Aflatoun

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Aflatoun
Type Non-governmental organization
Founded 2005 by Jeroo Billimoria
in Amsterdam, Netherlands
Area served Worldwide
Focus(es) Child Social and Financial Education
Motto Separate fiction from fact. Explore, think, investigate and act.[1]
Website http://www.aflatoun.org

Aflatoun (Child Savings International) is a non-governmental organization focusing on educating children about their rights and responsibilities and managing financial resources through social and financial education. Headquartered in Amsterdam, Netherlands, Aflatoun currently works in 83 countries who are implementing the Aflatoun programme. Aflatoun is reaching 1 million children around the world and is helping over 400,000 of them save money and other resources.{{http://aflatoun.org/downloads/children-and-change-final-for-web.pdf}}

Social and financial education[edit]

Aflatoun provides children with social and financial education. Through balancing social learning and financial concepts, the Aflatoun programme empowers children to believe in themselves, know their rights and responsibilities, understand and practice saving and spending, and start their own enterprises.[1] These can include organizing social campaigns, setting up savings systems and starting small scale financial enterprises. Through the notion of Social & Financial Education, children are empowered to make a positive change in their lives and in their communities, with the aim of ultimately leading them to breaking the cycle of poverty in which many find themselves.

Background[edit]

The inspiration for Aflatoun comes from Jeroo Billimoria, an Indian national who grew up and worked among the street children of Mumbai.[1] Seeing that many of these children were quite entrepreneurial, she thought it important that children be able to understand their self-worth, rights, and be able to manage their own resources.

The Aflatoun concept was first tested in India 18 years ago, introducing financial concepts in a school-based child rights programme. Billimoria saw that the children reacted well to the games, activities and songs. Due to this success, other countries were approached to discuss whether a similar concept could bring the same benefits to their communities.[1]

In November 2005, the Aflatoun Network was formally launched in Amsterdam, Netherlands. A global initiative involving ten more countries began, and today Aflatoun is active in 28 countries. In March 2008, Aflatoun's worldwide campaign for Child Social and Financial Education was launched with the help of the Netherlands' Princess Maxima. It achieved its goals of reaching 75 countries and 1 million children by 2010.

Name and Character[edit]

The name Aflatoun was chosen by the children who first participated in the program in India and the character, a little fireball from outspace [sic?], is based on a Bollywood movie they liked.[1] Aflatoun was created to lead children through their learning journey and help to create emotional attachment between children and the program material. Thus, the Aflatoun character is the unifying symbol that brings together all the Aflatoun children around the world.[1]

Network[edit]

The Aflatoun Network is a participative and inclusive network of organizations who bring the programme to children. The Aflatoun programme is delivered by local partners at the country-level as they best understand the local context. They become the owners of the programme, contextualising the materials and training teachers. The Secretariat in Amsterdam serves as a resource centre for the partners to facilitate information flow and capacity building. Also included in the Aflatoun Network are stakeholders such as financial institutions, microfinance institutions, corporations, researchers, International non-governmental organizations, multilaterals and bilaterals, among others.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f Human Rights Education in Asian Schools, Volume Twelve, Asia-Pacific Human Rights Information Center, Osaka, Japan

External links[edit]