Aeroflot accidents and incidents in the 1990s

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Aeroflot accidents and incidents in the 1990s
Aeroflot A310-300 F-OGQR LHR 1994-8-5.png
An Airbus A310-300, similar to the one involved in the crash of Flight 593, is seen here on short final to London Heathrow Airport in August 1994 (1994-08).

After the dissolution of the Soviet Union in December 1991 (1991-12), its former republics started establishing their own carriers from the corresponding directorates Aeroflot had at these countries, causing the airline to shrink drastically.[1][2][3] The fleet reduced from several thousands aircraft to a number slightly over 100 in 1993,[4] helping the former Soviet Union's national airline to improve its accidents and incidents record sharply. The company experienced 42 events between 1990 and 1991 only, and had 41 occurrences in the rest of the decade. Despite this, the three deadliest accidents the airline went through in the decade occurred in the post-Soviet era, leaving a death toll of 257, each one involving more than 50 fatalities.

The worst accident took place in December 1995 (1995-12), when a Tupolev Tu-154B dived uncontrollably from an altitude of 9,600 metres (31,500 ft) and crashed, killing all 98 occupants aboard.[5] The second deadliest event involved a Tupolev Tu-134A that contacted trees on approach to Ivanovo Airport in August 1992 (1992-08), crashing and killing all 84 passengers and crew on board.[6] Both the most infamous crash and the third worst accident for the company in the decade occurred in March 1994 (1994-03) when an Airbus A310 that was flying the MoscowHong Kong route crashed in the Kemerovo Oblast shortly after the captain's son manipulated the controls of the aircraft, with the loss of 75 lives.[7][8]

Overall, 623 people lost their lives either on board Aeroflot aircraft or on the ground. The number of aircraft the airline wrote off during the decade rose to 80, split into an Airbus A310-300, four Antonov An-12s, an Antonov An-124, 23 Antonov An-2s, six Antonov An-24s, two Antonov An-26s, four Antonov An-28s,one Antonov An-30, one Antonov An-74, one Antonov An-8, two Ilyushin Il-14s, four Ilyushin Il-62s, two Ilyushin Il-76s, two Ilyushin Il-86s, five Let L-410s, six Tupolev Tu-134s, 12 Tupolev Tu-154s, five Yakovlev Yak-40s and a Yakovlev Yak-42.

Following is a list of the accidents and incidents Aeroflot experienced during the decade.

List[edit]

Date Location Aircraft Tail number Airline division Aircraft damage Fatalities Description Refs
1990 Unknown An-2P CCCP-07308 Krasnoyarsk W/O 5/5 Mid-air collision. [9]
13 January 1990 Soviet UnionPervouralsk Tu-134A CCCP-65951 North Caucasus W/O 27/71[nb 1] The aircraft was en route a domestic scheduled TyumenUfa passenger service as Flight 6246 at 10,600 metres (34,800 ft) when smoke in the rear cargo hold prompted a fire warning in both engines, probably due to a short circuit of the electrical wiring. The flightcrew made an emergency descent, and the airplane forced landed on snowy fields, 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) away from Pervouralsk. [10][11]:33[12]
20 February 1990 Soviet UnionŠiauliai An-2R CCCP-56472 Lithuania W/O Unknown Crashed. [13]
16 March 1990 Soviet UnionVershino-Darasunsky An-28 CCCP-28702 East Siberia W/O 0 Hard landing. [14]
27 March 1990 AfghanistanKabul Il-76MD CCCP-78781 Uzbekistan W/O 11/11 The aircraft, on loan from the Soviet Air Force, was operating a Kokand-Kabul cargo service. At 5,400 m (17,700 ft), while on approach to Kabul, air traffic control ordered the pilot to discontinue the approach. The flaps and landing gear were retracted, yet the approach was continued. The aircraft stalled and crashed. [15][16]
2 June 1990 Soviet UnionKenkiyak An-24B CCCP-46551 North Caucasus W/O 0/33 A hard landing caused the nosegear to broke up. The aircraft overran the runway and was destroyed by fire. [17]
12 June 1990 AfghanistanKabul Il-76MD CCCP-86905 Uzbekistan W/O 0/10 Forced landing at Kabul Airport, after it was struck by a missile at 25,500 feet (7,800 m). [18]
30 June 1990 Soviet UnionYakutsk Il-62M CCCP-86456 Moscow W/O 0/109 Overran the runway upon landing at Yakutsk Airport due to an incorrect setting of the thrust reversers in two of the engines. [19]
19 July 1990 Unknown An-2 CCCP-40861 Yakut W/O Unknown Crashed into mountainous terrain. [20]
1 August 1990 Soviet UnionAgdam Yak-40 CCCP-87453 Armenia W/O 46/46[nb 2] Struck a mountain at 2,520 metres (8,270 ft) in cloudy conditions, 22 kilometres (14 mi) west of Stepanakert, during approach to Stepanakert Airport inbound from Yerevan. [11]:34[21]
12 August 1990 Unknown An-2 CCCP-62407 Yakut W/O Unknown Crashed into a forest. [22]
18 August 1990 Soviet UnionRushan An-28 CCCP-28761 Tajikistan W/O Unknown Hard landing. [23]
9 September 1990 Soviet UnionPavlodar Yak-40 CCCP-87451 Kazakhstan W/O 0 CCCP-87914 ran off the runway upon landing at Pavlodar Airport, and collided with CCCP-87451, breaking it up. [24][25]
Yak-40K CCCP-87914 W/O 0/22
12 September 1990 Soviet UnionRushan Il-14P CCCP-41803 Central W/O 0 Belly-landed on a glacier, 353 kilometres (219 mi) off Mirny Ice Station. [26]
14 September 1990 Soviet UnionSverdlovsk Yak-42 CCCP-42351 North Caucasus W/O 4/128 Broke up after it struck trees on approach to Koltsovo Airport, inbound from Volgograd on a domestic scheduled passenger service as Flight 8175. [11]:34[27][28]
12 October 1990 Soviet UnionOdessa L-410UVP CCCP-67331 Ukraine W/O 0/15 Hard landing at Odessa Airport. [29]
2 November 1990 Soviet UnionNyurba An-26B CCCP-26038 East Siberia W/O Unknown Crashed upon landing. [30]
17 November 1990 CzechoslovakiaVelichovky Tu-154M CCCP-85664 International W/O 0/6 The aircraft was flying an EuroairportSheremetyevo cargo service, when a fire broke out at 10,600 metres (34,800 ft), prompting the flightcrew to make an emergency landing. [31]
20 November 1990 Soviet UnionKutaisi Tu-154B-1 CCCP-85268 Georgia W/O 0/171 The aircraft failed to get airborne on takeoff from Kutaisi Airport due to overloading, overrunning the runway. [32]
21 November 1990 Soviet UnionYakutsk Il-62 CCCP-86613 International W/O 0/109 Made a long landing at Yakutsk Airport; the thrust reversers were not used and the emergency brakes were applied instead, yet too late, making the airplane to run off the runway, going down into a ravine. [33]
14 December 1990 Soviet UnionShakhtersk An-24B CCCP-47164 Far East W/O 0/43 Undershot the runway on landing. [34]
1991 Soviet UnionMirny Ice Station Il-14 CCCP-41807 Unknown W/O Unknown Unknown [35]
4 March 1991 Soviet UnionLeningrad An-24 Unknown Unknown Minor 1/26 While en route from Kotlas to Leningrad, the aircraft was hijacked by a male hijacker who demanded to be taken to Sweden. At Pulkovo Airport, the hijacker released the hostages, but refused to surrender. The grenade he carried with him exploded; he later died from the injuries he received. [36]
23 March 1991 Soviet UnionNavoi An-24RV CCCP-46472 Uzbekistan W/O 34/63 Overran the runway on landing at Navoiy Airport, hitting a heap of iron and concrete, breaking up and catching fire. [37][38]
23 May 1991 Soviet UnionLeningrad Tu-154B-1 CCCP-85097 Leningrad W/O 15/181 Hard landing short of the runway at Pulkovo Airport. The main starboard undercarriage collapsed, causing the break up of the airframe. Two people were killed on the ground. The aircraft was operating a Sukhumi-St. Petersburg service as Flight 8556. [39][40]
25 June 1991 Soviet UnionRakovka An-2 Unknown Unknown W/O 3/3 Control was lost and the aircraft crashed. [41]
25 June 1991 Unknown An-2 CCCP-31423 Latvia W/O 3/3 Destroyed by fire after crashing in the Ural region, within the Kazakh SSR territory. [42][43]
30 June 1991 Soviet UnionYartsevo An-2 CCCP-62475 Unknown W/O 2/2 Crashed during climbout and was destroyed by fire. The aircraft had been stolen. [44][45]
15 July 1991 Soviet UnionUray An-2TP CCCP-01494 Tyumen W/O 1/9 Crashed 2 kilometres (1.2 mi) out of Uray while attempting a forced landing, following an engine failure shortly after takeoff from Uray Airport. [46][47]
21 August 1991 Soviet UnionPoliny Osipenko L-410UVP CCCP-67091 Far East W/O 0 Aborted takeoff. [48]
27 August 1991 Soviet UnionOff Guriev L-410UVP CCCP-67099 Kazakhstan W/O 0/6 Forced landing, 42 kilometres (26 mi) out of Guriev. [49]
16 September 1991 Soviet UnionLensk An-74 CCCP-74002 Unknown W/O 13/13 Destroyed by fire when it lost height and crashed, shortly after takeoff from Lensk Airport. The aircraft was overloaded and the flight crew had prematurely retracted the flaps. Due to operate the second leg of a cargo Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky–Lensk–OmskKiev service. [50]
27 September 1991 Soviet UnionMagadan L-410UVP CCCP-67538 Yakut W/O 0 Premature retracion of the landing gear, during the takeoff run at Magadan Airport. [51]
3 October 1991 AngolaCazombo An-12BP CCCP-11120 International W/O 0 At Cazombo Airport, the propellers touched the ground when the main starboard landing gear got stuck in a hole and broke. [52]
23 October 1991 Soviet UnionShelopugino An-28 CCCP-28924 East Siberia W/O 0/13 Hard landing. [53]
7 November 1991 Soviet UnionMakhachkala Yak-40 CCCP-87526 North Caucasus W/O 34/34 Crashed into mountainous terrain, 22 kilometres (14 mi) away from Makhachkala, on approach to Makhachkala Airport, inbound from Elista. [54]
8 November 1991 Soviet UnionBatagay Yak-40 CCCP-79948 Yakut W/O Unknown Destroyed by fire while undergoing repairs. [55]
16 November 1991 Soviet UnionAmderma An-12 Unknown Yakut W/O 20/20 Crashed upon landing at Amderma Airport in bad weather. [56][57]
21 November 1991 Soviet UnionKhodzavend Yak-40 Unknown Azerbaijan W/O 20 Crashed en route under unspecified circumstances. [56]
26 November 1991 Soviet UnionBugulma An-24RV CCCP-47823 Privolzhsk W/O 42/42[nb 3] Crashed 800 metres (2,600 ft) out of Bugulma Airport, on approach, following an aborted go-around, likely because of icing on the stabilizer. [56][58]
8 December 1991 Unknown An-2 CCCP-33137 Yakut W/O Unknown Landed on rough terrain. [59]
Collapse of the USSR
3 January 1992 TajikistanLyakhsh An-28 CCCP-28706 Unknown W/O 0 Undershot the runway on landing. [60]
24 January 1992 Georgia (country)Batumi Tu-134A CCCP-65053 Georgia W/O 0 Overran the runway on landing at Chorokh Airport. [61]
22 March 1992[nb 4] RussiaOff Nizhneyansk An-30 CCCP-30002 Central W/O 10/10 Broke up in-flight at 17,700 feet (5,400 m), owing to a pilot error, while en route a domestic scheduled ChokurdahTiksi passenger service, disintegrating and crashing 53 kilometres (33 mi) west of Nizhneyansk. [62][63][64]
30 March 1992 IndiaSwarupnagar An-26 CCCP-26154 Unknown W/O 0/7 Forced landed following fuel exhaustion. [65]
June 1992 RussiaBratsk Tu-154B-1 CCCP-85282 Ural W/O 0/0 Destroyed by fire while refuelling at Bratsk Airport. [66]
June 1992 RussiaBratsk Tu-154B-1 CCCP-85234 Privolzhsk W/O 0/0 Destroyed by fire while refuelling at Bratsk Airport. [67]
7 June 1992 RussiaMoscow Tu-154 CCCP-26154 Russian International Airlines None 1/115 The aircraft was hijacked while en route from Grozny to Moscow. The hijacker, who demanded to be taken to Turkey, was killed by security forces at Vnukovo Airport. [68]
21 June 1992 RussiaPoltavskiy[disambiguation needed] An-2R CCCP-32544 Kazakhstan W/O Unknown Unknown [69]
3 July 1992 RussiaSosnovyy An-2R CCCP-40237 Kazakhstan W/O Unknown Crashed. [70]
8 July 1992 RussiaUkrainsky An-2R CCCP-07816 Central W/O Unknown Crashed. [71]
23 August 1992 SwitzerlandZurich Tu-154M CCCP-85670 Russian International Airlines W/O 0/145 The aircraft was completing a non-scheduled international Milan–Zurich passenger service as Flight 2267. The approach to Zurich Airport was abandoned due to inclement weather, and one of the wings struck an antenna. The crew managed to land the airplane safely. [72]
27 August 1992[nb 5] RussiaIvanovo Tu-134A CCCP-65058 Central W/O 84/84 The aircraft was completing a domestic scheduled Donetsk–Ivanovo passenger service as Flight 2808, when it hit trees on approach to Ivanovo Airport in rain and mist and crashed. [6][73]
29 August 1992 UkraineKharkov Tu-134A-3 CCCP-65810 Georgia W/O Unknown Overran the runway at Kharkov Airport following a long landing. [74]
21 September 1992 RussiaKalga Airstrip An-2PF CCCP-32596 East Siberia W/O Unknown Crashed 11 kilometres (6.8 mi) away from the Kalga Airstrip. [75]
1 October 1992 RussiaMoscow Il-62M RA-86703 Unknown W/O 0 Destroyed by fire while refuelling at Domodedovo Airport. [76]
13 October 1992 RussiaVladivostok Tu-154B-2 CCCP-85528 Belarus W/O 0/67 Overran the runway at Vladivostok Airport as it failed to get airborne. [77]
14 October 1992 KazakhstanKostanay An-2R CCCP-07840 Kazakhstan W/O 0/3 Crashed. [78]
5 December 1992 ArmeniaYerevan Tu-154A CCCP-85105 Armenia W/O 0/154 Veered off the runway upon landing at Yerevan Airport. [79]
30 January 1993 Unknown An-2R CCCP-40479 Yakut W/O Unknown Ended up upside down after crashing into snow. [80]
26 September 1993 RussiaNovoalekseevskaya An-2R RA-68150 North Caucasus W/O Unknown Crashed. [81]
22 December 1993 RussiaOff Uray An-2TP RA-01410 Tyumen W/O 0/10 Forced landed 190 kilometres (120 mi) away from Uray. [82]
25 December 1993 RussiaGrozny Tu-154B-2 RA-85296 Unknown W/O 0/172 Nosegear collapsed upon landing at Grozny Airport. [83]
8 February 1994 RussiaAnadyr An-12B CCCP-11340 Privolzhsk W/O 0/11 Overran the runway on landing at Anadyr Airport. [84]
24 February 1994 RussiaNalchik An-12BP RA-11118 Unknown W/O 13/13 Crashed 4.5 kilometres (2.8 mi) short of the runway, on approach to Nalchik Airport, after control was lost, probably due to stalling over icing conditions on the horizontal stabilizer. [85]
8 March 1994 IndiaDelhi Il-86 RA-86119 Russian International Airlines W/O 8 Destroyed by fire when it was hit by a crashing Boeing 737-200 that was being flown for training purposes at Indira Gandhi International Airport. [86][87][88]
23 March 1994 RussiaMezhdurechensk A310-300 F-OGQS Russian International Airlines W/O 75/75 The aircraft was operating an international scheduled Moscow–Hong Kong passenger service as Flight 593, when it crashed en route near Mezhdurechensk, after the auto-pilot partially shut off when the captain's son was allowed to sit in the pilot seat and handle the controls. [89][90]
7 May 1994 RussiaArkhangelsk Tu-134A-3 RA-65976 Unknown W/O 0/62 Landed at Talagi Airport with the main starboard landing gear retracted, veering to the right and coming to rest off the runway. [91]
24 May 1994 RussiaOktyabrsky[disambiguation needed] An-2P RA-07730 Unknown W/O Unknown Crashed following an oil leak. [92]
25 June 1994 RussiaKirensk An-2P RA-70263 East Siberia W/O 0/8 Unknown [93]
14 July 1994 RussiaBlagoveshchensk L-410UVP RA-67470 Far East W/O 0/14 One of the main landing gears ran into a ditch while taxiing at Blagoveshchensk Airport. [94]
17 July 1994 UkraineKherson An-24B RA-46575 Unknown W/O 0/32 Premature retraction of the undercarriage while running for takeoff at Kherson Airport. Due to operate an international scheduled Kherson–Moscow passenger service as Flight 86. [95][96]
11 December 1994 RussiaGrozny Tu-134A-3 RA-65858 North Caucasus W/O 0/0 Destroyed at Grozny Airport during a Russian raid amid the First Chechen War. [97]
13 April 1995 RussiaGugal-Buga An-2R Unknown Unknown W/O Unknown Crashed. [98]
16 June 1995 RussiaKherpuchi An-2P RA-07743 Unknown W/O 13/14 The aircraft departed Kherpuchi and was due to operate a domestic scheduled passenger service, when it crashed into trees, 22 kilometres (14 mi) out of the city, while attempting to return to the aerodrome of departure, amid worsening weather conditions. [99]
28 November 1995 RussiaMakovskoye An-2R RA-07419 Unknown W/O Unknown Crashed. [100]
7 December 1995 RussiaGrossevichi Tu-154B RA-85164 Aeroflot Khabarovsk Airlines W/O 98/98 Suddenly banked right while en route the first leg of a domestic scheduled Yuzhno-SakhalinskKhabarovskUlan-Ude–Novosibirsk passenger service as Flight 3949, at an altitude of 9,600 metres (31,500 ft), starting an uncontrollable dive and crashing 50 kilometres (31 mi) west of Grossevichi. [5][101]
8 October 1996 ItalySan Francesco al Campo An-124-100 RA-82069 Unknown W/O 4/23 Struck trees and houses following a go-around, with the flaps at take-off position. The aircraft was leased by Aeroflot and was being ferried empty to Torino from Moscow as Flight 9981. [102][103][104]
1998 RussiaMoscow Il-86 RA-86080 Russian International Airlines W/O 0 Hard landing. [105]
11 November 1998 United StatesAnchorage Il-62M RA-86564 Russian International Airlines W/O 0/12 An Asiana Airlines Boeing 747-400 damaged both the starboard wing and the tail of the aircraft as it was standing at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport. [106]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Figures for both the occupants of the airliner and the fatalities vary.[10][11]:33
  2. ^ Both the number of casualties and the number of occupants aboard are in discrepancy.[11]:34[21]
  3. ^ There exists a discrepancy over the death toll, as it was claimed it rose to 42 —37 passengers and a crew of 5—,[56] or 41 —37 passengers and a crew of 4—,[58]
  4. ^ Figures for both the date of occurrence and the number of fatalities are in discrepancy.[62][63]
  5. ^ The date of occurrence is discrepant.[6][73]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "CIS authorises new operator licenses" (PDF). Flight International: 10. 11 July 1992–17 July 1992. Archived from the original on 24 April 2012. Retrieved 24 April 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  2. ^ "World Airline Directory–Aeroflot - Soviet Airlines" (PDF). Flight International: 32. 25 March 1992–31 March 1992. Retrieved 23 April 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  3. ^ Duffy, Paul (4 September 1991–10 September 1991). "Changing the face of Aeroflot" (PDF). Flight International: 22. Retrieved 23 April 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  4. ^ "All change at Aeroflot" (PDF). Flight International: 47–48. 20 October 1993–26 October 1993. Retrieved 24 April 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  5. ^ a b Accident description for RA-85164 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 April 2012.
  6. ^ a b c Accident description for CCCP-65058 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 27 April 2012.
  7. ^
  8. ^
  9. ^ Accident description for CCCP-07308 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 March 2012.
  10. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-65951 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 March 2012.
  11. ^ a b c d e "1990 world airline safety – Fatal accidents: scheduled passenger flights" (PDF). Flight International: 33 – 34. 16 January 1991 – 22 January 1991. Retrieved 14 March 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  12. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-134А Волгоградского ОАО в районе г.Первоуральск" [Accident Tu-134 Pervouralsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 8 August 2012. 
  13. ^ Accident description for CCCP-56472 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 March 2012.
  14. ^ Accident description for CCCP-28702 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2014.
  15. ^ "1990 world airline safety – Fatal accidents: non-passenger flights" (PDF). Flight International: 34. 16 January 1991 – 22 January 1991. Retrieved 14 March 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  16. ^ Accident description for CCCP-78781 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 October 2012.
  17. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46551 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 March 2012.
  18. ^ Accident description for CCCP-86905 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 8 March 2012.
  19. ^ Accident description for CCCP-86456 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 9 March 2012.
  20. ^ Accident description for CCCP-40861 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 9 March 2012.
  21. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-87453 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 9 March 2012.
  22. ^ Accident description for CCCP-62407 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 March 2012.
  23. ^ Accident description for CCCP-28761 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 March 2012.
  24. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87451 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 October 2014.
  25. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87914 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 March 2012.
  26. ^ Accident description for CCCP-41803 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 March 2012.
  27. ^ Accident description for CCCP-42351 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 March 2012.
  28. ^ "Катастрофа Як-42 Волгоградского ОАО в а/п Кольцово" [Accident Yak-42 Sverdlovsk] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 8 August 2012. 
  29. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67331 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 March 2012.
  30. ^ Accident description for CCCP-26038 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 March 2012.
  31. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85664 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 March 2012.
  32. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85268 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 March 2012.
  33. ^ Accident description for CCCP-86613 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 March 2012.
  34. ^ Accident description for CCCP-47164 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 13 March 2012.
  35. ^ Accident description for CCCP-41807 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 March 2012.
  36. ^ Hijacking description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 March 2012.
  37. ^ Accident description for CCCP-46472 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 March 2012.
  38. ^ Velovich, Alexander (15 May 1991 – 21 May 1991). "Soviet civil aviation faces fares/fuel ferment" (PDF). Flight International (Moscow): 11. Retrieved 14 March 2012. The worst accident was on 23 March in Navoee in the Central Asian Republic of Uzbekistan, when the crew of four and 30 passengers on an Antonov An-24 regional airliner died.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  39. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85097 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 14 March 2012.
  40. ^ "Катастрофа Ту-154Б-1 Ленинградского УГА в а/п Пулково" [Accident Tu-154B-1 Pulkovo] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 18 October 2012. 
  41. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 March 2012.
  42. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 March 2012.
  43. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-2 Латвийского УГА в Зеленовском районе Уральской области" [Accident An-2 Ural region] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 25 August 2014. 
  44. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 March 2012.
  45. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-2 а/к Красноярскавиа в районе Ярцево" [Accident An-2 Yartsevo] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 25 August 2014. 
  46. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 March 2012.
  47. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-2ТП Тюменского УГА близ Урая" [Accident An-2TP Urai] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 18 October 2012. 
  48. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67091 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 March 2012.
  49. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67099 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 March 2012.
  50. ^ Accident description for CCCP-74002 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 March 2012.
  51. ^ Accident description for CCCP-67538 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 March 2012.
  52. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11120 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 March 2012.
  53. ^ Accident description for CCCP-28924 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 March 2012.
  54. ^ Accident description for CCCP-87526 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 March 2012.
  55. ^ Accident description for CCCP-79948 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 March 2012.
  56. ^ a b c d "Airline safety review – Fatal accidents: regional and commuter operations" (PDF). Flight International: 22. 29 January 1992 – 4 February 1992. Retrieved 16 March 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  57. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 March 2012.
  58. ^ a b Accident description for CCCP-47823 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 March 2012.
  59. ^ Accident description for CCCP-33137 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 March 2012.
  60. ^ Accident description for CCCP-28706 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 19 March 2012.
  61. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65053 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 19 March 2012.
  62. ^ a b Accident description for RA-30002 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 19 March 2012.
  63. ^ a b "AIRLINE SAFETY REVIEW – FATAL ACCIDENTS: REGIONAL AND COMMUTER OPERATIONS" (PDF). Flight International: 29. 27 January 1993 – 2 February 1993. Retrieved 19 March 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  64. ^ "New CIS airspace agreement signed" (PDF). Flight International: 9. 3 June 1992 – 9 June 1992. Retrieved 19 March 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  65. ^ Accident description for CCCP-26154 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 March 2012.
  66. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85282 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 March 2012.
  67. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85234 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 March 2012.
  68. ^ Hijacking description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 March 2012.
  69. ^ Accident description for CCCP-32544 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 March 2012.
  70. ^ Accident description for CCCP-40237 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 20 March 2012.
  71. ^ Accident description for CCCP-07816 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 March 2012.
  72. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85670 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 March 2012.
  73. ^ a b "AIRLINE SAFETY REVIEW – FATAL ACCIDENTS: SCHEDULED PASSENGER FLIGHTS" (PDF). Flight International: 29. 27 January 1993 – 2 February 1993. Retrieved 24 September 2011.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  74. ^ Accident description for CCCP-65810 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 March 2012.
  75. ^ Accident description for CCCP-32596 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 March 2012.
  76. ^ Accident description for RA-86703 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 March 2012.
  77. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85528 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 March 2012.
  78. ^ Accident description for CCCP-07840 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 March 2012.
  79. ^ Accident description for CCCP-85105 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 21 March 2012.
  80. ^ Accident description for CCCP-40479 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 March 2012.
  81. ^ Accident description for RA-68150 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 March 2012.
  82. ^ Accident description for RA-01410 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 March 2012.
  83. ^ Accident description for RA-85296 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 22 March 2012.
  84. ^ Accident description for CCCP-11340 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 March 2012.
  85. ^ Accident description for RA-11118 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 March 2012.
  86. ^ Accident description for RA-86119 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 March 2012.
  87. ^ Accident description for VT-SIA at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 6 September 2011.
  88. ^ "SAFETY CURTAIN" (PDF). Flight International: 30. 20 July 1994 – 26 July 1994. Retrieved 10 September 2011. An airline training flight in a Boeing 737-220 ended in disaster at Delhi International Airport, India, when its wreckage hit an Aeroflot-Russian International Airlines (ARIA) Ilyushin Il-86 on the parking ramp. The Il-86 was destroyed and servicing personnel and airport employees killed.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  89. ^ Accident description for F-OGQS at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 26 March 2012.
  90. ^ "75 Dead in a Crash Of a Russian Airbus On Hong Kong Run". The New York Times. 23 March 1994. Archived from the original on 31 March 2012. Retrieved 31 March 2012. 
  91. ^ Accident description for RA-65976 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 March 2012.
  92. ^ Accident description for RA-07730 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 March 2012.
  93. ^ Accident description for RA-70263 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 March 2012.
  94. ^ Accident description for RA-67470 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 March 2012.
  95. ^ Accident description for RA-46575 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 March 2012.
  96. ^ "Авария Ан-24Б а/к Быково-авиа в а/п Херсон" [Accident An-24 Kherson] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 26 August 2014. 
  97. ^ Accident description for RA-65858 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 March 2012.
  98. ^ Accident description at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 March 2012.
  99. ^ Accident description for RA-07743 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 April 2012.
  100. ^ Accident description for RA-07419 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 April 2012.
  101. ^ "Romanian An-24 crashes in Italy" (PDF). Flight International: 7. 20 December 1995–2 January 1996. Archived from the original on 27 April 2012. Retrieved 27 April 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  102. ^ Accident description for RA-82069 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 15 April 2012.
  103. ^ Spinelli, Andrea; Duffy, Paul (16 October 1996–22 October 1996). "An-124 crashes on approach to Turin" (PDF). Flight International: 9. Archived from the original on 27 April 2012. Retrieved 27 April 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  104. ^ "Катастрофа Ан-124-100 'Руслан' а/к Аэрофлот в Турине" [Accident An-124-100 Turin] (in Russian). airdisaster.ru. Retrieved 18 October 2012. 
  105. ^ Accident description for RA-86080 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 April 2012.
  106. ^ Accident description for RA-86564 at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 23 April 2012.