Ageliferin

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Ageliferin
Ageliferin.png
Identifiers
CAS number 117417-64-8 N
PubChem 11169518
ChemSpider 9344613 N
ChEMBL CHEMBL502866 N
Jmol-3D images Image 1
Properties
Molecular formula C22H24Br2N10O2
Molar mass 620.30 g mol−1
Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C (77 °F), 100 kPa)
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Infobox references

Ageliferin is a chemical compound produced by some sponges. It was first isolated from Caribbean and then Okinawan marine sponges in the genus Agelas.[1][2][3] It often co-exists with the related compound sceptrin and other similar compounds. (See also Agelas clathrodes and Agelas conifera.) It has antibacterial properties and can cause biofilms to dissolve.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Rinehart, Kenneth L, et al. (1990). "Bioactive Compounds from Aquatic and Terrestrial Sources". Journal of Natural Products 53 (4): 771–792. doi:10.1021/np50070a001. 
  2. ^ Keifer, Paul A., et al. (1991). "Bioactive Bromopyrrole Metabolites from the Caribbean Sponge Agelas conifera". J. Org. Chem. 56 (9): 2965–75. doi:10.1021/jo00009a008. 
  3. ^ Kobayashi, Junichi, et al. (1990). "Ageliferins, potent actomyosin ATPase activators from the Okinawan marine sponge Agelas sp.". Tetrahedron 46 (16): 5579–86. doi:10.1016/S0040-4020(01)87756-5. 
  4. ^ Laura Sanders (2009). "Sponge’s secret weapon restores antibiotics’ power: Bacteria treated with compound lose their resistance". Science News 175 (6): 16.