Aetius (praetorian prefect)

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Aetius (fl. 419–425) was a politician of the Eastern Roman Empire, praefectus urbi of Constantinople and praetorian prefect of the East.

Life[edit]

Aetius was praefectus urbi of Constantinople. He is first attested in office on February 23, 419, when an old man called Cyriacus tried to kill him in the Great Church,[1] and again on October 4 of the same year, when he received a law preserved in the Codex Theodosianus.[2] He also received a law[3] dated to 409, but emended by scholars to 418, 420 or 422, in which he was to reduce the staff of the Great Church (this reduction has been suggested as a possible reason for the assassination attempt).[4] In 421 a large open-air water reservoir called "of Aetius" was built in Constantinople;[5] this Aetius might be the praefectus urbi, who could be still in office[4] as his successor, Florentius, is first attested in November 422.

A law addressed to him was issued on May 5, 425 that calls him a praetorian prefect;[6] it is not clearly stated if he was praetorian prefect of the East or of Illyricum, but the former is more probable.[4]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Chronicon Paschale, sub anno 419.
  2. ^ Codex Theodosianus, XIV, 6.5a, regarding the lime makers.
  3. ^ Codex Justinianus, I, 2.4a and IV, 63.5a
  4. ^ a b c Martindale.
  5. ^ Marcellinus Comes, sub anno 421.
  6. ^ Codex Theodosianus, XV, 4.1a, about the imperial images.

Sources[edit]

Preceded by
Ursus
Praefectus urbi of Constantinople
(418?-)419(-?421)
Succeeded by
Florentius
Preceded by
Asclepiodotus
Praetorian prefect of the East
425
Succeeded by
Hierius (I)