Aeroflot accidents and incidents in the 1970s

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Aeroflot accidents and incidents in the 1970s
Aeroflot Tu-134A CCCP-65862 ZRH 1983-1-9.png
A Tupolev Tu-134, similar to both aircraft involved in the August 1979 (1979-08) mid-air collision, is seen here on final approach to Zurich Airport in 1983.

Aeroflot, the Soviet Union's national carrier, experienced a number of serious accidents and incidents during the 1970s. The airline's worst accident during the decade took place in August 1979 (1979-08), when two Tupolev Tu-134s were involved in a mid-air collision over the Ukrainian city of Dniprodzerzhinsk, with the loss of 178 lives. Including this event, there were nine deadly incidents with more than 100 fatalities, while the total recorded number of casualties was 3,545 for the decade.

Almost all of the events shown below occurred within the Soviet Union. The company was reluctant to publicise deadly accidents at the time and tended to admit only those that took place beyond the borders of the Soviet Union or ones in which foreigners were included in the list of fatalities.[1][2] The airline's policy of suppressing of information on accidents during this period means that casualty figures are likely to be higher than shown in the published record, as the fate of the occupants aboard many aircraft that were written off was not publicly disclosed.

The Antonov An-10, which entered the fleet in 1957,[3] was withdrawn from service following an accident that occurred in May 1972 (1972-05) and killed all 122 people on board. In the decade, the company lost five aircraft of the type. Other types lost in accidents/incidents were 41 Antonov An-2s, 16 Antonov An-12s, two Antonov An-22s, 30 Antonov An-24s, two Antonov An-26s, two Avia 14s, 14 Ilyushin Il-14s, 17 Ilyushin Il-18s, two Ilyushin Il-62s, two Let L-410s, six Lisunov Li-2s, 16 Tupolev Tu-104s, eight Tupolev Tu-124s, six Tupolev Tu-134s, seven Tupolev Tu-154s, and 25 Yakovlev Yak-40s.

List[edit]

Date Location Aircraft Tail number Airline division Aircraft damage Fatalities Description Refs
1970 Soviet UnionSaratov An-24B CCCP-46241 Privolzhsk W/O Unknown Destroyed by fire while refuelling at Saratov Airport. [4]
1970 Unknown An-2R CCCP-15238 Uzbekistan W/O Unknown Crashed under unspecified circumstances. [5]
28 January 1970 Soviet UnionOff Batagay An-24B CCCP-47701 Yakut W/O 34/34 Crashed 40 kilometres (25 mi) away from Batagay on a premature descent to the city airport, inbound from Deputatskiy Airport on a domestic scheduled passenger service. [6]
29 January 1970 Soviet UnionMurmansk Tu-124V CCCP-45083 Northern W/O 11/38 Crashed into a snow-covered hill, 29 kilometres (18 mi) away from Murmansk Airport, on approach, sliding down the snowy slope. Five occupants of the airplane perished immediately after impact; another six occupants died from hypothermia while awaiting for the rescue teams. The airplane was operating a domestic scheduled Leningrad–Murmansk passenger service as Flight 145. [7]
31 January 1970 Soviet UnionMagnitogorsk An-2TP CCCP-40573 Ural W/O Unknown Crashed under unspecified circumstances. [8]
6 February 1970 Soviet UnionSamarkand Il-18V CCCP-75798 Uzbekistan W/O 92/106 Crashed into a mountain amid a cloudy scenario, 32 kilometres (20 mi) northeast of Samarkand, while on approach to Samarkand Airport, inbound from Tashkent. [9]
25 February 1970 Soviet UnionUst-Maya Il-14 CCCP-61637 Yakut W/O 5/5 Crashed shortly after takeoff from Ust-Maya Airport following a malfunction on one of its engines during initial climbout. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Ust-Maya–Yakutsk passenger service. [10]
26 February 1970 Soviet UnionBeryozovo An-12TB CCCP-12966 North Caucasus W/O 0 Hard landing at Beryozovo Airport. [11]
5 March 1970 Soviet UnionUst-Kut Li-2 CCCP-58340 Unknown W/O Unknown Veered off the runway on takeoff from Ust-Kut Airport. [12]
19 March 1970 Soviet UnionTaganrog An-2R CCCP-25598 Uzbekistan W/O Unknown Controlled flight into terrain. The aircraft was performing an unauthorised crop spraying mission. [13]
1 April 1970 Soviet UnionToguchina An-24B CCCP-47751 West Siberia W/O 45/45 The aircraft crashed 20 kilometres (12 mi) southeast of Toguchina, after it collided with a weather balloon while en route a domestic scheduled Novosibirsk–Krasnoyarsk passenger service as Flight 1661. [14]
4 April 1970 Soviet UnionZaporozhye Il-14 CCCP-52002 Georgia W/O 7/35 Crashed on approach to Zaporozhye Airport. The crew initiated the approach prematurely and did not monitor altitude. The pilots were late in configurating the plane for landing, and came in too low. A go-around was initiated at 40 metres (130 ft). While making a right-hand turn, the wing contacted the ground, causing the plane to crash 2,500 metres (8,200 ft) from the runway and 600 metres (2,000 ft) to the left of the runway centerline. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Rostov-Zaporozhye service as Flight 2903. [15]
20 April 1970 Soviet UnionPsebai An-2R CCCP-06333 North Caucasus W/O 14/14 Crashed on approach to Psebai Airport, inbound from Krasnodar, amid foggy conditions. [16]
28 April 1970 Soviet UnionRyazan An-2R CCCP-15935 Unknown W/O Unknown Crashed under unspecified circumstances. [17]
15 May 1970 Soviet UnionKishinev An-10A CCCP-11149 Ulyanovsk Flight School of Civil Aviation W/O 11/11 On a training flight, lost control after a go-around at Kishinev Airport with two shut-down engines. [18]
5 June 1970 Soviet UnionSamarkand Il-18V CCCP-75533 Uzbekistan W/O Unknown The locking of the rudder on take-off led to the crash of the aircraft at Samarkand Airport. [19]
18 July 1970 Unknown An-22 CCCP-09303 Unknown W/O 23/23 Missing in the North Atlantic while flying a ReykjavíkSydney cargo service operated for the Soviet Air Force. [20][21]
8 August 1970 Soviet UnionKishinev An-10A CCCP-11188 Ukraine W/O 1/114 Force landed 38 kilometres (24 mi) from Kishinev. Twelve minutes into the flight, at 5,400 metres (17,700 ft), the crew detected smoke in the cockpit with a burning smell. An in-flight fire erupted after the number four engine suffered an uncontained failure, forcing the crew to carry out an emergency descent. The fire was extinguished, but hydraulic pressure was lost later. The pilot carried out a forced landing in a corn field. The terrain was uneven, and the fuselage collapsed. One passenger died. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Vinnitsa-Simferopol service as Flight 888. [22]
2 September 1970 Soviet UnionDnepropetrovsk Tu-124 CCCP-45012 Lithuania W/O 37/37 Crashed after control of the aircraft was lost en route a domestic scheduled Rostov-on-DonVilnius passenger service, operated as Flight 3630. [23]
3 September 1970 Soviet UnionLeninabad Yak-40 CCCP-87690 Tajikistan W/O 21/21 Flew into the side of a mountain at 2,100 m (6,900 ft). The crew began descending over mountainous terrain in IMC conditions while they were not aware of the aircraft's exact position. [24]
21 September 1970 Unknown An-2P CCCP-02195 Unknown W/O Unknown Crashed under unspecified circumstances. [25]
1 October 1970 Soviet UnionKamenny Mys An-12B CCCP-11031 International W/O 8/8 Crashed upon take-off following engine failures due to malfunctions in the fuel pump system. [26]
15 October 1970 TurkeyTrabzon An-24B CCCP-46256 Georgia Unknown 1/60 The aircraft was hijacked while en route from Batumi to Sukhumi by two hijackers, who demanded to be flown to Turkey. [27]
16 October 1970 Soviet UnionSimferopol Il-18V CCCP-75578 Armenia W/O Unknown Crashed on landing due to hydraulic problems. [28]
16 October 1970 Soviet UnionLeshukonskoye Li-2 CCCP-84777 Northern W/O 0 Crashed on takeoff from Leshukonskoye Airport. The aircraft was overloaded, having its center of gravity beyond the aft limit. [29]
19 December 1970 IndiaPanagarh An-22 CCCP-09303 Unknown W/O 17/17 Struck the ground, crashed, and burst into flames at Panagarh Airport on a belly-landing attempt. The aircraft had departed Tejgaon Airport on a cargo service operated for the Soviet Air Force. [21][30]
31 December 1970 Soviet UnionLeningrad Il-18V CCCP-75773 Armenia W/O 6/86[nb 1] Crashed upon take-off from Pulkovo Airport when the crew forgot to select the flaps a priori. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Leningrad–Yerevan passenger service as Flight 3012. [31]
22 January 1971 Soviet UnionSurgut An-12B CCCP-11000 Komi W/O 13/13 The aircraft was operating a cargo service from Omsk to Surgut when it crashed 15 kilometres (9.3 mi) short of the runway due to icing conditions. [32]
31 January 1971 Soviet UnionSurgut An-12B CCCP-12996 Tyumen W/O 7/7 Icing conditions on the ailerons led the aircraft to undershoot the runway on landing at Surgut Airport and crash. [33]
7 February 1971 Soviet UnionKirovsk Il-14 CCCP-91535 Arkhangelsk W/O Unknown Undershot the runway on landing at Kirovsk Airport. [34]
16 February 1971 Soviet UnionVorkuta An-12TB CCCP-11374 Komi W/O 0/5 The aircraft was operating a Norilsk–Vorkuta flight. It was due to land at Vorkuta Airport, but diverted to an alternative airfield because of the weather. Overran the runway on landing, hit a snow mound, and broke up. [35]
31 March 1971 Soviet UnionVoroshilovgrad An-10 CCCP-11145 Privolzhsk W/O 65/65 Crashed 13 kilometres (8.1 mi) away from Voroshilovgrad Airport on approach, due to structural failure of the starboard outer wing. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Kuybyshev–Voroshilovgrad passenger service as Flight 1969. [36][37]
31 March 1971 Soviet UnionMoscow An-24 CCCP-46747 Moscow W/O Unknown Crashed under unspecified circumstances while on a training flight. [38]
25 May 1971 Soviet UnionBatagay An-12B CCCP-11024 Yakut W/O Unknown Hard landing at Batagay Airport. [39]
1 June 1971 Soviet UnionBogodorsk Island An-24B CCCP-47729 East Siberia W/O 0 Crashed near Ulan-Ude while on a training flight. Part of the training was to fly the aircraft with one engine out. After the engine was shut down and its propeller feathered, the flight engineer shut down the remaining engine by mistake and a forced landing was carried out. [40]
25 July 1971[nb 2] Soviet UnionIrkutsk Tu-104B CCCP-42405 West Siberia W/O 97/126 Hard-landed and burst into flames at Irkutsk Airport, inbound from Novosibirsk. [21][41]
28 July 1971 Soviet UnionMoscow Yak-40 CCCP-87719 Moscow W/O 0 Overran the runway on landing at Bykovo Airport. [42]
29 July 1971 IndiaCalcutta An-12B CCCP-12993 International W/O 0/7 Overshot the runway on landing in heavy rain at Dum Dum Airport. [43]
10 October 1971 Soviet UnionMoscow Tu-104B CCCP-42490 Ukraine W/O 25/25 Detonation of an explosive device shortly after takeoff from Vnukovo Airport. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Moscow–Simferopol passenger service as Flight 773. [44]
11 October 1971 Soviet UnionTyubelyaha An-2 CCCP-47678 Yakut W/O 6/7 Crashed into a mountain in poor weather while en route a Moma AirportUst-Nera passenger service. The wreckage was found five days later. [45]
12 October 1971 Soviet UnionKishinev An-10A CCCP-11137 Moldova W/O Unknown Damaged on landing at Kishinev Airport. [46]
12 November 1971 Soviet UnionVinnytsia An-24B CCCP-46809 Ukraine W/O 52/52 Crashed during a go-around at Vinnytsia Airport, inbound from Kiev. [47]
13 November 1971 Soviet UnionKerch An-24B CCCP-46378 Ukraine W/O 6/11 Struck power lines on approach to Kerch Airport. [48]
1 December 1971 Soviet UnionSaratov An-24B CCCP-46788 Privolzhsk W/O 57/57 Lost height and crashed on final approach to Saratov Airport. [49]
30 December 1971 Soviet UnionBaranikha Il-14M CCCP-91570 Magadan W/O Unknown Overran the runway. [50]
1972 Unknown An-2TP CCCP-41295 Komi W/O Unknown Crashed under unspecified circumstances. [51]
22 February 1972 Soviet UnionLipetsk An-24 CCCP-46732 Moscow W/O 0 Crashed after the pilot accidentally activated the thrust reversers while the aircraft was on approach to Lipetsk Airport. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Moscow-Lipetsk service as Flight 25. [52]
27 February 1972 Soviet UnionMineralnye Vody An-24B CCCP-46418 North Caucasus W/O 0 Lost control and crashed on approach to Mineralnye Vody Airport, after an unintentional application of the thrust reversers. [53]
19 March 1972 Soviet UnionOmsk Tu-104B CCCP-42408 East Siberia W/O 0 Struck a snow wall on landing at Omsk Airport following several landing attempts. [54]
11 April 1972 Soviet UnionYukagir Village An-2T CCCP-44937 Yakut W/O 1/3 Lost control and crashed on a flapless take-off at the Yukagir Village, Ust-Yansky District. [55]
4 May 1972 Soviet UnionBratsk Yak-40 CCCP-87778 East Siberia W/O 18/18 Crashed into trees and burnt up when it was pushed down by a downdraft on approach to Bratsk Airport, inbound from Irkutsk as Flight 608. [56]
18 May 1972 Soviet UnionKharkov An-10A CCCP-11215 Ukraine W/O 122/122[nb 3] Operating a domestic scheduled passenger service as Flight 1491, crashed 24 kilometres (15 mi) off Kharkiv on approach to the city airport, inbound from Moscow, when both wings separated from the fuselage. Aeroflot retired its An-10 fleet from service following this event. [57][58][59]
4 August 1972 Soviet UnionAldan Il-14M CCCP-91537 Yakut W/O 0 Destroyed by fire in a forced landing attempt due to an engine failure, shortly after take-off from Aldan Airport. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Aldan–Chulman passenger service. [60]
26 August 1972 Soviet UnionArkhangelsk Il-18B CCCP-75663 Northern W/O Unknown Crashed upon landing in fog at Talagi Airport. [61]
31 August 1972 Soviet UnionSmelovskiy Il-18V CCCP-74298 Kazakhstan W/O 101/101 A fire broke out in the cargo hold, at 7,200 metres (23,600 ft), while the aircraft was covering a domestic scheduled Alma-Ata–Moscow passenger service as Flight 558. The crew attempted to make an emergency landing at Magnitogorsk. During the descent, the airplane entered a spinning dive from an altitude of 2,400 metres (7,900 ft), and crashed near Smelovskiy. [62][63]
1 October 1972[nb 4] Soviet UnionAdler Il-18V CCCP-75507 Moscow W/O 108/108 Crashed into the Black Sea shortly after takeoff from Sochi Airport, 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) off the shore. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Adler–Moscow passenger service as Flight 1036. [57][64][65]
13 October 1972 Soviet UnionMoscow Il-62 CCCP-86671 International W/O 174/174[nb 5] Crashed into a lake after several landing attempts into Sheremetyevo Airport, approximately 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) east of the airport. The aircraft was operating a domestic non-scheduled Paris–Leningrad–Moscow passenger service as Flight 217. [66][67][68]
4 November 1972 Soviet UnionKursk An-24B CCCP-46202 Privolzhsk W/O 0 Crashed after it contacted trees on approach to Vostochny Airport. [69]
21 November 1972 Soviet UnionVorkuta An-12TB CCCP-11360 Privolzhsk W/O Unknown Landed short of the runway at Vorkuta Airport, ending up in a ravine. [70]
22 November 1972 Soviet UnionKrasnoyarsk Yak-40 CCCP-87819 Krasnoyarsk W/O 0 Crashed on takeoff from Krasnoyarsk Airport due to icing conditions. [71]
22 January 1973 Soviet UnionPetukhovo An-24B CCCP-46276 North Caucasus W/O 39/39 Crashed into the snow near Petukhovo, apparently after it was hit by a surface-to-air missile while en route to Perm Airport. There were 39 people on board. Despite a few of them surviving the accident, they later died because of the low temperatures, before the rescue team reached the crash site. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Kazan-Perm passenger service as Flight 6263. [72]
17 February 1973 Soviet UnionAmderma An-12BP CCCP-11341 Polar W/O 0 Hard landing at Amderma Airport. [73]
19 February 1973 CzechoslovakiaPrague Tu-154 CCCP-85023 International W/O 66/100 Crashed on approach to Ruzyne Airport. While completing an international scheduled Moscow-Prague passenger service as Flight 141 the aircraft suddenly lost height and struck the ground. [74]
24 February 1973 Soviet UnionOff Ura-Tyube Il-18V CCCP-75712 Tajikistan W/O 79/79 Broke up at a height of 2,200 metres (7,200 ft) as it spun, crashing 40 kilometres (25 mi) away from Ura-Tyube. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Dushanbe–Leninabad passenger service as Flight 630. [75][76]
28 February 1973 Soviet UnionSemipalatinsk Yak-40 CCCP-87602 Kazakhstan W/O 32/32 Seconds after getting airborne, the airplane fell back to the runway at Semipalatinsk Airport. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Semipalatinsk–Ust-Kamenogorsk passenger service as Flight X-167. [77][78]
March 1973 Soviet UnionKiev Tu-154 Unknown Unknown W/O Unknown Crashed under unspecified circumstances. [79]
24 April 1973 Soviet UnionLeningrad Tu-104B CCCP-42505 Northern W/O 2 The aircraft was en route from Leningrad-Shosseynaya Airport to Moscow when it was hijacked. Despite an explosive device exploding inflight, killing the flight engineer and the hijacker and also damaging the right side of the airframe, it landed safely at the airport of departure. [80]
30 April 1973 North Pole Li-2T CCCP-04244 Yakut W/O 0/7 Fell through the ice while taxiing for takeoff. The aircraft was deliberately destroyed for security reasons, as it was carrying secret communication equipment. [81]
7 May 1973 Soviet UnionMoscow Tu-154 CCCP-85030 Moscow W/O 0 Spoiler activation upon take-off from Vnukovo Airport led to the crash of the aircraft. [82]
11 May 1973 Soviet UnionOff Semipalatinsk Il-18B CCCP-75687 Azerbaijan W/O 63/63 The aircraft was en route a domestic scheduled Tashkent–Novosibirsk passenger service as Flight 6551, when it crashed 84 kilometres (52 mi) south of Semipalatinsk, after it broke up at 5,000 metres (16,000 ft), possibly due to a steep emergency descent. [83]
18 May 1973 Soviet UnionOff Chita Tu-104B CCCP-42411[nb 6] East Siberia W/O 82/82 Was hijacked en route a domestic scheduled Irkutsk–Chita passenger service as Flight 109 by a passenger who demanded to be flown to China. The explosive device this passenger held detonated, and the aircraft crashed east of Lake Baikal, 97 kilometres (60 mi) west of Chita. [84][85]
30 June 1973 JordanAmman Tu-134A CCCP-65668 Armenia W/O 9/85 Crashed into a house and broke in three after it failed to get airborne at Marka International Airport. The aircraft was due to operate a scheduled Amman–Beirut international passenger service as Flight 512. Two occupants of the aircraft lost their lives, as well as seven people on the ground. [86][87]
4 July 1973 Soviet UnionOff Shakhtyorsk Il-14 CCCP-91534 Far East W/O 18/18 Flew into the side of a mountain 53 kilometres (33 mi) away from Shakhtyorsk when it made a premature descent. [88]
9 July 1973 Soviet UnionKuybyshev Tu-124V CCCP-45062 Privolzhsk Repaired 2/61 Forced landing at Kuybyshev Airport following an engine failure. The aircraft was operating a Kuybyshev-Simferopol passenger service as Flight 5385. [89][90]
8 August 1973 Soviet UnionArkhangelsk Yak-40 CCCP-87790 Northern W/O 1 The locking of the elevator on take-off led to the crash of the aircraft at Arkhangelsk Airport. [91]
18 August 1973 Soviet UnionOff Baku An-24B CCCP-46435 Azerbaijan W/O 56/64 The airplane experienced an engine failure shortly after takeoff from Baku Airport. While returning to the airport the aircraft hit a drilling rig at Neftyanyye Kamni, crashing 45 kilometres (28 mi) east of Baku. [92]
30 September 1973 Soviet UnionSverdlovsk Tu-104B CCCP-42506 Uzbekistan W/O 108/108 Loss of control following take-off from Koltsovo Airport. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Sverdlovsk–Khabarovsk passenger service as Flight 3932. [93]
2 October 1973 Soviet UnionMagadan An-12TB CCCP-12967 Yakut W/O 10/10 Deviated some 6 kilometres (3.7 mi) from the extended centerline on approach to Magadan Airport and crashed into a hillside. The aircraft was operating a Yakutsk-Magadan cargo service as Flight 10178F. [94][95]
10 October 1973 Soviet UnionTashauz Li-2 CCCP-71209 Turkmenistan W/O 5/5 Crashed soon after departing from Tashauz Airport, following a double engine failure. Due to fly a Tashauz–Darvaza cargo service. [96]
13 October 1973 Soviet UnionMoscow Tu-104B CCCP-42486 Georgia W/O 122/122 The aircraft was about to complete a domestic scheduled Tbilisi–Moscow passenger service as Flight 964 when it crashed on approach to Domodedovo Airport following an electrical power failure. This crash is the worst ever accident involving the Tu-104. [97][98]
2 November 1973 Soviet UnionMoscow Yak-40 Unknown Unknown Unknown 2 While operating a Briansk–Moscow flight, the airplane was hijacked en route by 4 hijackers that demanded money and to be flown to Sweden. Stormed by security forces at an unknown airport in Moscow. [99]
20 November 1973 Soviet UnionKazan Tu-124V CCCP-45031 Moscow W/O 0 Overran the runway on landing at Kazan Airport. [100]
7 December 1973 Soviet UnionMoscow Tu-104B CCCP-42503 Georgia W/O 16/75 Inbound from Kutaisi at above-normal speed, the aircraft crashed when one wing touched the ground as the crew tried to slow it down for landing at Domodedovo Airport. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Kutaisi-Moscow passenger service as Flight 964. [101][102]
16 December 1973 Soviet UnionKaracharovo Tu-124V CCCP-45061 Lithuania W/O 51/51 On approach to Vnukovo Airport inbound from Vilnius, control was lost at 8,000 metres (26,000 ft) due to a short circuit in the elevator trim system. The aircraft was operating a domestic passenger service as Flight 2022. [103][104]
21 December 1973 Soviet UnionYerevan Yak-40 CCCP-87629 Armenia W/O 0 Hard landing in fog at Erebuni Airport. [105]
23 December 1973 Soviet UnionVynnyky Tu-124V CCCP-45044 Moscow W/O 17/17 Strong vibrations created by a defective turbine blade in one engine caused the rupture of the fuel line, starting a in-flight fire in the airframe, that was due to operate a domestic scheduled Lvov–Kiev passenger service as Flight 5398. The aircraft crashed near Vynnyky shortly after takeoff from Sknyliv Airport. [106][107]
1974  Antarctica Li-2 CCCP-04342 Unknown W/O Unknown Crashed. [108]
6 January 1974 Soviet UnionMukachevo An-24B CCCP-46357 Ukraine W/O 24/24 Was operating a domestic scheduled Ivano-FrankovskUzhgorod passenger service as Flight H-75 when it attempted to land at the Mukachevo Air Base as the airport of destination was temporarily closed. On approach, the aircraft flew through clouds in icing conditions, yet the de-icing system was switched off; it lost longitudinal stability and crashed. [109][110]
25 January 1974 Soviet UnionRostov-on-Don An-24B CCCP-46277 Privolzhsk W/O 4/4 Crashed after takeoff from Rostov Airport. [111]
22 March 1974 Soviet UnionKirov Li-2 CCCP-73960 Ural W/O 3/9 Crashed shortly after take-off from Kirov Airport due to an engine failure. [112]
6 April 1974 Soviet UnionUst-Kuyga Avia 14P CCCP-52053 Yakut W/O 0/18 Unintentional retraction of the landing gear. [113]
9 April 1974 Soviet UnionKazan Yak-40 CCCP-87369 Privolzhsk W/O Unknown Crashed at Kazan Airport after an engire fire. [114]
24 April 1974[nb 7] Soviet UnionTashkent Il-18E CCCP-75405 Uzbekistan W/O 1/115 The aircraft suffered a bird strike shortly after take-off from Tashkent-Yuzhny Airport and crashed. [115]
27 April 1974 Soviet UnionLeningrad Il-18V CCCP-75559 Leningrad W/O 118/118 Crashed shortly after takeoff from Pulkovo Airport, during initial climbout, following a failure of the outer starboard engine. An asymmetric retraction of the flaps, amid a strong vibration of the airframe, led to the loss of control of the aircraft, which was due to operate a domestic scheduled Leningrad–Krasnodar passenger service. [116][117]
1 May 1974 Soviet UnionNorth Pole-22 An-12B CCCP-12950 Krasnoyarsk W/O 1/16 Hit an ice pinnacle during an emergency take-off, crashing and catching fire. [118]
2 May 1974 Soviet UnionRostov-on-Don Yak-40 CCCP-87398 Central W/O 1/38 Crashed following an aborted take-off at Rostov Airport. The aircraft was operating a Lipetsk-Rostov on Don-Mineralnye Vody passenger service as Flight 1255. [119][120]
9 May 1974 Soviet UnionIvano-Frankovsk Il-18V CCCP-75425 Ural W/O 0 The aircraft overran the 500-metre (1,600 ft) long airstrip it was mistakenly landed on at Ivano-Frankovsk Airport, ending up in a ravine and breaking in two. [121]
23 May 1974 Soviet UnionKiev Yak-40 CCCP-87579 Ukraine W/O 29/29 Crashed on approach to Zhulyany Airport. Suspected flightcrew intoxication with carbon monoxide. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Riga-Kiev passenger service as Flight H-166. [122][123]
27 July 1974 Soviet UnionSasovo An-2TP CCCP-35029 Sasovo Flight School W/O 3/3 A fully upward deflection of the elevator trim tab caused the airplane to lose control and crash. [124]
28 August 1974 Soviet UnionAndryushkino An-2V CCCP-04302 Yakut Unknown 0 Damaged struts collapsed on landing, causing the left lower wing to tear off. [125]
18 October 1974 Soviet UnionYeniseysk An-12B CCCP-11030 East Siberia W/O 1 The aircraft hit trees on approach to Yeniseysk Airport when the airplane descended below the glidepath, crashing some 1,900 metres (6,200 ft) short of the runway. [126]
1 November 1974 Soviet UnionSurgut An-2 CCCP-70766 Tyumen W/O 6/6 Mid-air collision with a Mi-8T. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Khanty-Mansiysk–Surgut passenger service, while the helicopter had left Surgut bound for Nefteyugansk. It is assumed that 26 people aboard the helicopter also perished in the accident. [127]
5 November 1974 Soviet UnionChita Tu-104B CCCP-42501 Far East W/O 0 Overran the runway on landing at Chita Airport, crashing into a railway embankment. [128]
14 November 1974 Soviet UnionKiev Il-14M CCCP-91515 Ukraine W/O 6/6 Lost control and crashed on fire shortly after take-off from Zhulyany Airport. [129]
4 December 1974 Soviet UnionIrkutsk An-12B CCCP-12985 East Siberia W/O 0 Both aircraft collided in the air when the An-2R, just departed Irkutsk Airport, crossed the path of the An-12B that was on a training flight. The accident was caused by air traffic controllers error, who cleared the An-2R for take-off. [130]

[131]

An-2R CCCP-49342 East Siberia W/O 13/13
14 December 1974 Soviet UnionBukhara Yak-40 CCCP-87630 Tajikistan W/O 7 Aborted takeoff from Bukhara Airport, overrunning the runway and hitting a dike. Was due to operate a domestic scheduled Bukhara–Samarkand passenger service as Flight 124. [132][133]
24 December 1974 Soviet UnionBatoorino An-2 CCCP-15890 West Siberia W/O Unknown Crashed. [134]
1975 Unknown An-2R CCCP-09233 Ural W/O Unknown Undercarriage collapse on hard landing. [135]
16 January 1975 LaosSam Neua An-2P CCCP-70417 Ukraine W/O 12/12 Crashed into a mountain in poor weather at night near Sam Neua Airport. The aircraft was operating a domestic non-scheduled Vientiane-Sam Neua passenger service. [136]
28 January 1975 Soviet UnionZaporozhye Yak-40 CCCP-87825 Ukraine W/O 0 Crashed at Zaporozhye Airport as it rotated at too low speed. [137]
15 April 1975 Soviet UnionOmsk An-2TP CCCP-70177 Kazakhstan W/O Unknown Stalled following takeoff from Omsk Airport, banking to the left, crashing, and catching fire. [138]
28 April 1975 Soviet UnionPoltava An-24RV CCCP-46476 Ukraine W/O Unknown The aircraft descended below the glidepath and crashed short of the runway at Poltava Airport. [139]
20 May 1975 Unknown An-2 CCCP-43908 Yakut W/O Unknown Destroyed on landing. [140]
15 July 1975 Soviet UnionBatumi Yak-40 CCCP-87475 Armenia W/O 40/40 Struck a mountain following a go-around at Chorokh Airport. Was operating a domestic scheduled Yerevan–Batumi passenger service as Flight E-15. [141]
9 August 1975 Soviet UnionUlan-Ude Il-14M CCCP-52056 Leningrad W/O 11/11 The airplane went off the approach pattern to Ulan-Ude Airport and hit the ground in a cloudy scenario. [142]
15 August 1975 Soviet UnionKrasnovodsk Yak-40 CCCP-87323 Azerbaijan W/O 23/28 Crashed on final approach to Krasnovodsk Airport after the airplane descended below the glideslope due to an incorrect position of the flaps. It was completing a domestic scheduled Baku–Krasnovodsk passenger service as Flight A-53. [143][144]
30 August 1975 Unknown An-2R CCCP-70506 Belarus W/O Unknown Unknown [145]
30 August 1975 Soviet UnionNovosibirsk Tu-104B CCCP-42472 Ukraine W/O 0 Main undercarriage break-up upon hard landing at Tolmachevo Airport. [146]
18 September 1975 Soviet UnionOff Turukhansk An-2V CCCP-98302 Krasnoyarsk W/O 3/3 Flew into a 410-metre (1,350 ft) high hill, 72 kilometres (45 mi) northwest of Turukhansk. The aircraft was operating a military service for the Soviet Air Force. [147]
6 October 1975 Soviet UnionKirov Yak-40 CCCP-87328 Ural W/O Unknown Crashed at Kirov Airport following the failure of the three engines. [148]
22 October 1975 Soviet UnionNovgorod Yak-40 CCCP-87458 Latvia W/O 11 The airplane was operating a domestic scheduled SyktyvkarVologda–Novgorod–Riga passenger service as Flight A-98. When it was about to complete its second leg, the flightcrew attempted an approach to Novgorod Airport, despite poor visibility. The aircraft went off course, and both the undercarriage and the wings contacted buildings, causing it to crash and catch fire. All 6 occupants aboard perished in the accident, plus 5 people on the ground. [149][150]
17 November 1975 Soviet UnionGali An-24RV CCCP-46467 North Caucasus W/O 38/38 Went off course when trying to avoid a thunderstorm while en route a domestic scheduled Tbilisi–Sukhumi passenger service as Flight 6274. Crashed into a mountain 25 kilometres (16 mi) northeast of Gali. [151]
20 November 1975 Soviet UnionKharkov An-24B CCCP-46349 Belarus W/O 19/50 Hit trees on approach to Kharkov Airport, inbound from Rostov-on-Don, crashing into a hillside 17 kilometres (11 mi) west of the airport. There was a discrepancy between the aircraft's barometric altimeter and the actual altitude. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled passenger service as Flight 7950. [152][153]
12 December 1975 Soviet UnionKrasnoyarsk Il-18V CCCP-75801 Moscow W/O 0 Both nosegear and port main gear legs collapsed as the aircraft undershoot the runway when attempting to land in bad weather at Yemelyanovo Airport. [154]
15 December 1975 Soviet UnionFergana An-12B CCCP-11005 Yakut W/O 0 The landing gear was accidentally retracted on the take-off run at Fergana Airport. [155]
1976 Soviet UnionKiev Tu-154 CCCP-85020 International W/O 0 Hard landing. [156]
1976 Soviet UnionKiev Tu-104A CCCP-42371 East Siberia W/O Unknown Undershot the runway on landing at Borispol Airport following an in-flight shutdown of the engines. [157]
3 January 1976 Soviet UnionSanino Tu-124V CCCP-45037 North Caucasus W/O 61/61 Crashed shortly after takeoff from Vnukovo Airport after the crew lost visual amid a cloudy environment and became disoriented. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Moscow–Brest passenger service as Flight 2003. [158][159]
13 January 1976 Soviet UnionLeningrad An-24B CCCP-47280 Ural W/O 0 Hit trees on approach to Smolnoye Airport when it descended below the glidepath, and crashed near Leningrad; the crew had disregarded the ground proximity warning system. [160]
30 January 1976 Soviet UnionFrunze Airport Il-18V CCCP-75558 Kyrgyzstan W/O 6/6 Crashed after control was lost during a go-around. The aircraft was on a training flight. [161]
9 February 1976 Soviet UnionIrkutsk Tu-104A CCCP-42327 West Siberia W/O 24/115 Suddenly banked some 20° right immediately after takeoff from Irkutsk Airport; the aircraft hit the ground moments later with the right wing down forming an even greater angle relative to the horizon. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Irkutsk–Novosibirsk passenger service as Flight 3739. [162]
6 March 1976 Soviet UnionVerkhnyaya Khava Il-18E CCCP-75408 Armenia W/O 118 The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Moscow–Yerevan passenger service as Flight 909, when it crashed on approach to Yerevan Airport. Due to an electrical failure, several instruments, including the heading indicator and the autopilot, were not functional at the time of the accident. There were 111 occupants aboard; another 7 people were killed on the ground. [163]
10 March 1976 Soviet UnionSaratov Airport An-24RV CCCP-46613 Privolzhsk W/O 0 Hard landing. Overran the runway and crashed. [164]
24 March 1976 Soviet UnionAshgabat Airport Il-14LIK CCCP-61756 Kazakhstan W/O 6/6 Struck a mountain in a cloudy environment. [165]
11 April 1976 Soviet UnionKazachinsk An-2TP CCCP-09675 East Siberia W/O Unknown Crashed into mountainous terrain amid bad weather. All crewmembers perished in the accident, yet the number of fatalities was not disclosed. The aircraft was leased from Aeroflot. [166]
17 April 1976 Soviet UnionKursk An-2SKh CCCP-33170 Uzbekistan W/O Unknown Stalled upon takeoff and crashed. [167]
15 May 1976 Soviet UnionChernigov An-24RV CCCP-46534 Ukraine W/O 52/52 Entered the wake turbulence of a fighter, causing both the rudder to deflect sharply and the feathering of the propellers. The aircraft entered a spin, eventually crashing near Chernigov. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Kiev–Moscow passenger service as Flight 1802. [168]
16 May 1976 Soviet UnionSemipalatinsk An-2SKh CCCP-79935 Kazakhstan W/O 1/1 The aircraft was performing a crop spraying mission, when it crashed after a steep turn near Semipalatinsk, killing the pilot, who was drunk. [169]
1 June 1976 Equatorial GuineaBioko Island Tu-154A CCCP-85102 International W/O 45/45 Crashed while en route its first leg into a 750-metre (2,460 ft) high mountain. The aircraft was operating an international scheduled LuandaMalaboKinshasaTripoli–Moscow passenger service as Flight 418. The cause was not determined, but radar failure was suspected. [21][170]
12 June 1976 Soviet UnionNizhnevartovsk An-2R CCCP-32464 East Siberia W/O Unknown Went off course on approach to Nizhnevartovsk Airport and crashed into mountainous terrain 4.5 km (2.8 mi) away from Nizhnevartovsk. All crewmembers lost their lives in the accident, yet the number of fatalities was undisclosed. [171]
20 June 1976 Soviet UnionEngels An-2R CCCP-70819 Privolzhsk W/O Unknown Crashed. [172]
26 June 1976 Soviet UnionKazan An-2 CCCP-70764 Privolzhsk W/O 1 Hit a transmission tower after it lost height due to a loss of power, crashed and was destroyed by fire. [173]
30 June 1976 Soviet UnionValikhanovskiy District An-2R CCCP-70531 Central W/O 2/2 Experienced an inflight failure on one of the propeller blades owing to fatigue. Violent vibrations caused the engine mount to fail, leading to the shift of the powerplant to the left, and causing the propeller to cut through the spar, which damaged the port wingbox. The aircraft eventually entered a spin and crashed. [174]
17 July 1976 Soviet UnionChita Airport Tu-104A CCCP-42335 East Siberia W/O 0 Failed to get airborne due to overloading. [175]
23 July 1976 Soviet UnionSokolskoye[disambiguation needed] An-2R CCCP-35088 Moscow SPiMVL W/O 2 Hit trees and crashed. [176]
3 August 1976 Soviet UnionPopovka[disambiguation needed] An-2R CCCP-70190 Central W/O Unknown Crashed under unspecified circumstances. [177]
13 August 1976 Soviet UnionGuryev Airport An-24B CCCP-47734 Kazakhstan W/O 0 Crashed short of the runway on landing. [178]
9 September 1976 Soviet UnionBlack Sea An-24RV CCCP-46518 East Siberia W/O 46/46 Head-on, mid-air collision, 37 km (23 mi) south of Anapa. The An-24RV was operating a passenger service between Donetsk and Adler as Flight 7957, with 46 people aboard. The Yak-40 was flying the Rostov-on-Don–Kerch route as Flight 31 with 14 passengers and a crew of 4 on board. [179][180]
Yak-40 CCCP-87772 North Caucasus W/O 18/18
26 September 1976 Soviet UnionNovosibirsk An-2 CCCP-79868 West Siberia W/O 12 The pilot intentionally crashed the aircraft into a building where his former wife —from whom he had divorced— lived. [181]
30 October 1976 Soviet UnionTashkent Airport Il-18V CCCP-75575 Uzbekistan W/O 0 Overran the runway on landing in bad weather. [182]
28 November 1976 Soviet UnionMoscow Tu-104B CCCP-42471 Northern W/O 72/72 Crashed 29 km (18 mi) away from Sheremetyevo Airport amid inclement weather. Malfunction of the artificial horizon caused the pilots to become disorientated and exceed bank limits. Due to operate the Moscow–Leningrad route as Flight 2415. [183][184][185]
16 December 1976 Soviet UnionZaporozhye Yak-40 CCCP-87638 Ukraine W/O 5/5 Crashed during a training flight after stalling, 20 km (12 mi) northwest of Zaporozhye. [186]
17 December 1976 Soviet UnionUst-Kut Yak-40 CCCP-88208 East Siberia W/O 7/7 Crashed into trees shortly after takeoff from Ust-Kut Airport, during initial climbout. [187]
17 December 1976 Soviet UnionKiev An-24 CCCP-46722 Ukraine W/O 48/55 Flew below the glideslope amid reduced visibility on approach to Zhulyany Airport, eventually colliding with a concrete embankment. Was operating a domestic scheduled Chernovtsy–Kiev passenger service as Flight H-36. [188][189]
18 December 1976 Soviet UnionYuzhno-Sakhalinsk Il-14M CCCP-61752 Far East W/O 8/10 Went off the approach course to Yuzhno-Sakhalinsk Airport while operating a research flight. Crashed into mountainous terrain. [190]
1977 Soviet UnionJurbarkas An-2 CCCP-32032 Latvia W/O 0 The collapse of the port main undercarriage upon crash landing led to an irreparable damage of the port wing. [191]
13 January 1977 Soviet UnionAlma-Ata Tu-104A CCCP-42369 Far East W/O 96/96 The aircraft was operating a scheduled domestic Khabarovsk–Novosibirsk–Dushanbe passenger service as Flight 3843 when it suffered a fire breakout on one of its engines. While dumping fuel to make an emergency landing at Alma-Ata Airport, the fire reached the fuel tanks, which exploded; the aircraft crashed 3.5 km (2.2 mi) away from the airport. [1][192][193][194][195]
15 February 1977 Soviet UnionMineralnye Vody Il-18V CCCP-75520 Uzbekistan W/O 77/77 Stalled following a missed approach procedure and crashed near Mineralnye Vody. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Tashkent-Yuzhniy Airport–Mineralnye Vody Airport passenger service as Flight 5003. [1][196][197][198]
6 March 1977 Unknown An-2TP CCCP-40572 Yakut W/O Unknown Veered off the runway, crashing into a building. [199]
30 March 1977 Soviet UnionZhdanov Yak-40 CCCP-87738 Ukraine W/O 8/27 The starboard wing hit a pole while on final approach to Zhdanov Airport. The aircraft banked and struck the ground before it broke up and caught fire. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Dnepropetrovsk–Zhdanov passenger service as Flight H-925. [200][201]
5 April 1977 Soviet UnionPenyok Il-14FKM CCCP-61675 West Siberia W/O 6/6 Crashed into the ground, following the loss of rudder control. The aircraft was on a training flight. [202]
7 May 1977 Soviet UnionTavda An-2 CCCP-15925 Tyumen W/O Unknown Collided 11 km (6.8 mi) south of Tavda. No further information is available. [203][204]
An-2 CCCP-44992 Ural W/O
27 May 1977 CubaHavana Il-62M CCCP-86614 International W/O 69 Struck power lines on approach to José Martí International Airport, crashing and killing all but two of the 70 occupants of the aircraft, plus one more on the ground. The airplane was operating an international scheduled Moscow–FrankfurtLisbon–Havana passenger service as Flight 331. [1][205][206]
8 July 1977 Soviet UnionOff Sukhumi Airport An-24RV CCCP-46847 Kirovograd Flight School W/O 6/7 Descended gradually until it crashed into the Black Sea, probably because the pilot became distracted with nearby storm activity. The aircraft was on a training flight from Sukhumi to Kirovograd. [207]
20 July 1977 Soviet UnionVitim Avia 14M CCCP-52096 East Siberia W/O 39/40 Attempted a tailwind takeoff from Vitim Airport. The aircraft drifted off the runway, hit trees, stalled and crashed into a woodland. The aircraft was due to operate a domestic scheduled Vitim-Irkutsk passenger service as Flight B-2. [208]
18 August 1977 Soviet UnionUst-Kuyga An-26 CCCP-26536 Yakut W/O 0 Hard landing. [209]
18 October 1977 Unknown An-2 CCCP-55625 Yakut W/O Unknown Crashed under unspecified circumstances. [210]
27 October 1977 Soviet UnionCape Chelyuskin Il-14M CCCP-04195 Krasnoyarsk W/O Unknown Crashed after going off course on approach to Cape Chelyuskin Airport. [211]
9 December 1977 Soviet UnionTarko-Sale An-24RV CCCP-47695 Tyumen W/O 17/23 Crashed and caught fire upon takeoff from Tarko-Sale Airport because of an incorrect position of the flaps. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Tarko-Sale–Surgut passenger service as Flight 134. [212][213]
1978 Unknown An-12BP CCCP-11125 Yakut W/O 0 A vessel containing acid broke in the cargo hold while the aircraft was being loaded at some previous time. [214]
1 February 1978 Soviet UnionKrasnoye[disambiguation needed] An-2TP CCCP-40570 Central W/O Unknown Collided with another An-2TP, tail number CCCP-40563, owing to air traffic controllers error. Landed safely, without any reported fatality on board. All occupants of CCCP-40563 perished in the accident. [215]
18 February 1978 Soviet UnionNovosibirsk Tu-154A CCCP-85087 West Siberia W/O 0 A fire that broke out in the passenger cabin engulfed the rear part of the airframe. The aircraft was standing on the apron at Tolmachevo Airport. [216]
8 April 1978 Soviet UnionAldan Yak-40 CCCP-87911 Yakut W/O 0 Stalled upon takeoff from Aldan Airport, and crashed. [217]
6 May 1978 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown 1 Hijacking. The airplane was flying the Ashgabat–Mineralnye Vody route. [218]
19 May 1978 Soviet UnionMaksatiha Tu-154B CCCP-85169 Azerbaijan W/O 4/134 Crash-landed 5.3 km (3.3 mi) from Maksatiha, Tver Oblast, following the stoppage of all three engines soon afterwards the flight engineer accidentally disconnected the automatic transferring of fuel to the sump tank. The aircraft was operating a Baku–Leningrad passenger service as Flight 6709. [219]
18 June 1978 Unknown An-2R CCCP-02846 Yakut W/O Unknown Damaged beyond repair in an accident. No further details are available. [220]
2 October 1978 Soviet UnionTbilisi Yak-40 CCCP-87544 Privolzhsk W/O 0 Was operating a domestic scheduled Volgograd–Tbilisi passenger service. Experienced a hydraulic failure prior to land at Tbilisi Airport. The aircraft overran the runway following touchdown, hitting a concrete mast and breaking up in three. [221]
7 October 1978 Soviet UnionSverdlovsk Yak-40 CCCP-87437 Kazakhstan W/O 38/38 Experienced the failure of the port engine shortly after take-off from Koltsovo Airport, owing to icing conditions. The aircraft lost height and crashed into a hill. Due to operate a domestic Sverdlovsk–Kostanay passenger service as Flight 1080. [222][223]
23 October 1978 Soviet UnionSivash An-24B CCCP-46327 North Caucasus W/O 26/26 Crashed in the Gulf of Sivash after experiencing dual engine flameout due to icing conditions while en route at 2,400 metres (7,900 ft). The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Krasnodar-Simferopol passenger service as Flight 6515. [224]
14 November 1978 SwedenStockholm Tu-154B-1 CCCP-85286 International Repaired 0/74 Overran the runway and crashed after the nose failed to lift up. The aircraft was operating an international scheduled Stockholm-Moscow passenger service as Flight 212. [225]
30 November 1978 Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown Unknown 1 Hijacking. The aircraft was covering the Krasnodar–Baku route. [226]
19 December 1978 Soviet UnionSamarkand An-24B CCCP-46299 Uzbekistan W/O 5/5 Crashed on approach to Samarkand Airport with only one engine working. [227]
2 January 1979 AntarcticaMolodezhnaya Station Il-14FKM CCCP-04193 Central W/O 4/7 Crashed upon takeoff because of a failure on the port engine. The aircraft had 7 occupants aboard; 4 of them died in the accident. [228]
15 January 1979 Soviet UnionMinsk An-24B CCCP-46807 Ukraine W/O 13/14 The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Kiev–Minsk passenger service as Flight 7502 when it crashed 5.3 km (3.3 mi) northwest of Minsk-1 Airport, on approach, after control was lost following the loss of longitudinal stability; the pilot had prematurely switched off the de-icing system and the aircraft encountered icing conditions along its flight path when it flew through clouds. [229][230]
18 January 1979 Soviet UnionBelgorod L-410M CCCP-67210 Central W/O 3/3 Crashed while operating a training flight. [231]
12 March 1979 Unknown An-2TP CCCP-40594 Yakut W/O Unknown Broke through the icy surface of a lake and sank. [232]
17 March 1979 Soviet UnionMoscow Tu-104B CCCP-42444 Ukraine W/O 58/119 A false fire alarm in one of the engines prompted the crew to fly the aircraft back to Vnukovo Airport. On approach to the airport in poor visibility, the airplane descended below the glideslope and one wing hit an electricity pylon, then contacted the top of a hill, and eventually crashed into a frozen field, where the airframe lost the wings and the cockpit. Cockpit- and wing-less, the fuselage slid for some 200 metres (660 ft) over the snowy surface before coming to rest. Due to operate a domestic scheduled Moscow–Odessa passenger service. [233]
20 March 1979 Soviet UnionChardzou Yak-40 CCCP-87930 Turkmenistan W/O 0/29 Entered the wake turbulence of a Mil Mi-6 and crashed at Chardzhou Airport. [234]
22 March 1979 Soviet UnionLiepaya Tu-134A CCCP-65031 Latvia W/O 4/5 The aircraft was operating the last leg of an Omsk–Gorkiy–Liepaya cargo service when it went off its extended centerline on approach to Liepaya Airport as it descended below the glideslope in poor visibility, crashing and catching fire after hitting trees. [235]
25 March 1979 Soviet UnionBaykit An-26 CCCP-26569 Ural W/O 4/4 Hit trees on approach to Baykit Airport and crashed. [236]
10 May 1979 Soviet UnionSochi Il-18D CCCP-75414 Ural W/O 0 Crashed at Sochi Airport after an aborted takeoff. [237]
19 May 1979 Soviet UnionUfa Tu-134A CCCP-65839 Moldova W/O 0 Landed at Ufa Airport with its wheel brakes locked, veering off the runway and causing the fuel tank to rupture, subsequently catching fire. [238]
31 May 1979 Soviet UnionTyumen Tu-134A CCCP-65649 Tyumen W/O 0 The airplane experienced a tyre burst that ignited the hydraulic fluid upon touchdown at Tyumen Airport. [239]
16 June 1979 Soviet UnionPetropavlovsk-Kamchatsky An-2T CCCP-44920 Unknown W/O 0/1 Stolen by a drunk pilot at Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky Airport. The plane stalled in a low altitude maneuver and crashed upside down. [240]
3 July 1979 Soviet UnionKrasnaya Polyana[disambiguation needed] An-2M CCCP-02330 Ukraine W/O Unknown Collided with a transmission tower. [241]
3 August 1979 Soviet UnionLeningrad L-410M CCCP-67206 Central W/O 14/14 Crashed on approach to Rzhevka Airport following an engine failure. [242]
11 August 1979 Soviet UnionDneprodzerzhinsk Tu-134AK CCCP-65735 Belarus W/O 178/178 Both aircraft were involved in a mid-air collision at an approximate altitude of 8,400 m (27,600 ft). The Tu-134AK had departed from Donetsk Airport and was en route to Minsk as Flight 7880 with 84 occupants aboard — 77 passengers and a crew of 7 — while the other aircraft was operating the last leg of a domestic scheduled ChelyabinskVoronezh–Kishinev passenger service as Flight 7628 with 94 people on board — 88 passengers and six crewmembers — All occupants of both aircraft lost their lives. [243][244][245]
Tu-134A CCCP-65816 Moldova W/O
23 August 1979 Soviet UnionYeniseysk An-12TB CCCP-12963 Krasnoyarsk W/O 11/16 The aircraft was en route from Norilsk to Krasnoyarsk on a cargo service when it crashed 18 km (11 mi) away from Yeniseysk following the flameout of all engines due to fuel contamination. [246]
29 August 1979 Soviet UnionKirsanov Tu-124V CCCP-45038 Privolzhsk W/O 63/63 The crew lost control of the aircraft due to an extension of the flaps while en route from Borispol Airport to Kazan Airport. The airplane subsequently entered a spinning dive, disintegrating at an altitude of 3,000 m (9,800 ft) over Kirsanov because of the overstress the airframe underwent. It was operating a domestic scheduled Odessa–Kiev–Kazan passenger service as Flight 5484. [247][248]
3 September 1979 Soviet UnionAmderma An-24B CCCP-46269 Northern W/O 40/43 The aircraft undershot the runway at Amderma Airport and crashed. On approach, the crew descended below the glidescope and the ground proximity warning system sounded, yet the crew continued to descend. The aircraft broke up after impact and the main wreckage came to rest 20–30 m from the Kara Sea. The aircraft was operating a domestic scheduled Arkangelsk-Amderma service as Flight A-513. [249]
20 September 1979 Soviet UnionMalyushin Airfield An-2R CCCP-56413 Belarus W/O Unknown Unknown [250]
13 October 1979 Unknown An-2R CCCP-70805 Yakut W/O Unknown Crashed in an open field and was consumed by fire. [251]
27 October 1979 Soviet UnionLensk An-2TP CCCP-32322 Yakut W/O 3/12 The rear door opened during takeoff. Two passengers left their seats to close the door, causing the center of gravity to move past the rear limit. The nose pitched up; the aircraft stalled and struck the runway. The aircraft was due to operate a domestic passenger service. [252]
30 October 1979 DenmarkOff Denmark Il-14M CCCP-61683 Moscow SPiMVL W/O 0/0 Destroyed by a fire that erupted aboard the ship (MV Olyenok) the aircraft was being carried upon. An An-2 was also destroyed. [253]
16 November 1979 Soviet UnionVologda Yak-40 CCCP-87454 Leningrad W/O 3/5 The aircraft was being ferried from Veliky Ustyug Airport to Vologda Airport as Flight 564 when it struck tree tops and crashed on approach to the airport of destination as it descended below the glideslope amid fog. [254][255]
9 December 1979 Soviet UnionCherskiy An-26 CCCP-26547 Yakut W/O 7/7 Lost control and crashed due to shifting cargo. [256]

See also[edit]


Footnotes[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ There exists a discrepancy over the death toll, as it was also claimed it rose to 93.[21]
  2. ^ This event has also been reported to have taken place in August 1971 (1971-08); there is a discrepancy in the number of fatalities.[21][41]
  3. ^ There exists a discrepancy over the number of fatalities, as it was claimed to be 108,[57] and 122.[58]
  4. ^ Both the date of occurrence and the number of fatalities are discrepant for this accident. It is claimed it took place on 1 October,[64] or 2 October;[57] the death toll was reported to be 108,[64] or 100.[57]
  5. ^ Figures for the death toll of this accident are discrepant, as the number of fatalities was reported to be 174,[66] or 176.[67]
  6. ^ Also reported to had been CCCP-42379.[84]
  7. ^ There exists a discrepancy over the date the accident took place, as some sources reported it occurred on 24 June 1974[115]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Flight safety 1977—a safe year for scheduled passengers" (PDF). Flight International: 182. 21 January 1978. Retrieved 25 January 2012. 
  2. ^ "Aeroflot flies blind" (PDF). Flight International. 11 December 1976. Retrieved 25 January 2012. 
  3. ^ "Commercial aircraft of the world – An-10A Ukraine" (PDF). Flight International: 112. 25 July 1958. Retrieved 25 January 2012. 
  4. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46241 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 January 2012.
  5. ^ Accident description for CCCP-15238 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 January 2012.
  6. ^ Accident description for CCCP-47701 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  7. ^ Accident description for CCCP-45083 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 August 2012.
  8. ^ Accident description for CCCP-40573 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  9. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75798 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  10. ^ Accident description for CCCP-61637 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  11. ^ Accident description for CCCP-12966 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  12. ^ Accident description for CCCP-58340 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  13. ^ Accident description for CCCP-25598 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  14. ^ Accident description for CCCP-47751 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 September 2011.
  15. ^ Accident description for CCCP-52002 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 August 2012.
  16. ^ Accident description for CCCP-06333 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  17. ^ Accident description for CCCP-15935 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  18. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11149 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  19. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75533 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 January 2012.
  20. ^ Accident description for CCCP-09303 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 January 2012.
  21. ^ a b c d e f "Aeroflot known accident record 1966–76". Flight International: 1695. 11 December 1976. Archived from the original on 10 September 2012. Retrieved 10 September 2012. 
  22. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11188 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 August 2012.
  23. ^ Accident description for CCCP-45012 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 January 2012.
  24. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87690 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  25. ^ Accident description for CCCP-02195 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 January 2012.
  26. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11031 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  27. ^ Hijacking description for CCCP-46256 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  28. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75578 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  29. ^ Accident description for CCCP-84777 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 August 2014.
  30. ^ Accident description for CCCP-09305 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 January 2012.
  31. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75773 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 January 2012.
  32. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11000 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 July 2014.
  33. ^ Accident description for CCCP-12996 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 January 2012.
  34. ^ Accident description for CCCP-91535 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 January 2012.
  35. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11374 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  36. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11145 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  37. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-10 Приволжского УГА близ Ворошиловграда" [Accident An-10 Voroshilovgrad] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 10 August 2012. 
  38. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46747 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  39. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11024 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  40. ^ Accident description for CCCP-47729 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  41. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-42405 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 January 2012.
  42. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87719 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 January 2012.
  43. ^ Accident description for CCCP-12993 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 January 2012.
  44. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42490 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  45. ^ Accident description for CCCP-47678 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  46. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11137 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  47. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46809 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  48. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46378 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 August 2014.
  49. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46788 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  50. ^ Accident description for CCCP-91570 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 August 2014.
  51. ^ Accident description for CCCP-41295 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  52. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46732 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 August 2014.
  53. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46418 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  54. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42408 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  55. ^ Accident description for CCCP-44937 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  56. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87778 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  57. ^ a b c d e "Accidents to public transport operator's aircraft – 1972—Scheduled passenger flights" (PDF). Flight International: 92. 18 January 1973. Retrieved 11 January 2012. 
  58. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-11215 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 10 August 2012.
  59. ^ "Aircraft losses" (PDF). Flight International: 748. 25 May 1972. Retrieved 9 September 2011. An Aeroflot An-10 is reported to have crashed at Kharkov with the loss of all on board on May 18. 
  60. ^ Accident description for CCCP-91537 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 August 2014.
  61. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75663 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 January 2012.
  62. ^ Accident description for CCCP-74298 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  63. ^ "Катастрофа Ил-18В Казахского УГА близ Магнитогорска" [Accident Il-18V near Magnitogorsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 10 August 2012. 
  64. ^ a b c Accident description for CCCP-75507 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  65. ^ "Катастрофа Ил-18В Московского ТУ ГА в районе а/п Сочи (Адлер)" [Accident Il-18V Sochi (Adler)] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 10 August 2012. 
  66. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-86671 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 10 August 2012.
  67. ^ a b "ACCIDENTS TO PUBLIC TRANSPORT OPERATORS' AIRCRAFT – 1972—NON-SCHEDULED PASSENGER FLIGHTS" (pdf). Flight International: 92. 18 January 1973. Retrieved 3 September 2011. 
  68. ^ "Aeroflot accident at Moscow" (pdf). Flight International: 517. 19 October 1972. Retrieved 3 September 2011. In what seems likely to be the world's worst aircraft accident, 168 passengers and eight crew were killed when an Il-62 of Aeroflot crashed on the approach to Moscow, Sheremetyevo, Airport on October 13. The aircraft was on a non-scheduled flight from Paris via Leningrad and it was reported to have crashed while making its approach in bad weather. 
  69. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46202 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 January 2012.
  70. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11360 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 January 2012.
  71. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87819 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 January 2012.
  72. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46276 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 10 August 2012.
  73. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11341 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 29 December 2011.
  74. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85023 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 August 2014.
  75. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75712 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 February 2012.
  76. ^ "Катастрофа Ил-18В Таджикского УГА близ Ленинабада" [Accident Il-18V near Leninabad] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 10 August 2012. 
  77. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87602 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 29 December 2011.
  78. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 Казахского УГА близ аэропорта Семипалатинска" [Accident Yak-40 Semipalatinsk Airport] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 10 August 2012. 
  79. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 29 December 2011.[dead link]
  80. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42505 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 29 December 2011.
  81. ^ Accident description for CCCP-04244 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  82. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85030 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 29 December 2011.
  83. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75687 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 2 January 2012.
  84. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-42411 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 2 January 2012.
  85. ^ "Взрыв на борту и катастрофа Ту-104А Восточно-Сибирского УГА в районе Читы" [Explosion and crash Tu-104A Chita] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 10 August 2012. 
  86. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65668 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  87. ^ "Aeroflot crash at Amman" (pdf). Flight International: 4. 5 July 1973. Retrieved 3 September 2011. An Aeroflot Tu-134, CCCP 65668, crashed on take-off from Amman, Jordan, on June 30. The aircraft appeared to fail to get airborne and overran the runway by 500m before striking a house. Of the 77 passengers and crew, one passenger and one crew were killed; in addition seven people on the ground were killed. The aircraft was operating a scheduled service to Beirut; Reuter reported that the flight-data recorder was recovered on July 1. 
  88. ^ Accident description for CCCP-91534 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  89. ^ Accident description for CCCP-45062 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 January 2012.
  90. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-124В Приволжского УГА (нелокализованное разрушение двигателя)" [Accident Tu-124V Kuybyshev] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 26 November 2012. 
  91. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87790 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 January 2012.
  92. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46435 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 January 2012.
  93. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42506 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 30 December 2012.
  94. ^ Accident description for CCCP-12967 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 August 2012.
  95. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-12Б Якутского УГА близ Магадана" [Accident An-12B Magadan] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 12 August 2012. 
  96. ^ Accident description for CCCP-71209 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 January 2012.
  97. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42486 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 July 2012.
  98. ^ "Public transport accidents". Flight International: 688. 25 October 1973. Archived from the original on 26 July 2012. Retrieved 26 July 2012. An Aeroflot Tu-104 crashed on landing at Moscow Domodedovo on October 13. The aircraft was at the end of a flight from Tbilisi. The total number of people on board has not been announced, but there were 28 fatalities. 
  99. ^ Hijacking description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 30 December 2011.
  100. ^ Accident description for CCCP-45031 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 30 December 2011.
  101. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42503 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 August 2012.
  102. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-104Б Грузинского УГА в а/п Домодедово" [Accident Tu-104B Domodeovo] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 12 August 2012. 
  103. ^ Accident description for CCCP-45061 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 30 December 2011.
  104. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-124В Литовского УГА в Волоколамском р-не МО" [Accident Tu-124V in Volochamsk district] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 26 March 2014. 
  105. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87629 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 August 2014.
  106. ^ Accident description for CCCP-45044 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 August 2012.
  107. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-124В Приволжского УГА близ Львова" [Accident Tu-124V Lviv] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 12 August 2012. 
  108. ^ Accident description for CCCP-04342 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 December 2011.
  109. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46357 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 December 2011.
  110. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-24Б Украинского УГА близ Мукачево" [Accident An-24B Mukachevo] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 12 August 2012. 
  111. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46277 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 December 2011.
  112. ^ Accident description for CCCP-73960 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 December 2011.
  113. ^ Incident description for CCCP-52053 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 December 2011.
  114. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87369 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 December 2011.
  115. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-75405 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 December 2011.
  116. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75559 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 December 2011.
  117. ^ Hugh Field (23 January 1975). "The 1974 fatal accidents – FATAL ACCIDENTS: SCHEDULED PASSENGER SERVICES" (PDF). Flight International: 115. Retrieved 21 September 2011. 
  118. ^ Accident description for CCCP-12950 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 December 2011.
  119. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87398 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 December 2011.
  120. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 Липецкого ОАО в а/п Ростов-на-Дону" [Accident Yak-40 Roston-ov-Don] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 12 August 2012. 
  121. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75425 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  122. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87579 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 August 2012.
  123. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 Украинского УГА близ Киева" [Accident Yak-40 near Kiev] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 12 August 2012. 
  124. ^ Accident description for CCCP-35029 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2011.
  125. ^ Accident description for CCCP-04302 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  126. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11030 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 December 2011.
  127. ^ Accident description for CCCP-70766 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 December 2011.
  128. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42501 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 December 2011.
  129. ^ Accident description for CCCP-91515 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  130. ^ Accident description for CCCP-12985 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  131. ^ Accident description for CCCP-49342 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 December 2011.
  132. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87630 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 December 2011.
  133. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 Таджикского УГА в а/п Бухара" [Accident Yak-40 Bukhara] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 12 August 2012. 
  134. ^ Accident description for CCCP-15890 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 December 2011.
  135. ^ Accident description for CCCP-09233 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 December 2011.
  136. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 August 2014.
  137. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87825 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 October 2012.
  138. ^ Accident description for CCCP-70177 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 December 2011.
  139. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46476 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 December 2011.
  140. ^ Accident description for CCCP-43908 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 December 2011.
  141. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87475 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  142. ^ Accident description for CCCP-52056 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  143. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87323 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 December 2011.
  144. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 Азербайджанского УГА близ Красноводска" [Accident Yak-40 Krasnovodsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 26 November 2012. 
  145. ^ Accident description for CCCP-70506 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  146. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42472 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 December 2011.
  147. ^ Accident description for CCCP-98302 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 December 2011.
  148. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87328 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 December 2011.
  149. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87458 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 December 2011.
  150. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 Латвийского УГА в Новгороде" [Accident Yak-40 Novgorod] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 26 November 2012. 
  151. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46467 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 December 2011.
  152. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46349 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 December 2011.
  153. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-24Б Белорусского УГА близ Харькова" [Accident An-24B Kharkov] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 21 October 2014. 
  154. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75801 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 December 2011.
  155. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11005 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 December 2011.
  156. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85020 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 November 2011.
  157. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42371 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 November 2012.
  158. ^ Accident description for CCCP-45037 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 September 2011.
  159. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-124В Белорусского УГА в районе а/п Внуково" [Accident Tu-124V Vnukovo] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 26 November 2012. 
  160. ^ Accident description for CCCP-47280 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  161. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75558 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 October 2011.
  162. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42327 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 November 2011.
  163. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75408 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 October 2011.
  164. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46613 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  165. ^ Accident description for CCCP-61756 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 October 2011.
  166. ^ Accident description for CCCP-09675 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 November 2011.
  167. ^ Accident description for CCCP-33170 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 November 2011.
  168. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46534 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 August 2012.
  169. ^ Accident description for CCCP-79935 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 October 2011.
  170. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85102 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  171. ^ Accident description for CCCP-32464 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 November 2011.
  172. ^ Accident description for CCCP-70819 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  173. ^ Accident description for CCCP-70764 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  174. ^ Accident description for CCCP-70531 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  175. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42335 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  176. ^ Accident description for CCCP-35088 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 9 November 2011.
  177. ^ Accident description for CCCP-70190 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 November 2011.
  178. ^ Accident description for CCCP-47734 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  179. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46518 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 November 2011.
  180. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87772 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 November 2011.
  181. ^ Accident description for CCCP-79868 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 November 2011.
  182. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75575 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  183. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42471 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 August 2012.
  184. ^ "Public-transport accidents" (PDF). Flight International: 1694. 11 December 1976. Retrieved 25 January 2012. 
  185. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-104Б Ленинградского ОАО в районе а/п Шереметьево" [Accident Tu-104B Sheremetyevo Airport] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 13 August 2012. 
  186. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87638 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 November 2011.
  187. ^ Accident description for CCCP-88208 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 November 2011.
  188. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46722 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 September 2011.
  189. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-24 Украинского УГА в р-не а/п Жуляны" [Accident An-24 Zhulyany] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 13 August 2012. 
  190. ^ Accident description for CCCP-61752 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 5 November 2011.
  191. ^ Accident description for CCCP-32032 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 October 2011.
  192. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42369 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 November 2011.
  193. ^ "Airline accidents" (pdf). Flight International: 332. 12 February 1977. Retrieved 3 September 2011. The crash of an Aeroflot Tu-104 near Alma Ata is now believed to have happened on January 13. The aircraft is said to have been carrying between 90 and 96 passengers and crew, all of whom were killed. Witnesses have reported that the aircraft exploded at a height of 1,000ft while apparently orbiting to burn off fuel following an engine failure. The aircraft was flying from Khabarovsk to Doushanbe and had made a scheduled stop at Novosibirsk. 
  194. ^ "Airline accidents" (pdf). Flight International: 212. 29 January 1977. Retrieved 3 September 2011. An Aeroflot Tu-104 is reported to have crashed near Alma Ata early in January, killing all 90 people on board. Engine failure is mentioned in reports reaching the West. 
  195. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-104А Дальневосточного УГА в районе а/п Алма-Ата" [Accident Tu-104A Alma-Ata] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 13 August 2012. 
  196. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75520 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 November 2011.
  197. ^ "Airline accidents" (pdf). Flight International: 507. 5 March 1977. Retrieved 3 September 2011. An Aeroflot Il-18 crashed on February 15 while on a scheduled flight from Tashkent to Mineralniye Vody. The airline says that there were fatalities but will reveal no further details of the accident. 
  198. ^ "Катастрофа Ил-18В Узбекского УГА в районе Минеральных Вод" [Accident Il-18V Mineralnye Vody] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 13 August 2012. 
  199. ^ Accident description for CCCP-40572 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 October 2011.
  200. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87738 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 October 2011.
  201. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 Украинского УГА близ Жданова" [Accident Yak-40 Zhdanov] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 13 August 2012. 
  202. ^ Accident description for CCCP-61675 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  203. ^ Accident description for CCCP-15925 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 November 2011.
  204. ^ Accident description for CCCP-44992 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 November 2011.
  205. ^ Accident description for CCCP-86614 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 January 2012.
  206. ^ "Катастрофа Ил-62М ЦУ МВС близ Гаваны (Куба)" [Accident Il-62M Havana] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 7 August 2012. 
  207. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46847 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 November 2011.
  208. ^ Accident description for CCCP-52096 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  209. ^ Accident description for CCCP-26536 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 November 2011.
  210. ^ Accident description for CCCP-55625 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 November 2011.
  211. ^ Accident description for CCCP-04195 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 November 2011.
  212. ^ Accident description for CCCP-47695 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 17 November 2011.
  213. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-24РВ Тюменского УГА в Тарко-Сале" [Accident An-24RV Tarko-Sale] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 13 August 2012. 
  214. ^ Incident description for CCCP-11125 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 November 2011.
  215. ^ Accident description for CCCP-40570 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 January 2012.
  216. ^ Incident description for CCCP-85087 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 November 2011.
  217. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87911 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  218. ^ Hijacking description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 December 2011.
  219. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85169 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 September 2011.
  220. ^ Accident description for CCCP-02846 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 November 2011.
  221. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87544 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 24 November 2011.
  222. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87437 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 January 2012.
  223. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 Казахского УГА близ а/п Кольцово" [Accident Yak-40 near Koltsovo] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 13 August 2012. 
  224. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46327 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 August 2012.
  225. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85286 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  226. ^ Hijacking description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 December 2011.
  227. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46299 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 19 November 2011.
  228. ^ Accident description for CCCP-04193 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 November 2011.
  229. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46807 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 1 December 2011.
  230. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-24Б Украинского УГА близ а/п Минск-1" [Accident An-24 Minsk-1] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 13 August 2012. 
  231. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67210 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 1 December 2011.
  232. ^ Accident description for CCCP-40594 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 December 2011.
  233. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42444 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 November 2011.
  234. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87930 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 December 2011.
  235. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65031 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 November 2011.
  236. ^ Accident description for CCCP-26569 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 November 2011.
  237. ^ Accident description for CCCP-75414 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  238. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65839 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 December 2011.
  239. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65649 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 December 2011.
  240. ^ Accident description for CCCP-44920 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 December 2011.
  241. ^ Accident description for CCCP-02330 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 December 2011.
  242. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67206 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 1 December 2011.
  243. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65735 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 November 2011.
  244. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65816 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 November 2011.
  245. ^ "Столкновение двух Ту-134А Белорусского УГА и Молдавского РПО ГА близ Днепродзержинска. Гибель футбольной команды "Пахтакор"" [Tu-134 collision Dniprodzerzhynsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 8 August 2012. 
  246. ^ Accident description for CCCP-12963 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 1 December 2011.
  247. ^ Accident description for CCCP-45038 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 1 December 2011.
  248. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-124В Приволжского УГА в Тамбовской области" [Accident Tu-124V Kirsanov] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 13 August 2012. 
  249. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46269 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 3 August 2012.
  250. ^ Accident description for CCCP-56413 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  251. ^ Accident description for CCCP-70805 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 December 2011.
  252. ^ Accident description for CCCP-32322 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.
  253. ^ Accident description for CCCP-61683 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 7 August 2014.
  254. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87454 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 1 December 2011.
  255. ^ "Катастрофа Як-40 Ленинградского УГА близ а/п Вологда" [Accident Yak-40 Vologda] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 26 November 2012. 
  256. ^ Accident description for CCCP-26547 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 October 2012.