Agang South Africa

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Agang South Africa
English name Build South Africa
President Mike Tshishonga (acting)[1]
Chairperson Mike Tshishonga
Secretary-General Sam Njela
Spokesperson John McConnacchie
Slogan Restoring the Promise of Freedom
Founded 18 February 2013 (2013-02-18)
Headquarters PO Box 31817, Braamfontein, 2017
Ideology Anti-corruption politics
Progressivism
Political position Centre-left
Colours Green
National Assembly seats
2 / 400
Website
agangsa.org.za
Politics of South Africa
Political parties
Elections

Agang South Africa is a South African political party, formed by anti-apartheid activist Mamphela Ramphele on 18 February 2013,[2][3] although the party claims on its website that it was founded on 22 June 2013,[4] which was the date of the party's first official congress.[5][6][7]

The party encourages reforms towards direct governance, striving to "build a stronger democracy in which citizens will be at the centre of public life";[8] and intends to challenge the governing African National Congress in the 2014 general election.[9] Agang is a Sotho–Tswana word meaning "let us build".[10]

History[edit]

On 28 January 2014, the Democratic Alliance (DA) announced that Ramphele had accepted an invitation to stand as its presidential candidate in the 2014 general election,[11][12][13] and the DA and Agang were set to merge.[14][15] On 31 January 2014, Ramphele stated that she would not take up DA party membership and would remain the leader of Agang, resulting in confusion.[16] On 2 February 2014, Helen Zille stated that Ramphele had reneged on her agreement to stand as the DA's presidential candidate.[17] Ramphele subsequently apologised for the reversal of her decision, saying that the timing was not right as the reaction to it had shown people were unable to overcome race-based party politics.[18] On 9 February 2014, following statements by Helen Zille that donor funding issues were behind the failed merger, Ramphele named business magnate Nathan Kirsh as a funder of Agang and said he would continue to fund the new party.[19][20]

In the 2014 election, the party received 52,350 votes, or 0.28% of the total, and won two seats in the National Assembly of South Africa.[21] Following internal conflict within the party, Ramphele announced her withdrawal from politics on 8 July 2014.[1][22]

Ideology and formation[edit]

The following aims are listed on the party's website:[23]

  • changing from the current system of proportional representation and party lists to a system of constituency-based representation, which South Africa had before 1994
  • increasing salaries of public servants
  • reducing employment in mining and agriculture, through modernisation, and increasing employment in the service sector
  • improving education by unspecified means
  • adjusting foreign policy to that which creates jobs and boosts the economy.

Leadership team[edit]

Agang SA national leadership team as announced at the launch of the party’s manifesto in Atteridgeville, outside Pretoria on 8 March 2014.

  • Mamphela Ramphele – President (left July 2014)[1]
  • Andries Tlouamma – Deputy President
  • Mike Tshishonga – Chairperson
  • Sam Njela – Secretary-General
  • Johanna Mphogo – Deputy Secretary-General
  • Garth Towell – Treasurer
  • John McConnachie – National Spokesperson and Policy Convenor
  • Andrew Gasnolar – Deputy National Spokesperson and Deputy Policy Convenor
  • Nyameka Mguzulo – Youth Forum Convenor
  • Angela Pitsi – Women Convenor
Agang SA's logo from time of founding until adoption of current logo

Election results[edit]

National elections[edit]

Election Votes % Seats
2014[24] 52,350 0.28% 2

Provincial elections[edit]

Election Eastern Cape Free State Gauteng Kwazulu-Natal Limpopo Mpumalanga North-West Northern Cape Western Cape
% Seats % Seats % Seats % Seats % Seats % Seats % Seats % Seats % Seats
2014[24] 0.11% 0/63 0.20% 0/30 0.42% 0/73 - - 0.36% 0/49 0.13% 0/30 0.44% 0/33 - - 0.30% 0/42

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Ndenze, Babalo (9 July 2014). "No tears as Ramphele quits party". Cape Times. SAPA. Archived from the original on 9 July 2014. Retrieved 9 July 2014. 
  2. ^ Agang South Africa: Video: Mamphele Ramphele announces launch of Agang, 18 February 2013
  3. ^ http://152.111.1.88/argief/berigte/beeld/2013/02/19/B1/2/tccramph.html
  4. ^ http://agangsa.org.za/pages/launch-of-agang
  5. ^ http://152.111.1.88/argief/berigte/beeld/2013/06/26/B1/2/mlTutu.html
  6. ^ The Citizen (21 June 2013). "Agang SA to launch political party". thecitizen.co.za. 
  7. ^ BBC (22 June 2013). "South African new party Agang to challenge ANC". bbc.co.uk. 
  8. ^ Agang South Africa | About Agang
  9. ^ Anti-Apartheid Leader Launches New Party in South Africa
  10. ^ Smith, David (18 February 2013). "Mamphela Ramphele launches challenge to South Africa's ANC". The Guardian. Retrieved 28 February 2014. 
  11. ^ "Ramphele is joining us – DA source". IOL. 28 January 2014. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  12. ^ "Ramphele: This is an astonishing moment for SA". News24. 28 January 2014. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  13. ^ "Ramphele announced as DA presidential candidate". Mail & Guardian. 28 January 2014. Retrieved 28 January 2014. 
  14. ^ Davis, Rebecca (28 January 2014). "DA-Agang: Dial M for Merger". IOL. Retrieved 29 January 2014. "Zille said that the two parties were establishing a 'joint technical committee to manage the integration of the DA and Agang SA structures and volunteers'." 
  15. ^ Ensor, Linda (28 January 2014). "Mamphela Ramphele joins DA as presidential candidate". Business Day. Retrieved 29 January 2014. "Dr Ramphele said she believed the merger was a historic moment" 
  16. ^ Ramphele, Mamphela (31 January 2014). "I won't be accepting DA membership on Monday". Politicsweb. Retrieved 31 January 2014. 
  17. ^ Zille, Helen (2 February 2014). "Mamphela Ramphele has reneged on our agreement". Politicsweb. Retrieved 2 February 2014. 
  18. ^ "Ramphele says she made the right decision with DA candidacy". Times LIVE. 3 February 2014. Retrieved 3 February 2014. 
  19. ^ Seale, Lebogang (5 February 2014). "Donor funding 'a danger to democracy'". The Star. Retrieved 9 February 2014. 
  20. ^ Aboobaker, Shanti (9 February 2014). "Exposed: DA-Agang mystery funder". Sunday Independent. Retrieved 9 February 2014. 
  21. ^ "Battered but unbowed, Agang enter parliament". eNCA. Retrieved 11 May 2014. 
  22. ^ "Ramphele quits party politics". News24. SAPA. 8 July 2014. Archived from the original on 8 July 2014. Retrieved 8 July 2014. 
  23. ^ "Agang’s Aims". agangsa.org.za. 21 June 2013. 
  24. ^ a b "2014 National and Provincial Elections Results – 2014 National and Provincial Election Results". IEC. Retrieved 11 May 2014.