Adult Alternative Songs

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Adult Alternative Songs, also known as Triple A, is a record chart currently published by Billboard that ranks the most popular songs on adult album alternative radio stations. The 30-position chart is formulated based on each song's weekly radio spins, as measured by Nielsen Broadcast Data Systems.[1] Initially published by Billboard sister publication Radio & Records[2] as the Adult Alternative Top 30 Tracks chart,[3] it debuted on the week of January 20, 1996.[4] For much of its early existence Adult Alternative Songs was compiled using Mediabase data,[5] until Radio & Records was acquired by Billboard parent company VNU Media[6] and Nielsen Broadcast Data Systems replaced Mediabase in monitoring airplay for the chart.[7]

Billboard debuted their Triple A chart in the issue dated July 5, 2008 through their Billboard.biz website,[8] appropriating the same airplay data as Radio & Records.[2] Radio & Records later closed in June 2009, leaving Billboard as the sole publisher of the chart.[9] In February 2014, the chart's reporting panel was expanded from 23 to 32 stations, including non-commercial reporters for the first time.[10] The current number-one single, as of the chart for the week ending July 19, 2014, is "Stay with Me" by Sam Smith.[11]

Chart achievements[edit]

  • Artists with the most number-one songs:[10][12]
Coldplay (11)
U2 (11)
Jack Johnson (9)
Dave Matthews Band (9)
Sheryl Crow (7)
Counting Crows (7)
R.E.M. (7)
  • Most weeks at number one:
16 weeks
"Beautiful Day" – U2 (2000–01)[13]
15 weeks
"Clocks" – Coldplay (2003)[13]
14 weeks
"Rolling in the Deep" – Adele (2011)[14]
13 weeks
"Just Breathe" – Pearl Jam (2010)[15]
"Somebody That I Used to Know" – Gotye featuring Kimbra (2012)[16]
12 weeks
"Funny the Way It Is" – Dave Matthews Band (2009)[17]
11 weeks
"Viva la Vida" – Coldplay (2008)[18]
"You and Your Heart" – Jack Johnson (2010)[15]
"I Will Wait" – Mumford & Sons (2012)[16]
10 weeks
"If I Had Eyes" – Jack Johnson (2008)[18]
"Fugitive" – David Gray (2010)[17]
"Fever" – The Black Keys (2014)[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Triple A". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media). Retrieved May 13, 2014. (subscription required (help)). 
  2. ^ a b Shipley, Al (October 9, 2008). "'Billboard' Breaks Down, Dials Up Triple-A". Idolator. Spin Media. Retrieved May 13, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Adult Alternative Top 30 Tracks". Radio & Records (Radio & Records, Inc.): 134. March 7, 1997. Retrieved May 13, 2014. 
  4. ^ Trust, Gary (July 17, 2012). "Triple A Radio Breaking Rookie Stars". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media). Retrieved May 13, 2014. 
  5. ^ "Adult Alternative Top 30". Radio & Records (Radio & Records, Inc.): 112. March 23, 2001. Retrieved May 17, 2014. 
  6. ^ "VNU To Acquire Radio & Records". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media). July 6, 2006. Retrieved May 17, 2014. 
  7. ^ Tucker, Ken (September 21, 2006). "Nielsen BDS Expands Service". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media). Retrieved May 17, 2014. 
  8. ^ Mayfield, Geoff (July 12, 2008). "Billboard's Charts Get Makeover; Price Matters". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media) 120 (28): 37. Retrieved May 13, 2014. 
  9. ^ Trust, Gary (June 10, 2009). "Chart Beat: Pink, Black Eyed Peas, Shinedown". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media). Retrieved June 28, 2013. 
  10. ^ a b Trust, Gary (February 21, 2014). "Billboard's Triple A Chart Gets a Makeover". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media). Retrieved May 13, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b "Adult Alternative Songs – 2014 Archive". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved June 24, 2014. 
  12. ^ Trust, Gary (April 11, 2014). "Chart Moves: Coldplay Ties U2's No. 1 Record; Sam Smith Hits Hot 100 Post-'SNL'; The Pretty Reckless Ties Joan Jett For Mainstream Rock History". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media). Retrieved May 5, 2014. 
  13. ^ a b Trust, Gary (July 22, 2009). "Chart Beat Wednesday: Coldplay, Kings Of Leon, Billy Currington". Billboard (Prometheus Global Media). Retrieved May 18, 2014. 
  14. ^ "Adult Alternative Songs – 2011 Archive". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved March 1, 2014. 
  15. ^ a b "Adult Alternative Songs – 2010 Archive". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved March 1, 2014. 
  16. ^ a b "Adult Alternative Songs – 2012 Archive". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved March 1, 2014. 
  17. ^ a b "Adult Alternative Songs – 2009 Archive". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved March 1, 2014. 
  18. ^ a b "Adult Alternative Songs – 2008 Archive". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Retrieved March 1, 2014. 

External links[edit]