Agamemnon (comics)

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Agamemnon
AgamemnonC.jpg
Agamemnon, bound in chains by the rest of the Pantheon
Publication information
Publisher Marvel Comics
First appearance As hologram:
Incredible Hulk #376 (Dec 1990)
Actual appearance:
Incredible Hulk #401
Created by Peter David
Dale Keown
In-story information
Team affiliations Pantheon
Notable aliases James, Vali Halfling
Abilities Immortality

Agamemnon is a fictional character in Marvel Comics.

Fictional character biography[edit]

Agamemnon is a half-human and half-Asgardian god.[1] He was born immortal, and though he never physically aged beyond the age of 16 (but employed holograms to appear as a very old man), the Pantheon members are all his descendants: Achilles, Ajax, Andromeda, Atalanta, Cassiopea, Delphi, Hector, Jason, Paris, Perseus, Prometheus, and two characters named Ulysses. He recruited the Pantheon into a team, stationed in the Nevada desert based headquarters called The Mount.[volume & issue needed] Hela the Norse goddess of death once encountered him and called him by the name Vali Halfling.[volume & issue needed] In the Norse myths there were two gods named Vali. One was the son of Loki and Sigyn and the other was the son of Odin and the giantess Rind. He would later be clarified to be the former.[2]

Agamemnon confers with Prometheus about the Hulk,[3] and then invited the Hulk to join the Pantheon.[4] While the Hulk was part of the Pantheon, Agamemnon sends them on various missions, including: sending Pantheon members to save Thunderbolt from a life of crime;[5] sent the Hulk to Israel to bring Achilles and Max Meer to the Pantheon;[6] and directs the Pantheon operation against Dracchiss.[7]

Agamemnon's sanctum is invaded by the villainous Leader. Agamemnon pretends to ally himself with the Leader against HYDRA,.[8] He then gives the Hulk permission to stop the Leader.[9] Agamemnon asks the Hulk to lead the Pantheon in a planned absence, revealing his true appearance as a young teenager. He explains that immortality hit at that point in his life, that his older facade was just an illusion.[10] Agamemnon then leaves the Pantheon to travel through America.[11]

Betrayal[edit]

Agamemnon is taken prisoner by Pantheon forces based on evidence he has betrayed the group. The Pantheon believes that he has gotten most of his power from alien forces in return for allowing said aliens to take whichever Pantheon soldiers they wish to. Agamemnon soon reveals that he enjoys building up powerful social structures and destroying them. Agamemnon summons the Forever Knights, past Pantheon soldiers who have fallen in battle, in a bid for escape. During the battle he falls from a large height while battling Atalanta and apparently perishes.[12]

Heroic Age[edit]

Vali Halfling appears again years later, when Amadeus Cho takes over the Olympus Group. He reveals that Hebe's ambrosia is one of the four elements needed to ascend to the power-level of the Skyfathers. It is clarified that Vali is the son of Loki from myth, as well as that his rebirth was due to the rebirth of the Norse Gods. Atalanta appears in a supporting role, claiming the Pantheon now supports Vali's schemes to depose the Skyfathers. His plans are thwarted by Cho and Vali is dumped into the realm of Sekhmet.[13]

X-Factor[edit]

Agamemnon takes an interest in the offspring of the mutant Wolfsbane and the Asgardian wolf prince Hrimhari, believing that the child will have significant abilities as a hybrid of human mutant and god;[14] the child is also a distant relative of Agamemnon's, due to Hrimhari being a descendant of the Fenris Wolf,[15] who was also fathered by Loki. Agamemnon imprisons Wolfsbane as she goes into labor, but when he attempts to reason with the newborn godling, he is attacked and apparently disembowelled by the vicious and feral wolf-child. However, when Wolfsbane is rescued by her allies in X-Factor Investigations, Agamemnon's body is gone.[14]

Powers and abilities[edit]

Agamemnon is an immortal, but does not otherwise appear to have superhuman powers. He is a genius and a master in analyzing and forecasting the future development of social structures, as well as a master battle strategist. He is also an excellent hand-to-hand combatant and in excellent physical condition.

Agamemnon also has access to the highly advanced technology produced by the Pantheon scientists and craftsmen. Since the revelation that he is the son of Loki, he has also demonstrated knowledge of magic and spellcasting; though not appearing to have any innate magic ability of his own, he has shown skill in employing magical artifacts and rituals.[13][14]

References[edit]

  1. ^ DeFalco, Tom (2006). The Marvel Encyclopedia. Dorling Kindersley. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-7566-2358-6. 
  2. ^ Heroic Age: Prince of Power #2
  3. ^ Incredible Hulk #376
  4. ^ Incredible Hulk #381
  5. ^ Incredible Hulk Annual #17
  6. ^ Incredible Hulk #386-387
  7. ^ Incredible Hulk Annual #18
  8. ^ Incredible Hulk #398-399
  9. ^ Incredible Hulk #400
  10. ^ Incredible Hulk #401
  11. ^ Incredible Hulk #402
  12. ^ Hulk #425
  13. ^ a b Heroic Age: Prince of Power #1-4
  14. ^ a b c X-Factor #224
  15. ^ Thor Annual #12

External links[edit]