Afro-Arab

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Afro-Arab
السود العرب

Afro-Arab people.png Omar al-Bashir · Hassan Hakmoun · Raïs M'Bolhi · Bilal ibn Rabah

Yacine Brahimi · Sheba "Bilqis" · Hatem Trabelsi · Majed Abdullah
Ahmed Dokhi · Sidi Abdullahi · Zeinab Badawi · Anwar Sadat
Regions with significant populations
Languages
Varieties of Arabic
Religion
Muslim
Related ethnic groups
Black people  • Arab people

Afro-Arab (or Black Arab)[when defined as?]Is commonly used to describe Arabized black person or group (e.g. the Akhdam).[1][2] There are individuals and communities of Afro-Arabs in East Africa, West Africa, North Africa, the Near East and Western Europe.

"Afro-Arab" may also refer to the African Union's efforts to improve co-operation between African countries and those of the Arab world.[3]

Culture[edit]

In Eastern Arabia's Arab States of the Persian Gulf, descendants of Africans perform Liwa and Fann At-Tanbura music and dance.[4][5] The mizmar is also performed by Afro-Arabs in the Tihamah and Hejaz regions of Saudi Arabia.

In addition, Stambali of Tunisia and Gnawa music of Morocco are both ritual music and dances, which in part trace their origins to West African musical styles.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ al-Saadi, Yazan (May 29, 2012). "Arab-African Ties: Severing History". alakhbar. 
  2. ^ Gustavo Benavides, M. W. Daly, Religion and Political Power, SUNY Press, 1989, 84.
  3. ^ Sarah Grainger, Uganda celebrates Afro-Arab unity, BBC News, March 13, 2008
  4. ^ Africans in the Arabian Gulf, Afropop Worldwide.
  5. ^ Poul Rovsing Olsen, "La Musique Africaine dans le Golfe Persique", Journal of the International Folk Music Council, Vol. 19, (1967), pp. 28-36

External links[edit]