After-School All-Stars

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After-School All-Stars
Abbreviation ASAS
Formation 1992
Type Youth organization
Legal status Non-profit organization
Purpose Provide comprehensive after-schol programs that keep children safe and help them succeed in school and in life.
Headquarters Los Angeles
Location
  • Nationwide
Region served United States
CEO Ben Paul
Staff 4,645
Website as-as.org

After-School All-Stars (ASAS) is a national non-profit organization that partners with schools across the United States to expand the learning day for low-income children. Its mission is to provide comprehensive after-school programs that keep children safe and help them achieve in school and in life. [1] Currently, ASAS serves nearly 92,000 students on over 400 school sites in 14 regions across 10 states.[2]

History[edit]

ASAS history begins in Los Angeles, where, in 1991, ASAS founder Arnold Schwarzenegger was invited to serve as Executive Commissioner of the Inner City Games (ICG) by Daniel Hernandez of the Hollenbeck Youth Center. ICG was a city-wide health and fitness program designed to help at-risk youth develop self-esteem and a sense of personal value. The powerful impact ICG had on its young participants was unmistakable and inspired the creation of the Inner City Games Foundation (ICGF) in 1992.

Between 1992 and 2000, ICGF expanded to 15 additional cities across the country. Based on research, experience and dialogue with law-enforcement, it was clear that the after-school hours were when children needed ASAS most. ICGF transformed its model to provide after-school programming that was offered every day of the school year, supplemented with additional summer programming. In 2003, ICGF was renamed After-School All-Stars to reflect the significant enhancement of programming and holistic approach to extended-day learning. (Please see holistic education for more information)

ASAS currently serves over 92,000 low-income, at-risk youth at 400 Title I schools in 15 major cities across the country: Atlanta, Chicago, Columbus, Dallas, Dayton, Honolulu, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Orlando, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, and Toledo. 93% of ASAS students are minority, 86% qualify for the Federal Free and Reduced Lunch Program (see National School Lunch Act) and 62% are in the middle school grades.

[3][4] Together they championed a national effort found through the Inner-City Games Foundation established in 1995 [5]

General Information[edit]

For more than 20 years, After-School All-Stars has provided free, high-quality after-school programs to low-income, inner-city youth across the country. Now reaching 92,000 students on over 400 school sites, ASAS is raising the bar and helping students succeed in school and in life. Their goals for their All-Stars are the same goals that many parents have for their own children: to be healthy and active, to graduate high school and go on to college, to find a job that they love and to give back to their communities. ASAS achieves this by identifying and fueling students' individual passions, tying their interests to tailored academic support, enrichment and health and fitness programming.

After-School All-Stars gives its students a safe-haven during the “danger zone” hours of 3pm-6pm—the time of day when youth violence, drug use, and other delinquent behaviors are most likely to occur. By creating caring youth adult relationships and incorporating service learning into all that they do, they help their All-Stars gain the confidence, skills and role models they need to become leaders in their community.

ASAS is the largest school-based after-school program provider in the country. ASAS serves over 92,000 low-income, at-risk youth at 400 Title I schools in 14 major cities across the country: Atlanta, Chicago, Columbus, Dallas, Honolulu, Las Vegas, Los Angeles, Miami, New York, Orlando, San Antonio, San Diego, San Francisco, and Washington DC. 93% of ASAS students are minority, 86% qualify for the Federal Free and Reduced Lunch Program and 62% are in the middle school grades.

Program Details[edit]

Introduction to the program[edit]

Students who want to be a part of ASAS do not have to pay any annual fees or any dues at all. ASA focuses its effort on Title I schools. These are schools where "50% of students qualify for the Federal Free and Reduced Lunch Program". ASAS has about 367 chapters across the United States. Students never have to travel alone to a program and because programs are run as close to the schools as possible, otherwise transportation services are provided by ASAS.

Target Market[edit]

ASAS primarily serves children at the middle school level because it is usually the most neglected age group for after school programs. Most middle school students do not have the luxury of daycare services or after school activities and are often left with few to none safe activities to engage in after school from 3pm-6pm. Several studies have shown that if students are left alone and on their own during these hours, they are more likely to become involved with "gangs, crime, drugs and unsafe sex."

Solutions[edit]

ASAS provides solutions to help improve America's youth in cases of crisis. For example, when the obesity crisis in younger children became big in the United States, ASAS created the “Sports as a Hook” program. They have also attempted to respond to America’s high school drop out rate by launching programs like “We Are Ready” and “CampUs." They have even helped students become ready for the economic crisis with a program that was only created a few years ago, “CEO: Career Exploration Opportunities.”[6]

Demographics Served[edit]

After School All Stars serves over 92,000 underprivileged children in America.

Gender[edit]

The comparison of male to female is:

  • Female
    • 52%
  • Male
    • 48%

School Level[edit]

It serves elementary, middle and high school children:

  • Elementary
    • 33%
  • Middle School
    • 58%
  • High School
    • 9%

Ethnicity[edit]

ASAS also serves a variety of ethnicities:

  • African-American/Black
    • 25%
  • Asian-American
    • 4%
  • Latino/a
    • 58%
  • Pacific Islander
    • 2%
  • White
    • 9%
  • Other

Locations[edit]

ASAS has hundreds of chapters and these are the locations and important details of the cities ASAS is located in:

  • ASAS NATIONAL
    • 92,152 students, 367 sites
  • ASAS ATLANTA
    • 2,717 students, 15 schools
  • ASAS CHICAGO
    • 38,791 students, 173 schools
  • ASAS HAWAII
    • 2,028 students, 11 schools
  • ASAS LAS VEGAS
    • 5,236 students, 14 schools
  • ASAS LOS ANGELES
    • 17,877 students, 42 schools
  • ASAS NEW YORK
    • 2,215 students, 2 schools
  • ASAS NORTH TEXAS
    • 350 students, 2 school
  • ASAS OHIO
    • 886 students, 8 schools
  • ASAS ORLANDO
    • 2,239 students, 8 schools
  • ASAS SAN ANTONIO
    • 5,884 students, 28 schools
  • ASAS SAN DIEGO
    • 1,300 students, 9 schools
  • ASAS SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA
    • 2,227 students, 24 schools
  • ASAS SOUTH FLORIDA
    • 5,477 students, 32 schools
  • ASAS Washington, D.C.
    • 150 students, 1 schools[8]

Program Partners/Ambassadors[edit]

Some of the most important and influential brand ambassadors and partners that have helped ASAS through the years are:

References[edit]

External links[edit]