Advocates Library

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The Advocates Library, founded in 1682, is the law library of the Faculty of Advocates, in Edinburgh.[1] Until 1925 it was the national deposit library of Scotland, after which the role was taken on by the National Library of Scotland. All the non-legal collections were given to the National Library. Today, it alone of the Scottish libraries still holds the privilege of receiving a copy of every law book entered at Stationers' Hall.

The library forms part of the complex that includes Parliament House, located on the Royal Mile.

History[edit]

The Library was formally opened in 1689. It was an initiative of George Mackenzie.[2]

The present library building was designed by William Henry Playfair in 1830, and is a category A listed building.[3]

Librarian Samuel Halkett began an ambitious catalogue, based on the rules of John Winter Jones for the British Museum catalogue of 1839, but with extensive biographical information on authors. It was published in six volumes, from 1858 to 1878.[4] Halkett's successor, Thomas Hill Jamieson, met a fire that damaged some thousands of books on 9 March 1875.[5]

Keepers[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  • Patrick Cadell and Ann Matheson, editors (1989), For the Encouragement of Learning: Scotland's National Library 1689–1989, Edinburgh, HMSO.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Brewer, E. Cobham (1978 (reprint of 1894 version)). The Dictionary of Phrase and Fable. Edwinstowe, England: Avenel Books. p. 17. ISBN 0-517-25921-4. 
  2. ^ Jackson, Clare. "Mackenzie, Sir George, of Rosehaugh". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/17579.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  3. ^ "Advocates' Library". Historic Scotland. Retrieved 3 April 2012. 
  4. ^ Cadell & Matheson, pp. 211–2.
  5. ^ Brown, Iain Gordon. "Jamieson, Thomas Hill". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/14644.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l Cadell & Matheson, pp. 292–6.
  7. ^ "Spottiswoode, John". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/26168.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  8. ^ Cadell & Matheson, p. 41.
  9. ^ Oz-Salzberger, Fania. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/9315.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  10. ^ Ovenden, Richard. Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/14472.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  11. ^ Brown, Iain Gordon. "Jamieson, Thomas Hill". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/14644.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)
  12. ^ http://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/cgi-bin/paperspast?a=d&d=OW19060307.2.51&l=mi&e=-------10--1----2--
  13. ^ Bell, Alan. "Dickson, William Kirk". Oxford Dictionary of National Biography (online ed.). Oxford University Press. doi:10.1093/ref:odnb/72368.  (Subscription or UK public library membership required.)

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 55°56′56″N 3°11′29″W / 55.94889°N 3.19139°W / 55.94889; -3.19139