Aerolíneas Argentinas accidents and incidents

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For accidents and incidents related to Aerolíneas Argentinas' subsidiary Austral Líneas Aéreas, see Austral Líneas Aéreas.
Aerolíneas Argentinas accidents and incidents
Aerolineas Argentinas Comet Groves.jpg
An Aerolíneas Argentinas Comet 4, similar to the one involved in the accident of Flight 322, occurred on 23 December 1961, is seen here at Idlewild Airport in 1965. The airline lost three of these aircraft between August 1959 (1959-08) and December 1961 (1961-12).

Aerolíneas Argentinas was established by the Argentine government in May 1949 (1949-05).[1] Shortly after the carrier started revenue flights in December 1950 (1950-12)[2] it experienced its first deadly accident, when a Douglas C-47A crashed en route to Buenos Aires from Mar del Plata, killing 17 of the 18 occupants.

Following is a list of accidents and incidents experienced by Aerolíneas Argentinas. According to the Aviation Safety Network, as of July 2011 there have been 12 deadly accidents, totalling 335 fatalities.[3] The deadliest accident occurred in 1961, with a death toll of 67. The latest accident involving fatalities took place in 1970. The company ranks among the safest airlines in the world.[4]

Aerolíneas Argentinas has written off 28 aircraft; nine Douglas C-47As, four Avro 748s, three Comet 4s, two Boeing 737s, two Douglas DC-6s, two Convair CV-240s, two Fokker F-28s, one Boeing 707, one Douglas DC-4, one Douglas C-54, and one McDonnell Douglas MD-88.

List[edit]

Date Location Aircraft Tail number Aircraft damage Fatalities Description Refs
12 June 1950 ArgentinaBuenos Aires Douglas C-47A LV-ACL W/O 0 Overturned on landing at Ezeiza Airport. [5]
30 December 1950 ArgentinaSantiago del Estero[nb 1] Douglas C-47A LV-ACH W/O 17/18 Crashed while en route a domestic scheduled Mar del PlataBuenos Aires passenger service. [6]
26 March 1951 ArgentinaRío Grande Douglas C-47A LV-ACY W/O 13 The aircraft had just departed from Río Grande Airport bound for Buenos Aires when it crashed. Eleven of twenty occupants aboard perished in the accident, plus 2 people on the ground. [7]
3 June 1951 ArgentinaPuerto Deseado Douglas C-47A LV-AGE W/O 0 Overran the runway and came to rest into a ditch at Puerto Deseado Airport. [8]
21 June 1951 ArgentinaPuerto Deseado Douglas C-47B LV-ADG Repaired 2 Overshoot the runway on landing at Puerto Deseado Airport and hit a military truck, killing two occupants and injuring other two. Everybody aboard the aircraft survived. [9]
17 June 1953 ArgentinaCórdoba Douglas C-54A LV-ABQ W/O 0/41 Crash-landed 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) north of Córdoba while on approach to Pajas Blancas Airport, inbound from Salta on a domestic scheduled passenger service. [10]
23 April 1954 ArgentinaSierra del Vilgo Douglas C-47A LV-ACX W/O 25/25 The airplane was due to operate a domestic scheduled CórdobaMendoza route when crashed into mountainous terrain, within the Córdoba Province territory, after a diversion to La Rioja due to severe turbulence on the original flight path. [11]
16 October 1954 ArgentinaCapilla del Señor CV-240 LV-ADQ W/O 0/32 The aircraft was operating a scheduled Buenos Aires-Córdoba passenger service; bad weather forced it to land south-southwest of Capilla del Señor. [12]
20 May 1955 ArgentinaRío Gallegos Douglas C-47A LV-ACQ W/O 0/5 A fire broke out when the aircraft failed to get airborne during take-off at Río Chico Airport. The aircraft was operating a cargo service. [13]
16 July 1956 ArgentinaPavín Douglas C-47A LV-ACD W/O 18/18 Crashed 5 kilometres (3.1 mi) north-east of Pavín, Córdoba Province, as it descended below the minimun prescribed altitude on approach to Río Cuarto Airport inbound from Buenos Aires. [14]
11 January 1957 ArgentinaBuenos Aires Viking Unknown Unknown 18 Crashed. [15]
8 December 1957 ArgentinaBolívar DC-4 LV-AHZ W/O 61/61 Flight 670 was bound for San Carlos de Bariloche Airport from Ministro Pistarini International Airport when it crashed en route 25 kilometres (16 mi) southeast of Bolívar, under extreme weather conditions. [16][17]
10 June 1958 BrazilIlha Grande DC-6 LV-ADV W/O 0/22 Force-landed on a beach after the failure of two engines. The aircraft was operating a scheduled international Río de Janeiro–Buenos Aires passenger service. [18]
15 May 1959 ArgentinaMar del Plata Douglas C-47A LV-AFW W/O 18/18 The aircraft was due to operate the second leg of a domestic scheduled Ministro Pistarini International Airport–Mar del Plata AirportComandante Espora Airport passenger service as Flight 672, when it crashed into the sea, 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) off the coast, shortly after takeoff. [19]
14 July 1959 ArgentinaSantiago del Estero Douglas C-47A LV-ACM W/O 0/10 Belly landing. [20]
27 August 1959 ParaguayAsunción Comet 4 LV-AHP W/O 2/50 Crashed 9 kilometres (5.6 mi) away from Silvio Pettirossi International Airport, on final approach. A crew member and a passenger died. [21][22][23]
12 December 1959 ArgentinaMendoza CV-240 LV-ADM W/O 0/32 A loss of hydraulic pressure prompted the flightcrew to return to El Plumerillo Airport. On its way back to the airport, the aircraft force-landed in a vineyard near Mendoza. [24]
20 February 1960 ArgentinaBuenos Aires Comet 4 LV-AHO W/O 0/6 Hard landing at Ezeiza Airport during a training flight. [22][25]
7 September 1960 UruguaySalto DC-6 LV-ADS W/O 31/31 The aircraft was operating a scheduled Asunción–Buenos Aires service as Flight 205 when it suddenly crashed in a field, 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) east-northeast of Salto. [26][27][28]
9 July 1961 ArgentinaPardo DC-6 LV-ADW W/O 67/67 Broke up and crashed 12 kilometres (7.5 mi) west of Pardo, Buenos Aires, because of severe turbulence encountered during climbout. Due to operate a scheduled Buenos Aires–Comodoro Rivadavia domestic passenger service as Flight 644. The accident remains the deadliest one in the carrier's history. [29][30]
23 December 1961 BrazilSão Paulo Comet 4 LV-AHR W/O 52/52 Collided with an eucalyptus forest during initial climbout just after it departed from Viracopos-Campinas International Airport, and crashed. The aircraft was operating an international scheduled Buenos Aires–São PauloPort of SpainNew York City passenger service as Flight 322. [22][31]
28 September 1966 Falkland IslandsStanley DC-4 LV-AGG Unknown 0/50 Bound for Río Gallegos from Buenos Aires, the aircraft was hijacked by 19 extremists that intended to carry out a symbolical invasion to the Malvinas. Peronist militants masterminded the hijacking under the name “Plan Cóndor” (English: Condor plan). The aircraft was diverted and forced to land at the Stanley racecourse. Members of the Royal Marines as well as civilians were taken as hostages. The hijackers surrendered to a priest the next day, were sent back to Argentina, and imprisoned. [32][33][34][35]
15 July 1969 ArgentinaBahía Blanca HS-748 Srs. 1 LV-IEV W/O 0/39 Touched down off the runway in bad visibility at Comandante Espora Airport. [36][37]
27 November 1969 ArgentinaSanta Rosa HS-748 Srs. 1 LV-HHI W/O 0/28 Ended up in a paddock when it landed 3 kilometres (1.9 mi) short of the runway threshold at Santa Rosa Airport. [38][39]
4 February 1970 ArgentinaLoma Alta HS-748 Srs. 1 LV-HGW W/O 37/37 The aircraft was operating a scheduled Asunción–FormosaCorrientesRosarioBuenos Aires-Aeroparque passenger service as Flight 707 when it crashed into the ground near Loma Alta, Chaco, while on its third leg, after the pilots lost control of the aircraft during severe turbulence due to a thunderstorm. [40][41]
19 December 1970 ArgentinaSarmiento HS-748 Srs. 1 LV-HHH W/O 0 Unknown [42]
15 November 1975 ArgentinaConcordia F28-1000 LV-LOB W/O 0/60 Hit trees on approach to Concordia Airport inbound from Buenos Aires, 4 kilometres (2.5 mi) short of the runway. The crew managed to land the aircraft safely, but the nose gear and the fuselage resulted damaged beyond economical repair. [43][44][45]
27 January 1986 ArgentinaBuenos Aires Boeing 707-320C LV-JGR W/O 0/5 Overran the runway on landing in poor weather at Ezeiza Airport. The aircraft was completing a São Paulo–Buenos Aires freighter service. [46][47]
26 September 1988 ArgentinaUshuaia Boeing 737-200 LV-LIU W/O 0/62 Flight 648 was a domestic scheduled Buenos Aires–Bahía Blanca–Río Grande–Ushuaia passenger service that landed at the final destination airport with excessive speed, veered off the runway, slid down a slope for 2 metres (6 ft 7 in), and came into rest in shallow waters. [48][49]
5 January 1990 ArgentinaVilla Gesell F28-4000 LV-MZD W/O 0/90 Destroyed by fire following a runway overrun after an over fast touchdown. The aircraft was completing a scheduled Buenos Aires to Villa Gesell passenger service. [50][51]
14 February 1992 United StatesLos Angeles Boeing 747-200B Unknown None 1/356 Shrimp contaminated with cholera was distributed on Flight 386, which was bound to Los Angeles from Buenos Aires via Lima. One of the passengers died from the illness. [52][53]
20 November 1992[nb 2] ArgentinaSan Luis Boeing 737-200C LV-JNE W/O 0/113 Overran the runway when it aborted takeoff following the burst of a tyre at the San Luis Airport, catching fire. Due to operate a scheduled San Luis–Buenos Aires passenger service as Flight 8524. [54][55]
24 February 1999 ArgentinaBuenos Aires MD-88 LV-VBY W/O 0 Destroyed by hangar fire at Aeroparque Jorge Newbery. [56][57]

Footnotes[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ This is an unlikely location for a flight path between Mar del Plata and Buenos Aires.
  2. ^ A discrepancy exists on whether the incident occurred on 20 November,[54] or 21 November.[55]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "World Airline Survey – Aerolineas Argentinas". Flight International: 551. 13 April 1967. Archived from the original on 3 May 2012. Retrieved 5 October 2012. 
  2. ^ "World Airline Directory – Aerolineas Argentinas". Flight International: 48. 20 March 2001 – 26 March 2001. Archived from the original on 5 October 2012. Retrieved 5 October 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  3. ^ "Accident record for Aerolíneas Argentinas". Aviation Safety Network. 16 July 2011. Retrieved 17 July 2011. 
  4. ^ "World's safest airlines – Aerolineas Argentinas". news.com.au. Archived from the original on 25 March 2012. Retrieved 25 March 2012. 
  5. ^ Accident description for LV-ACL at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  6. ^ Accident description for LV-ACH at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 December 2011.
  7. ^ Accident description for LV-ACY at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 28 December 2011.
  8. ^ Accident description for LV-AGE at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  9. ^ Incident description for LV-ADG at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 December 2011.
  10. ^ Accident description for LV-ABQ at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  11. ^ Accident description for LV-ACX at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 December 2011.
  12. ^ Accident description for LV-ADQ at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 11 January 2012.
  13. ^ Accident description for LV-ACQ at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 18 July 2011.
  14. ^ Accident description for LV-ACD at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 December 2011.
  15. ^ "Brevities". Flight 2505 (71): 123. 25 January 1957. Archived from the original on 21 September 2013. An Aerolineas Argentinas Viking crashed at Buenos Aires on January 11. Twelve of the 28 passengers and six crew were killed. 
  16. ^ Accident description for LV-AHZ at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 December 2011.
  17. ^ "Timeline: Worst air accidents in Argentina". Buenos Aires Herald. 19 May 2011. Archived from the original on 29 September 2012. Retrieved 29 September 2012. 
  18. ^ Incident description for LV-ADV at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 January 2012.
  19. ^ Accident description for LV-AFW at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 December 2011.
  20. ^ Accident description for LV-ACM at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 February 2012.
  21. ^ Accident description for LV-AHP at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 30 June 2011.
  22. ^ a b c "Jet Safety and Charter Accidents". Flight International: 928 – 929. 14 June 1962. Archived from the original on 29 September 2012. Retrieved 29 September 2012. 
  23. ^ "Aerolineas Argentinas Accident". Flight: 104. 4 September 1959. Archived from the original on 29 September 2012. Retrieved 29 September 2012. One of Aerolineas Argentinas' three Comet 4s was badly damaged on August 26 when it made a forced landing in bad weather near Asuncion, Paraguay. The aircraft was carrying 54 passengers and a crew of 11 on a flight from Buenos Aires to New York via Asuncion. The commander, Capt. S. J. Llense, was killed and an elderly woman passenger died of shock. 
  24. ^ Incident description for LV-ADM at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 February 2012.
  25. ^ Incident description for LV-AHO at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 February 2012.
  26. ^ Accident description for LV-ADS at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 31 December 2011.
  27. ^ "AIR COMMERCE... – 1960 Safety Record" (pdf). Flight: 66. 13 January 1961. Retrieved 28 July 2011. 
  28. ^ "BREVITIES" (pdf). Flight: 485. 16 September 1960. Retrieved 1 May 2011. A DC-6 of Aerolineas Argentinas, one of five owned by the airline, crashed near Salto, Uruguay, on September 7, during a flight from Asuncion to Buenos Aires. All the occupants, 24 passengers and crew of six, lost their lives. 
  29. ^ Accident description for LV-ADW at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 30 December 2011.
  30. ^ "1961 ACCIDENT RECORD" (pdf). Flight: 523. 28 September 1961. Retrieved 5 June 2011. 
  31. ^ Accident description for LV-AHR at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 30 December 2011.
  32. ^ Incident description for LV-AGG at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 25 July 2011.
  33. ^ "Pensions for Argentine members of failed attempt to capture the Falklands in 1966". MercoPress. 22 July 2009. Archived from the original on 29 September 2012. Retrieved 29 September 2012. 
  34. ^ "40 years on Remembering the 1966 DC4 hijacking". MercoPress. 29 September 2006. Archived from the original on 29 September 2012. Retrieved 29 September 2012. 
  35. ^ "A brief history of the Falkland Islands | Part 5 – The Argentine Claim". falklands.info. Archived from the original on 29 September 2012. Retrieved 29 September 2012. 
  36. ^ Accident description for LV-IEV at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 January 2012.
  37. ^ "ACCIDENTS AND INCIDENTS: JULY" (pdf). Flight International: 234. 14 August 1969. Retrieved 5 June 2011. 
  38. ^ Accident description for LV-HHI at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 February 2012.
  39. ^ "AIR SAFETY | NON-FATAL ACCIDENTS – PUBLIC TRANSPORT AIRCRAFT 1969" (pdf). Flight International: 86. 15 January 1970. Retrieved 5 June 2011. 
  40. ^ Accident description for LV-HGW at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 30 December 2011.
  41. ^ "ACCIDENT AND INCIDENT REVIEW: February and March 1970" (pdf). Flight International: 619. 16 April 1970. Retrieved 17 July 2011. 
  42. ^ Accident description for LV-HHH at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 February 2012.
  43. ^ Accident description for LV-LOB at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 16 January 2012.
  44. ^ "Flight safety – Non-fatal incidents: Scheduled flights". Flight International: 184. 24 January 1976. Retrieved 2 June 2011. 
  45. ^ "Public-transport accidents". Flight International: 778. 27 November 1975. Archived from the original on 14 August 2012. Retrieved 14 August 2012. An F.28 of Aerolineas Argentinas, LV-LOB, crashed on the approach to Concordia airport on November 15. The aircraft, carrying 60 passengers and crew, hit trees six kilometres short of the runway while making a night approach during a thunderstorm. Three flight crew and three passengers were injured and the aircraft was severely damaged. 
  46. ^ Accident description for LV-JGR at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 February 2012.
  47. ^ "COMMERCIAL FLIGHT SAFETY – NON-FATAL ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS: NON-PASSENGER FLIGHTS" (pdf). Flight International: 27. 12 July 1986. Retrieved 2 June 2011. 
  48. ^ Accident description for LV-LIU at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 January 2012.
  49. ^ "COMMERCIAL FLIGHT SAFETY – NONFATAL ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS: SCHEDULED PASSENGER FLIGHTS" (pdf). Flight International: 56. 21 January 1989. Retrieved 1 June 2011. 
  50. ^ Accident description for LV-MZD at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 February 2012.
  51. ^ "CIVIL ACCIDENT REVIEW – NON-FATAL ACCIDENTS/INCIDENTS: SCHEDULED PASSENGER SERVICES" (pdf). Flight International: 35. 25 July 1990 – 25 July 1990. Retrieved 1 June 2011.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  52. ^ Nash, Nathaniel C. (10 March 1992). "Latin Nations Feud Over Cholera Outbreak". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 1 March 2012. 
  53. ^ Mydans, Seth (21 February 1992). "Cholera Kills One and Fells Many on Flight". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 1 March 2012. 
  54. ^ a b Incident description for LV-JNE at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 12 February 2012.
  55. ^ a b "Airline safety review – Non-fatal accidents/incidents: scheduled passenger flights". Flight International: 32. 27 January 1993 – 2 February 1993. Archived from the original on 29 September 2012. Retrieved 29 September 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  56. ^ Incident description for LV-VBY at the Aviation Safety Network. Retrieved on 4 January 2012.
  57. ^ "Airline safety review – Non-fatal accidents/incidents: Non-passenger flights". Flight International: 35. 28 July 1999 – 3 August 1999. Archived from the original on 29 September 2012. Retrieved 29 September 2012.  Check date values in: |date= (help)