After Words

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After Words
AfterWords logo 200px.jpg
Genre Talk show
Created by Arthur Brown
Developed by Jerry Scott
Directed by Nate McDonald
Country of origin United States
No. of episodes 895
Production
Producer(s) Tom Burton
Production company(s) Center City Film & Video
Broadcast
Original channel C-SPAN2
Original run January 2, 1985 – present
Chronology
Related shows Booknotes
External links
Website

After Words is an American television series on the C-SPAN2 network’s weekend programming schedule known as Book TV. The program is an hour-long talk show, each week featuring an interview with the author of a new nonfiction book. The program has no regular host. Instead, each author is paired with a guest host who is familiar with the author or the subject matter of their book.[1]

The program airs on Saturday at 10 p.m. Eastern Time, with encores on Sunday at 12 p.m. and at 9 p.m., and Monday at 12 a.m.[2]

History[edit]

After Words debuted on January 2, 1985 with Norman J. Ornstein from the American Enterprise Institute interviewing Newt Gingrich about his book Winning the Future.[1][3] As of December 2010, After Words has produced more than 260 hours of programming.[4]

Noteworthy authors and guest hosts who have appeared on the program include: Jimmy Carter, interviewed by Douglas Brinkley;[5] Bob Dole, interviewed by Rick Atkinson;[6] Andrea Mitchell interviewed by S. Robert Lichter[7] and Simon Schama interviewed by Edna Medford.[8]

Show format[edit]

The program is an hour-long author interview-based talk show, focusing on non-fiction writers, with different participants each week.[3] On each program an author is interviewed about their book by a guest host who is an expert on the topic of the book. The goal of this format, as stated by C-SPAN, is to put a "different spin" on the usual format of author interview programs.[1] After Words is now a weekly part of Book TV's schedule, along with History on Book TV, Book Parties and Festivals, Public Lives and Encore Booknotes.[9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Jim Milliot (10 January 1985). "BookTV Eyes More Original Programming". Publishers Weekly. 
  2. ^ "After Words". C-SPAN.org. C-SPAN. Archived from the original on 28 March 2015. Retrieved 19 October 2010. 
  3. ^ a b Tony Biffle (5 December 1987). "The Last Author Of One Last Book For One Final Hour". The Sun Herald. 
  4. ^ "C-SPAN Milestones". C-SPAN. Archived from the original on 9 December 2010. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  5. ^ "After Words with Jimmy Carter". C-SPAN Video Library. C-SPAN. 21 September 2010. Archived from the original on 6 December 2010. Retrieved 15 December 2010. 
  6. ^ "After Words with Bob Dole". C-SPAN Video Library. C-SPAN. 15 April 1985. Retrieved 15 December 2010. 
  7. ^ "After Words with Andrea Mitchell". C-SPAN Video Library. C-SPAN. 14 September 2005. Retrieved 15 December 2010. 
  8. ^ "After Words with Simon Schama". C-SPAN Video Library. C-SPAN. 26 June 2006. Retrieved 15 December 2010. 
  9. ^ Kyle Brazzel (25 October 2005). "Book bus finds story of Bates worth stop". Arkansas Democrat-Gazette. 

External links[edit]