Aeroflot accidents and incidents in the 1960s

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Aeroflot accidents and incidents in the 1960s
Aeroflot Il-18V CCCP-75880 PIK Late 1960s.png
An Ilyushin Il-18V, similar to the one involved in the deadliest accident the carrier experienced during the decade, is seen here at Glasgow Prestwick Airport in the late 1960s.

Following is a list of accidents and incidents Aeroflot experienced in the 1960s. The deadliest event the Soviet Union's flag carrier went through in the decade occurred in November 1967 (1967-11), when an Ilyushin Il-18V crashed upside down shortly after takeoff from Koltsovo Airport in Sverdlovsk, then located in the Russian SSR, killing all 130 occupants on board,[1] prompting the temporary grounding of the type within the airline's fleet. In terms of fatalities, the accident ranks as the worst one involving an Il-18, as of March 2012.[2] Another aircraft of the type was involved in the second deadliest accident the airline experienced in the decade, this time in February 1968 (1968-02), when 90 people were killed following the break up of the airframe, during an emergency descent, off Bratsk. The decade was also marked by the only deadly accident experienced by a Tupolev Tu-114, which entered commercial service on the MoscowKhabarovsk route in April 1961 (1961-04).[3][4]

The number of recorded fatalities aboard Aeroflot aircraft during the decade rose to 1601; likewise, 105 of its aircraft were written off in accidents or incidents, split into six Antonov An-10s, 12 Antonov An-12s, seven Antonov An-2s, 9 Antonov An-24s, one Avia 14P, 14 Ilyushin Il-14s, 31 Ilyushin Il-18s, five Lisunov Li-2s, 14 Tupolev Tu-104s, two Tupolev Tu-114s, and four Tupolev Tu-124s. Most of the fatal accidents took place within the borders of the Soviet Union. The reluctance the Soviet government had for publicly admitting the occurrence of such events might render these figures higher, as fatal events tended to be admitted only when there were foreigners aboard the crashed aircraft, the accident took place in a foreign country, or they reached the news for some reason.[5]

List[edit]

Date Location Aircraft Tail number Airline division Aircraft damage Fatalities Description Refs
19 February 1960 Unknown An-2 CCCP-98332 Yakut W/O Unknown Emergency landing. [6]
26 February 1960 Soviet UnionLvov An-10A CCCP-11180 Ukraine W/O 32/33 Crashed on approach to Snilow Airport, 1,400 metres (4,600 ft) ahead of the runway threshold, in icing conditions. It was completing a domestic scheduled Kiev–Lvov passenger service as Flight 315. [7]
27 April 1960 Soviet UnionSverdlovsk Il-18A CCCP-75648 Ural W/O 1/5 Crashed on approach to Koltsovo Airport during a training flight. [8]
20 July 1960 Soviet UnionOff Syktyvkar Il-14M CCCP-61696 Komi W/O 23/23 It was operating a domestic scheduled Leningrad–Syktyvkar passenger service as Flight 613 when it encountered heavy turbulence on its flight path and broke up, crashing 100 kilometres (62 mi) off the destination city. [9][10]
17 August 1960 Soviet UnionKiev Il-18B CCCP-75705 Moscow W/O 34/34 A fire that started in the outer starboard engine spread to the wing and reached the fuel tanks, which exploded. The aircraft crashed near Kiev; it was operating an international scheduled CairoMoscow passenger service as Flight 36. [11][12]
21 August 1960 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown 1 Hijacking episode. [13]
2 September 1960 Soviet UnionZikhnovo Il-14 CCCP-04200 Polar W/O 18/18 The aircraft was operating a non-scheduled passenger service carrying researchers from Mys Schmidta back to Moscow, when it crashed into mountainous terrain in bad weather while en route from Arkhangelsk to Cherepovets, 8 kilometres (5.0 mi) away from Zikhnovo. [14]
21 October 1960 Soviet UnionUst-Orda Tu-104A CCCP-42452 Far East W/O 3/68 The aircraft was operating a scheduled Moscow-Omsk-Irkutsk-Khabarovsk passenger service as Flight 5. While en route to Irkutsk, the aircraft diverted to Ust-Orda due to bad weather. The crew aborted the approach after the nose gear landing light malfunctioned. The pilot initiated a left turn to climb but the aircraft struck sloping terrain and caught fire. [15]
4 December 1960 Soviet UnionChernovo Il-14 CCCP-52091 Komi W/O 14/14 Experienced a fire in the starboard engine while en route a domestic scheduled Syktyvkar–Moscow passenger service as Flight 61. This situation prompted the flightcrew to initiate a descent for an emergency landing, in which the wing broke off. The aircraft crashed near Chernovo. [16][17]
26 December 1960 Soviet UnionUlyanovsk Il-18A CCCP-75651 Moscow W/O 3 The aircraft was on a training flight and had departed from Kuybyshev Airport bound for Ulyanovsk Airport. It crashed on approach to the latter airport, possibly due to icing. [18]
1 February 1961 Soviet UnionVladivostok Tu-104A CCCP-42357 Moscow W/O 0 Overshot the runway due to a long touchdown at Vladivostok Airport. [19]
16 March 1961 Soviet UnionSverdlovsk Tu-104B CCCP-42438 West Siberia W/O 5/51 The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Khabarovsk-Sverdlovsk-Leningrad passenger service as Flight 68. The right engine failed shortly after takeoff. The crew were unable to determine which engine failed because they could not read the instruments due to severe vibration. A crew member manipulated the left engine throttle to attempt to hear the difference in engine power to determine which engine had failed, but the engine was shut down by mistake. The aircraft lost altitude and the crew made a forced landing on a frozen pond. Two people on the ground died when a home was destroyed. [20]
22 June 1961 Soviet UnionBogoroditsk Il-18B CCCP-75672 Moscow W/O 0/97 Belly landed in a field following a fire in the inner starboard engine that was not extinguished. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Moscow-Sochi service. [21]
8 July 1961 Soviet UnionSosnovy Bor Il-14P CCCP-41848 Ukraine W/O 9/26 Crashed due to fuel exhaustion after the crew failed to refuel before takeoff. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Kazan-Sverdlovsk passenger service as Flight 411. [22]
10 July 1961 Soviet UnionOdessa Tu-104B CCCP-42447 Northern W/O 1/94 Encountered downdrafts and struck approach lights on final approach to Odessa Airport in heavy rain. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Leningrad-Odessa passenger service as Flight 381. [23]
28 July 1961 Soviet UnionLukhovitsy Il-18V CCCP-75766 Unknown W/O 0 Engine flameout during a test flight. Crash-landed at Lukhovitsy Tretyakovo Airport. [24]
13 August 1961 Soviet UnionRiga Il-18B CCCP-75653 Moscow W/O 0 Overshot the runway on landing at Riga International Airport in fog. [25]
17 September 1961 Soviet UnionTashkent Tu-104A CCCP-42388 Uzbekistan W/O 0 Hard landing at Tashkent Airport. [26]
22 September 1961 Soviet UnionOymyakon Li-2 CCCP-16154 Yakut W/O 6/6 Crashed 95 kilometres (59 mi) away from Oymyakon after running out of fuel. The aircraft was operating a Yakutsk-Oymyakon cargo service. [27]
31 October 1961 Soviet UnionSmorodinny Il-14M CCCP-61712 Yakut W/O 5/5 The aircraft was operating a YakutskSangar cargo service. The flightcrew mistook the lights of Smorodinny for the lights of the destination city during a power blackout there. It descended until 150 metres (490 ft), where it crashed into mountainous terrain. [28]
2 November 1961 Soviet UnionVladivostok Tu-104B CCCP-42504 Far East W/O 0 Made an emergency landing following an engine failure after hitting an antenna on approach to Vladivostok Airport. [29]
17 December 1961 Soviet UnionChebotovka Il-18B CCCP-75654 Moscow W/O 59/59 Crashed 10 kilometres (6.2 mi) off Chebotovka, after the flight engineer inadvertently modified the position of the flaps at a cruising altitude of 8,000 metres (26,000 ft), causing the aircraft to dive uncontrollably. The aircraft was en route a domestic scheduled Moscow–Sochi passenger service as Flight 245. [30]
18 December 1961 Soviet UnionOlyokminsk Li-2 CCCP-84603 Yakut W/O 4 Crashed. [31]
31 December 1961 Soviet UnionMineralnye Vody Il-18V CCCP-75757 Armenia W/O 32/119 The aircraft was operating a non-scheduled Tbilisi-Mineralnye Vody passenger service. It was one of two Il-18's chartered to pick up passengers in Tbilisi who had been stranded for several days due to bad weather. The boarding process was disorganized, with tickets not being checked. The aircraft was also overloaded. While on approach at 250 m (820 ft), the crew reported that they did not see the runway or approach lights. The pilot aborted the approach and made a go-around. The aircraft turned to the right and crashed in hilly terrain. [32]
27 January 1962 Soviet UnionUlyanovsk An-10A CCCP-11148 Ulyanovsk Flight School W/O 13/14 Shortly after takeoff from Baratayevka Airport on a training flight, the outer starboard engine did not feather during initial climb out, causing the aircraft to bank right and lose speed, eventually crashing into the ground 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) off the airport. [33]
15 April 1962 Soviet UnionKarpun Mountain An-2 CCCP-23700 Magadan W/O 0/2 The aircraft was being ferried from Palyavaam to Pevek. The crew did not follow the Palyavaam River but deviated to the left by 12 km (7.5 mi) and flew into the side of a mountain. [34]
11 May 1962 Soviet UnionMagadan An-2R CCCP-49262 Magadan W/O Unknown Crashed while crop-spraying. [35]
4 June 1962 BulgariaSofia Tu-104B CCCP-42491 Moscow W/O 5/5 Experienced the failure of the port engine shortly after takeoff from Vrazhdebna Airport, prompting the flightcrew to land the aircraft back in the airport of departure. In doing so, the airplane flew too low through clouds and crashed into mountainous terrain, 30 kilometres (19 mi) northeast of the airport. Due to operate a Sofia–Moscow cargo service. [36]
30 June 1962 Soviet UnionVoznesenka Tu-104A CCCP-42370 Far East W/O 84/84 Accidentally shot down by a training missile while en route from Irkutsk to Omsk as Flight 902. [37][38]
6 July 1962 Soviet UnionOff Tashkent Il-14 CCCP-91554 Uzbekistan W/O 14/38 The aircraft was completing a domestic scheduled Bukhara–Tashkent passenger service as Flight 40, when the starboard wing broke off after hitting a fence, following the loss of height amid an engine failure, causing the aircraft to crash 34 kilometres (21 mi) away from Tashkent Airport. [39][40]
28 July 1962 Soviet UnionSochi An-10A CCCP-11186 Ukraine W/O 81/81 Crashed at 2,000 feet (610 m) into a mountain while on approach to Sochi Airport in clouds, inbound from Simferopol as Flight 415. [41]
August 1962 Soviet UnionMoscow Tu-114D CCCP-76479 Moscow W/O 0/0 Nosegear retraction while standing on the apron at Vnukovo Airport undergoing maintenance. [42]
3 September 1962 Soviet UnionOff Khabarovsk Tu-104A CCCP-42366 Far East W/O 86/86 The aircraft became uncontrollable after rolling and yawing several times at an altitude of 4,500 metres (14,800 ft). Crashed in a swamp, some 90 kilometres (56 mi) away from Khabarovsk. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Khabarovsk–Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky passenger service as Flight 3. [43]
25 October 1962 Soviet UnionMoscow Tu-104B CCCP-42495 Moscow W/O 10/10 On a test flight, the aircraft crashed at Sheremetyevo Airport upon takeoff. The rudder controls were apparently cross-connected. [44][45]
29 November 1962 Unknown Il-18V CCCP-75843 Moscow W/O Unknown Crashed. [46]
8 February 1963 Soviet UnionSyktyvkar An-10A CCCP-11193 Komi W/O 7/7 Stalled and crashed upon takeoff, following the icing of the intake in three of the engines. [47]
26 February 1963 Soviet UnionBukhta Yemlinskaya Il-18V CCCP-75732 Polar W/O 10/10 The aircraft was operating a Cape Schmidt-Anadyr-Magadan cargo service. While en route to Magadan both left side engines failed at 7,000 metres (23,000 ft). The crew made an emergency landing on the icy surface of Shelikhov Gulf near Bukhta Yemlinskaya. The aircraft was destroyed and sank. Three occupants survived the crash but later died in the below-zero temperatures. [48]
5 March 1963 Soviet UnionAshgabat Il-18V CCCP-75765 Turkmenistan W/O 16/55 Inbound from Krasnovodsk as Flight 191, struck power lines on approach to Ashgabat Airport, crashed some 300–200 metres (980–660 ft) short of the runway, broke up, and caught fire. [49]
2 April 1963 Soviet UnionMagadan An-12 CCCP-11338 Polar W/O 0 Ran off the snowy runway at Magadan Airport after the pilot failed to correctly align the aircraft for takeoff. [50]
4 April 1963 Soviet UnionUrakhcha Il-18 CCCP-75866 Krasnoyarsk W/O 67/67 There was a failure in the pitch control mechanism of one of the starboard engines while en route a domestic scheduled Moscow–Krasnoyarsk passenger service as Flight 25. Unable to determine which of the propellers were causing the drag forces, the flightcrew decided to feather both of them, causing the aircraft to enter a high speed descent in which the elevators broke off. The airplane crashed 3.5 kilometres (2.2 mi) southwest of Urakhcha. [51]
18 May 1963 Soviet UnionLeningrad Tu-104B CCCP-42483 Northern W/O 0 Stalled on approach to Smolnoye Airport and crashed 1.5 kilometres (0.93 mi) off the airfield. [52]
13 July 1963 Soviet UnionIrkutsk Tu-104B CCCP-42492 Moscow W/O 32/32 Crashed 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) short of the runway on final approach to Irkutsk Airport, inbound from Beijing. The aircraft was completing the first leg of an international scheduled Beijing-Irkutsk-Tirana passenger service as Flight 12 and made a premature descent. [53][54]
21 August 1963 Soviet UnionLeningrad Tu-124 CCCP-45021 Moscow W/O 0/52 Ditched in the Neva River after both engines stopped. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Tallinn-Moscow passenger service. [55]
24 August 1963 Soviet UnionKutaisi Avia 14P CCCP-61617 Georgia W/O 32/32 Crashed into a hillside 32 kilometres (20 mi) northwest of Kutaisi Airport, 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) off the intended course. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Kutaisi–Sukhumi passenger service as Flight 663. [56]
20 October 1963 Soviet UnionGraham Bell Island Il-14M CCCP-04197 Polar W/O 7/7 Flew into the slope of a glacier during a survey flight; the crew lost spatial orientation in the polar night. [57]
10 November 1963 Soviet UnionKuybyshev Il-18B CCCP-75686 Moscow W/O Unknown Unknown [58]
7 December 1963 Soviet UnionKirensk An-12B CCCP-11347 East Siberia W/O 6/6 Lost control and crashed when both port propellers could not be feathered following fuel line problems. The aircraft was operating a Kirensk-Irkutsk cargo service as Flight 1076. [59]
3 January 1964 Soviet UnionBatagay An-2 CCCP-23740 Yakutsk W/O 2/2 Crashed short of the runway during a night time training flight. [60]
9 June 1964 Soviet UnionNovosibirsk Tu-104B CCCP-42476 West Siberia W/O Unknown Overshot the runway on landing at Tolmachevo Airport in adverse weather. [60]
2 July 1964 Soviet UnionKrasnodar Il-18B CCCP-75661 Moscow W/O Unknown Unknown [61]
3 August 1964 Soviet UnionMagadan Il-18V CCCP-75824 Moscow W/O Unknown Collapse of landing gear following a short touchdown at Magadan Airport. [62]
2 September 1964 Soviet UnionYuzhno-Sakhalinsk Il-18V CCCP-75531 Krasnoyarsk W/O 87/93 Crashed into a hillside at 2,000 feet (610 m) while on approach to Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk Airport, inbound from Khabarovsk as Flight 721, following a premature descent. [63]
28 November 1964 Soviet UnionSurami Il-14P CCCP-41883 Georgia W/O 7/15 The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Tbilisi–Kutaisi–Krasnodar passenger service as Flight F-51. While en route it first leg, it crashed at 980 metres (3,220 ft) into a mountain, near Surami, after the actual airspeed was incorrectly reported to the flightcrew and a descent was initiated still over mountainous terrain, amid a cloudy environment. [64]
3 January 1965 Soviet UnionAlma-Ata Il-18B CCCP-75685 Kazakhstan W/O 64/103 While on approach to Alma-Ata, the aircraft deviated to the right. Air traffic control instructed the pilot to perform a go-around, but the pilot continued the approach. The aircraft crashed 75 m (246 ft) short of the runway, crossed a ditch, and struck trees. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Moscow-Omsk-Semipalatinsk-Alma Ata passenger service as Flight 101. [65]
8 March 1965 Soviet UnionKuybyshev Tu-124V CCCP-45028 Moscow W/O 25/25 Crashed shortly after takeoff from Kuybyshev Airport after the pilots lost control of the aircraft during climb out. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Kuybyshev–Moscow passenger service as Flight 448. [66]
20 March 1965 Soviet UnionKhanty-Mansiysk An-24 CCCP-46764 Ural W/O 43/47 Undershot the runway on landing at Khanty-Mansiysk Airport inbound from Tyumen, breaking up after hitting a snowdrift, and catching fire. [67]
11 September 1965 Soviet UnionUlan-Ude An-12 CCCP-11337 Polar W/O 8/8 The aircraft was operating a Tashkent-Fergana-Novosibirsk-Krasnoyarsk-Irkutsk-Yuzhno Sakhalinsk cargo service. The crew diverted to Ulan-Ude after the airport at Irkutsk was closed due to poor weather. The crew did not set the altimeter correctly, causing false readings. The aircraft crashed into a wooded mountain side at 1,200 m (3,900 ft). [68]
11 November 1965 Soviet UnionMurmansk Tu-124V CCCP-45086 Northern W/O 32/64 The aircraft was completing a domestic scheduled Moscow–Murmansk passenger service as Flight 99 when it crashed 2.6 kilometres (1.6 mi) off Murmansk Airport, on approach. The pilot mistook lights near the Middle Marker Beacon for runway lights and began descending, but by the time the pilots noticed the mistake, it was too late. The aircraft crashed on a frozen lake. [69]
16 November 1965 Soviet UnionUst-Maya[nb 1] An-2 CCCP-01189 Yakut W/O Unknown Main undercarriage broke off upon landing. [70]
23 December 1965 Soviet UnionMagadan Il-18B CCCP-75688 Moscow W/O 0 The airframe sustained irreparable damages when it dived from 8,000 metres (26,000 ft). [71]
31 December 1965 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown 1 Hijacking episode. [72]
1 January 1966 Soviet UnionPetropavlovsk-Kamchatsky Il-14P CCCP-61618 Magadan W/O 23/23 While flying at 3,300 m (10,800 ft), the right engine failed. The crew considered diverting to Sobolevo but the runway was covered in snow and decided to continue. The aircraft started to gradually lose altitude and was at 2,900 m (9,500 ft) after passing Sobolevo. The co-pilot suggested a wheels-up landing at Ust-Bolsheretsk, but the pilot again decided to continue. The aircraft cleared high terrain but flew into poor weather. The aircraft lost altitude until it struck a mountain at 2,049 m (6,722 ft). The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Magadan-Petropavlovsk Kamchatsky passenger service. [73]
16 February 1966 Soviet UnionPechora Il-14M CCCP-52058 Komi W/O 35/35 Experienced a fire in one of the engines while en route a domestic scheduled Vorkuta–Syktyvkar passenger service as Flight 302. The crew attempted to divert the aircraft to Pechora after the fire could not be extinguished, but the burning engine detached from the wing, causing the aircraft to bank left, crashing moments later into a forest, 70 kilometres (43 mi) north of the city. [74][75]
17 February 1966 Soviet UnionMoscow Tu-114D CCCP-76491 International W/O 21/48 Struck a snowdrift with the port main landing gear upon takeoff from Sheremetyevo Airport. The pilot maneuvered the aircraft so as to bank it to the right, causing the inner starboard propeller to hit the ground. The airplane, due to inaugurate the MoscowConakryAccraBrazzaville service as Flight 65, crashed and caught fire. This was the only fatal accident involving a Tu-114. [76][77][78][79][80]
23 April 1966 Soviet UnionOff Baku Il-14 CCCP-61772 Azerbaijan W/O 33/33 Ditched into the Caspian Sea, south of Baku, when an emergency landing was attempted at Bina International Airport, following an engine failure that was reported shortly after the flight departed the airport. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Baku–Makhachkala passenger service as Flight 2723. The wreckage of the aircraft was never recovered. [81]
27 August 1966 Soviet UnionArkhangelsk Il-18V CCCP-75552 Latvia W/O 0/121 Overran the runway on takeoff with a locked rudder at Arkhangelsk Airport. The aircraft was due to operate a domestic scheduled Arkhangelsk-Leningrad passenger service as Flight 3772. [82]
22 November 1966 Soviet UnionAlma-Ata Il-18B CCCP-75665 Kazakhstan W/O 2/68 The aircraft was due to operate a domestic scheduled Alma Ata-Semipalatinsk-Moscow passenger service as Flight X-19. During the takeoff roll at Alma-Ata Airport the number three engine was shut down and its propeller feathered, due to malfunction. The takeoff was continued but the aircraft veered off the runway to the right. The aircraft then got briefly airborne at a high angle of attack until the tail struck a 70 cm (28 in) mound. The aircraft then struck a shore of a river and came to a rest on a hillside. [83]
14 January 1967 Soviet UnionNovosibirsk An-12B CCCP-04343 Polar W/O 6/6 Crashed and exploded during an emergency landing following a fire in the cargo hold that broke out shortly after takeoff from Tolmachevo Airport. The aircraft was operating a Moscow-Novosibirsk-Krasnoyarsk-Khabarovsk cargo service as Flight 5003. [84][85]
6 March 1967 Soviet UnionSalekhard An-12B CCCP-11007 Polar W/O 5/6 The crew did not make a proper selection of the flaps before takeoff from Salekhard Airport; the aircraft stalled following rotation, crashing into the banks of the Ob River, 1.8 kilometres (1.1 mi) off the airport. Due to operate a Salekhard–Tarko-Sale cargo service. [86]
12 March 1967 Soviet UnionOff Yakutsk Il-14P CCCP-61657 Yakut W/O 15/19 One of the engines caught fire while en route an Olyokminsk–Yakutsk service as Flight 1799. The aircraft crashed after it hit trees 86 kilometres (53 mi) away from Yakutsk when the crew attempted to force-land the aircraft amid snowy weather in darkness. [87][88]
4 June 1967 Soviet UnionBlagoveshchensk An-12TP-2 CCCP-04366 Polar W/O 0 Undercarriage collapsed on landing at Blagoveshchensk Airport. [89]
29 August 1967 Unknown An-2 CCCP-42615 Komi W/O 0/2 Crash-landed and caught fire. [90]
12 October 1967 Soviet UnionAldan Li-2 CCCP-46201 Yakut W/O 4 Crashed at Aldan Airport. [91]
4 November 1967 Soviet UnionMoscow Il-18 Unknown Unknown W/O 4/4 Crash-landed. [92]
16 November 1967 Soviet UnionSverdlovsk Il-18V CCCP-75538 International W/O 130/130 One of the engines caught fire upon takeoff from Koltsovo Airport. The propeller could not be feathered, causing the aircraft to crash upside down. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Sverdlovsk–Tashkent passenger service as Flight 2230. [1][93]
30 December 1967 Soviet UnionLiepaya An-24B CCCP-46215 Latvia W/O 44/51 Inbound from Riga, the aircraft was too high above the glide scope. The crew added takeoff power and started a missed approach. At that time, the right engine lost power. The aircraft lost altitude, rolled 40 degrees to the right and crashed in a snow-covered field. The aircraft was operating a Riga-Liepaya passenger service as Flight A-51. [94][95]
31 December 1967 Soviet UnionVoronezh An-24B CCCP-46201 Moscow W/O Unknown Crashed short of the runway on approach to Voronezh Airport. [96]
6 January 1968 Soviet UnionOff Olyokma An-24B CCCP-47733 Yakut W/O 45/45 The aircraft was operating a scheduled domestic OlekminskLensk passenger service as Flight 1663, when it broke up at 4,500 metres (14,800 ft) and crashed 92 kilometres (57 mi) from Olyokma, likely shot down by a missile. [97][98]
9 January 1968 Soviet UnionKaraganda Il-18V CCCP-75519 Northern W/O Unknown Landed short of the runway at Karaganda Airport. [99]
29 January 1968 Soviet UnionYakutsk An-12B CCCP-11015 Yakut W/O 0 Hard landing at Yakutsk Airport. [100]
19 February 1968 IraqBaghdad Unknown Unknown Unknown W/O 2/2 Hit a building on landing. [77][101]
29 February 1968 Soviet UnionOff Bratsk Il-18D CCCP-74252 Far East W/O 90/91 Broke up in-flight during an emergency descent, crashing and bursting into flames 160 kilometres (99 mi) away from Bratsk, possibly due to a fuel leak. The aircraft was en route a domestic scheduled Krasnoyarsk–Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky passenger service as Flight 15. One passenger, whose seat was attached to a large portion of the fuselage, survived the accident. [102]
7 March 1968 Soviet UnionVolgograd Tu-124 CCCP-45019 North Caucasus W/O 1/49 Crashed upon takeoff from Volgograd Airport due to pilot error. The aircraft was due to operate a Volgograd-Rostov on Don-Odessa passenger service as Flight 3153. [103][104]
9 March 1968 Soviet UnionMount Getantag Il-14 CCCP-41840 Georgia W/O 5/5 The aircraft was flying a Tbilisi–Yerevan cargo service when the flightcrew decided to fly back to Tbilisi as they had lost visual because of the weather. The aircraft crashed into Mount Getantag at 2,500 metres (8,200 ft). [105]
22 April 1968 Soviet UnionMoscow Il-18V CCCP-75526 Moscow W/O 5/5 Hit power lines while on a training flight and crashed near Domodedovo Airport. [106]
8 August 1968 Soviet UnionMirny, Russia[disambiguation needed] An-10 CCCP-11172 East Siberia W/O 0 Hit a vehicle after running off the runway following the failure of the main starboard undercarriage. [107]
6 October 1968 Soviet UnionMary An-24B CCCP-46552 Turkmenistan W/O Unknown Forced landing. [108]
20 October 1968 Soviet UnionKrasnoyarsk Il-18D CCCP-75436 West Siberia W/O 0 Crashed on an emergency landing in bad weather. [109]
2 November 1968 Soviet UnionLensk An-12B CCCP-11349 East Siberia W/O 6/6 Controlled flight into terrain on approach to Lensk Airport, 15.6 kilometres (9.7 mi) off Lensk. [110]
December 1968  Antarctica Li-2 CCCP-04214 Polar W/O 0 Damaged on landing; subsequently destroyed by strong winds. [111]
24 March 1969 Soviet UnionAlma-Ata An-24 CCCP-46751 Kazakhstan W/O 4/31 Crashed shortly after takeoff from Alma-Ata Airport. The right engine had lost power after the landing gear was retracted, causing a loss of speed and height, hitting trees and crashing into the ground. The airframe broke in two, and both pieces caught fire. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Alma-Ata–Karaganda passenger service as Flight 2305. [112]
28 April 1969 Soviet UnionIrkutsk Tu-104B CCCP-42436 East Siberia W/O Unknown Landed short of the runway at Irkutsk Airport. [113]
23 June 1969 Soviet UnionPoroslitsy Il-14M CCCP-52018 Ukraine W/O 24/24 The aircraft was en route a domestic scheduled Moscow–Chernigov passenger service as Flight 831. The captain unilaterally decided to increase height, colliding mid-air with a Soviet Air Force Antonov An-12 at 3,000 metres (9,800 ft), over the Poroslitsy village, Yukhnovsky District. The accident killed all 120 occupants aboard both aircraft. [114]
25 June 1969 Soviet UnionMirny An-12TB CCCP-11380 East Siberia W/O 0 Starboard main landing gear broke off upon landing at Mirny Airport. [115]
26 June 1969 Soviet UnionMagadan Il-14 CCCP-91527 Magadan W/O 3/5 A fire broke out shortly after takeoff from Magadan Airport. While attempting an emergency landing, the aircraft hit trees and crashed. Due to operate a Magadan–Seymchan cargo service. [116]
3 August 1969 Soviet UnionPreobrazhenka An-24B CCCP-46248 Ukraine W/O 55/55 The aircraft was en route a domestic scheduled DnepropetrovskVinnitsa passenger service as Flight H-826, when a blade from one of the port propellers separated from the engine. The detached blade punctured the fuselage and severed the controls. The airplane entered a spin and crashed near Preobrazhenka. [117]
12 August 1969 Soviet UnionNovosibirsk An-12B CCCP-11018 Polar W/O 4/6 The aircraft was completing the first leg of a Tiksi–Novosibirsk–Moscow cargo service as Flight 5134, when the engines lost power on approach to Novosibirsk Airport; it descended into a forest, 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) away from the airfield, and caught fire. [118]
19 August 1969 Unknown An-2R CCCP-96176 Belarus W/O Unknown Unknown [119]
26 August 1969 Soviet UnionMoscow Il-18B CCCP-75708 Moscow W/O 16/102 Inbound from Norilsk, the crew forgot to lower the landing gear. The aircraft belly landed at Vnukovo Airport, and a fire broke out. The aircraft was operating a Sochi-Norilsk-Moscow passenger service as Flight 1770. [77][120][121]
8 September 1969 Soviet UnionAmderma Il-18B CCCP-11377 Polar W/O 5/8 While the aircraft was taxiing at Amderma Airport for departing to Norilsk, it was impacted in the nose by a crashing Soviet Air Force Tupolev Tu-128 that veered off the runway following the collapse of its starboard main undercarriage upon landing. Both airplanes burst into flames. Seven people lost their lives in the accident, of whom two were aboard the military aircraft. [122]
10 September 1969 Soviet UnionYakutsk Il-18V CCCP-75791 Krasnoyarsk W/O 0 Collided with a vehicle after landing at Yakutsk Airport. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Krasnoyarsk-Yakutsk passenger service as Flight 93. [123]
12 October 1969 Soviet UnionMirny An-10 CCCP-11169 East Siberia W/O 0 Landed on icy runway at Mirny Airport. [124]
13 October 1969 Soviet UnionNizhnevartovsk An-24B CCCP-47772 Tyumen W/O 24/56 Crashed some 1 kilometre (0.62 mi) short of the runway, on approach to Nizhnevartovsk Airport, after a feathering of the propellers due to an accidental activation of the de-icing system. The aircraft was completing a domestic scheduled Surgut-Nizhnevartovsk passenger service as Flight 227. [125]
13 November 1969 Soviet UnionAmderma An-12TB CCCP-11376 Polar W/O 9/9 Crashed on approach to Amderma Airport, 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) away from the airfield, due to icing conditions. [126]
6 December 1969 Soviet UnionKhatanga An-12PL CCCP-11381 Polar W/O 8/8 The aircraft was completing a Syktyvkar–Khatanga cargo service when it crashed 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) off Khatanga Airport, on approach, due to icing. [127]
11 December 1969 Unknown Il-18B CCCP-75669 Moscow W/O 0 Damaged beyond repair due to the stresses the airframe underwent when it flew in heavy turbulence. [128]
11 December 1969 Unknown Il-18B CCCP-75699 Moscow W/O Unknown Unknown [129]

See also[edit]


Footnotes[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Dubious location

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-75538 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 1 March 2012.
  2. ^ "Accident record for the Ilyushin Il-18". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 7 March 2012. 
  3. ^ "Accident record for the Tupolev Tu-114". Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved 7 March 2012. 
  4. ^ "The World's Airlines—Aeroflot – Grazdanskij Wozdusnyj Flot". Flight International 81 (2770): 550. 12 April 1962. Archived from the original on 9 August 2013. 
  5. ^ "Aeroflot flies blind". Flight International 110 (3535): 1691. 11 December 1976. Archived from the original on 9 August 2013. 
  6. ^ Accident description for CCCP-98332 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 February 2012.
  7. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11180 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 February 2012.
  8. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75648 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 19 January 2014.
  9. ^ Accident description for CCCP-61696 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 February 2012.
  10. ^ "Катастрофа Ил-14 Сыктывкарской отд авиагруппы ГВФ близ Сыктывкара" [Accident Il-14 near Syktyvkar] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  11. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75705 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 February 2012.
  12. ^ "Катастрофа Ил-18Б 235 аоон ГВФ в районе Киева" [Accident Il-18B in the Kiev area] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  13. ^ Hijacking description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 February 2012.
  14. ^ Accident description for CCCP-04200 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 February 2012.
  15. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42452 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 February 2012.
  16. ^ Accident description for CCCP-52091 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 February 2012.
  17. ^ "Катастрофа Ил-14М Сыктывкарской отд авиагруппы ГВФ в Горьковской области" [Accident Il-14 Chernovo] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 10 August 2012. 
  18. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75651 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 February 2012.
  19. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42357 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 February 2012.
  20. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42438 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 19 January 2014.
  21. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75672 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 February 2012.
  22. ^ Accident description for CCCP-41848 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2012.
  23. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42447 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 19 January 2014.
  24. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75766 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 February 2012.
  25. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75653 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 February 2012.
  26. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42388 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2012.
  27. ^ Accident description for CCCP-16154 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 19 January 2014.
  28. ^ Accident description for CCCP-61712 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 February 2012.
  29. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42504 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 February 2012.
  30. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75654 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 February 2012.
  31. ^ Accident description for CCCP-84603 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 February 2012.
  32. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75757 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2012.
  33. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11148 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 February 2012.
  34. ^ Accident description for CCCP-23700 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2012.
  35. ^ Accident description for CCCP-49262 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2012.
  36. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42491 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 February 2012.
  37. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42370 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 February 2012.
  38. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-104А Дальневосточного управления ГВФ близ Красноярска" [Tu-104 accident near Krasnoyarsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  39. ^ Accident description for CCCP-91554 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 February 2012.
  40. ^ "Air commerce – Il-14 Accident". Flight International 82 (2784): 88. 19 July 1962. Archived from the original on 9 August 2013. "About 14 people were killed and others, including an American student, injured when an Aeroflot Il-14 crashed on a flight to Tashkent from Samarkand on July 6." 
  41. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11186 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 February 2012.
  42. ^ Incident description for CCCP-76479 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 February 2012.
  43. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42366 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 August 2012.
  44. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42495 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 February 2012.
  45. ^ "Tu-104 Crash" (PDF). Flight International: 701. 1 November 1962. Retrieved 24 February 2012. "An Aeroflot Tu-104 crashed on take-off from Moscow Sheremetyevo on October 25. The aircraft was on a test flight; there are reports of from 10 to 20 fatalities." 
  46. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75843 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 February 2012.
  47. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11193 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 February 2012.
  48. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75732 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 2 November 2012.
  49. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75765 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 February 2012.
  50. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11338 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 February 2012.
  51. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75866 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 February 2012.
  52. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42483 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 February 2012.
  53. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42492 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 February 2012.
  54. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-104Б Восточно-Сибирского управления ГВФ в районе Иркутска" [Tu-104B accident Irkutsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 10 August 2012. 
  55. ^ Accident description for CCCP-45021 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 February 2012.
  56. ^ Accident description for CCCP-61617 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 February 2012.
  57. ^ Accident description for CCCP-04197 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 February 2012.
  58. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75686 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 February 2012.
  59. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11347 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 October 2012.
  60. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-42476 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 February 2012.
  61. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75661 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 February 2012.
  62. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75824 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 February 2012.
  63. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75531 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 February 2012.
  64. ^ Accident description for CCCP-41883 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 February 2012.
  65. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75685 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2012.
  66. ^ Accident description for CCCP-45028 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 February 2012.
  67. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46764 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 February 2012.
  68. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11337 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2012.
  69. ^ Accident description for CCCP-45086 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 May 2014.
  70. ^ Accident description for CCCP-01189 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 February 2012.
  71. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75688 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 February 2012.
  72. ^ Hijacking description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 February 2012.
  73. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 October 2012.
  74. ^ Accident description for CCCP-52058 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 February 2012.
  75. ^ "Катастрофа Ил-14 Сыктывкарской ОАГ ГА близ Печоры" [Accident Il-14M near Pechora] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  76. ^ Accident description for CCCP-76491 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 29 February 2012.
  77. ^ a b c "Aeroflot known accident record 1966-76" (PDF). Flight International: 1695. 11 December 1976. Retrieved 6 March 2012. 
  78. ^ "The Tu-114 Accident" (PDF). Flight International: 337. 3 March 1966. Retrieved 18 September 2011. "The total number killed in the takeoff accident to a Tu-114 at Sheremetievo Airport, Moscow, has now been reported as 21—six passengers, two airline officials, two hostesses and 11 aircrew members. The passengers included Mr Alexander Petrov, Russia's Deputy Chief of the Committee for Cultural Relations with Foreign Countries." 
  79. ^ "TU-114 ACCIDENT" (PDF). Flight International: 296. 24 February 1966. Retrieved 18 September 2011. "An Aeroflot Tu-114 crashed early in the morning of February 17 at Sheremetievo Airport, Moscow, during take-off on a proving flight in preparation for regular services to Brazzaville, Congo Republic, via Conakry and Accra." 
  80. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-114 ТУ МВЛ ГА в а/п Шереметьево" [Tu-114 accident near Sheremetyevo] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  81. ^ Accident description for CCCP-61772 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 29 February 2012.
  82. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75552 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2012.
  83. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75665 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 June 2013.
  84. ^ Accident description for CCCP-04343 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 29 February 2012.
  85. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-12 Полярного управления ГА близ Новосибирска" [An-12 accident Novosibirsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  86. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11007 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 29 February 2012.
  87. ^ Accident description for CCCP-61657 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 29 February 2012.
  88. ^ "Катастрофа Ил-14 Якутского УГА близ Покровска" [Accident Il-14 Yakutsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 6 November 2012. 
  89. ^ Accident description for CCCP-04366 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 29 February 2012.
  90. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42615 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 1 March 2012.
  91. ^ Accident description for CCCP-16150 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 1 March 2012.
  92. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 1 March 2012.[dead link]
  93. ^ "Il-18 Strikes Mountain" (pdf). Flight International: 899. 30 November 1967. Retrieved 6 September 2011. "A Russian Government commission has been set up to investigate the causes of the crash of an Aeroflot Il-18 on November 16 near Sverdlovsk in the Urals. Reports say that the aircraft hit high ground in bad weather soon after take-off, that all 130 passengers and crew were killed and that Il-18s were grounded after the crash." 
  94. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46215 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 1 March 2012.
  95. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-24Б Латвийского УГА в Лиепае" [Accident An-24B Liepaya] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 10 June 2014. 
  96. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46201 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 1 March 2012.
  97. ^ Accident description for CCCP-47733 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 March 2012.
  98. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-24Б Якутского УГА близ Олёкминска" [Accident An-24B near Olekminsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 6 August 2012. 
  99. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75519 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 March 2012.
  100. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11015 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 March 2012.
  101. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 March 2012.
  102. ^ Accident description for CCCP-74252 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 March 2012.
  103. ^ Accident description for CCCP-45019 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 March 2012.
  104. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-124 Северо-Кавказского УГА в а/п Волгоград (Гурмак)" [Accident Tu-124 Volgograd] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 27 May 2014. 
  105. ^ Accident description for CCCP-41840 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 March 2012.
  106. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75526 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 March 2012.
  107. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11172 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 March 2012.
  108. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46552 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 March 2012.
  109. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75436 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2012.
  110. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11349 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 March 2012.
  111. ^ Accident description for CCCP-04214 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 March 2012.
  112. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46751 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 March 2012.
  113. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42436 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 March 2012.
  114. ^ Accident description for CCCP-52018 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 March 2012.
  115. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11380 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 March 2012.
  116. ^ Accident description for CCCP-91527 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 March 2012.
  117. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46248 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 March 2012.
  118. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11018 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 March 2012.
  119. ^ Accident description for CCCP-96176 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2012.
  120. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75708 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 March 2012.
  121. ^ "Катастрофа Ил-18В Московского ТУ ГА в а/п Внуково" [Accident Il-18 Vnukovo] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 10 June 2014. 
  122. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11377 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 March 2012.
  123. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75791 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2012.
  124. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11169 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2012.
  125. ^ Accident description for CCCP-47772 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 March 2012.
  126. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11376 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 March 2012.
  127. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11381 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 March 2012.
  128. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75669 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 March 2012.
  129. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75699 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 March 2012.