, and a classic forehand drive with a natural sink. He was also fine at the net, volley and forehand."

Quist was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, Rhode Island, in 1984.

Adrian Quist also held the most Davis Cup victories by any Australian until Lleyton Hewitt surpassed that record on 18 September 2010 in Cairns.

He died in Sydney, New South Wales in 1991, aged 78.[5]

Adrian Quist is the uncle of celebrated fashion designer Neville Quist, founding director of Saville Row.

Grand Slam record[edit]

Adrian Quist hitting a low volley in the 1930s
  • Australian Championships
    • Singles champion (3): 1936, 1940, 1948
    • Singles finalist (1): 1939
    • Doubles champion (10): 1936, 1937, 1938, 1939, 1940, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950
    • Doubles finalist (2): 1934, 1951
  • French Championships
    • Doubles champion (1): 1935
    • Doubles finalist (1): 1933
    • Mixed finalist (1): 1934

Grand Slam singles finals[edit]

Wins (3)[edit]

Year Championship Opponent in Final Score
1936 Australian Championships Flag of Australia.svg Jack Crawford 6–2, 6–3, 4–6, 3–6, 9–7
1940 Australian Championships (2) Flag of Australia.svg Jack Crawford 6–3, 6–1, 6–2
1948 Australian Championships (3) Flag of Australia.svg John Bromwich 6–4, 3–6, 6–3, 2–6, 6–3

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b United States Lawn Tennis Association (1972). Official Encyclopedia of Tennis (First Edition), p. 425.
  2. ^ Davis Cup, Australian Open. Note: The birthdate 4 August 1913 appears in some sources.
  3. ^ Victor Richardson - Cricket, Baseball, Australian Football, Golf, Tennis – Sport Australia Hall of Fame. Retrieved 1 December 2012.
  4. ^ "Wallis Myers' Rankings", The Age, 24 September 1936.
  5. ^ "Adrian Quist, 78, Tennis Champion" (PDF). The New York Times. 20 November 1991. 

External links[edit]