African-American Heritage Sites

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Capt. Charles Young

The National Park System preserves the history and contributions of African Americans and is part of the nation's history. Over the years, staff of the National Park Service has reflected the nation's social history. Among the first African Americans who influenced the course of the National Parks were:

  • Early Superintendents (not fully inclusive)
    • Charles Young: He served as an early Superintendent of Sequoia National Park in 1903. As a Captain in the 9th Cavalry Regiment, he was directed to take two troops of Buffalo soldiers to the Giants Grove of Sequioa and protect the trees and the park from damage. While there, the two companies completed construction of a road to the Giant's Grove, making public access possible..[1]
    • Robert Stanton, National Capital Parks (East) (1970–1971)[2]
    • Georgia Ellard, Rock Creek Park (1977–1988)[2]
    • Garry Traynham, Allegheny Portage (1990–1995)[2]
  • Deputy Directors
    • Donald Murphy, (2002–2005)[2]

Parks[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Sequoia National Park
  2. ^ a b c d e Historic Listing of National Park Service Officials, USDI, NPS, May 1, 1991, by Harold Danz. Updates after publication by Public Affairs.
  • National Park Service, Special Topic, Webpage, [1] and [2]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Savage, Beth L. (Ed.); African American Historic Places, National Register of Historic Places; National Park Service, Preservation Press, 1994