Agha Saeed

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Dr. Agha Saeed is the Founder and Chairman of American Muslim Alliance and a lecturer in the Program in Asian Studies at California State University, East Bay. Dr. Saeed earned his B.A. in Political Science from University of Punjab, Pakistan and M.A. and Ph.D. in Rhetoric from University of California at Berkeley. He was also an exchange scholar at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. In 2000, controversial remarks by Saeed in support of the Palestinian people led Hillary Clinton to refund $50,000 in campaign donations from American Muslim Alliance members.[citation needed]

Organizational Affiliations[edit]

  • Founder & National Chair, American Muslim Alliance [1993 - to date]. American Muslim Alliance (AMA) was founded in 1994 to provide civic education and leadership training to American Muslims. AMA is a national political organization with 101 chapters in 31 states, and plans to have chapters in all 435 U.S. Congressional districts.
  • Founder and President of the Pakistan American Democratic Forum. 1982 to 2003
  • Coordinator, American Muslim Task Force on Civil Rights and Elections (2003 – to date)
  • Coordinator, California Civil Rights Alliance (2003 – to date)
  • Founder and Chair, American Muslim Political Coordination Council (1998–2001)

Major Accomplishments[edit]

Dr. Saeed spearheaded the campaign against the USA Patriot Act that led to the California State Resolution SJR10 against the USA PATRIOT act. In 2000 and 2004, Dr. Saeed was strategic force behind the creation of a first and second Muslim Bloc vote. He is the currently chair of American Muslim Taskforce on Civil Rights and Elections (AMT), which is the nationwide coalition of Muslim Organizations.

Dr Saeed is the producer and host of Global Forum TV which is focused on examining major world issues from a Muslim perspective.

Publications[edit]

Dr. Saeed is the author of the following two forthcoming books:

  • Pakistan in its Own Mirror: Elite Autobiographies and National Consciousness
  • Syncretic Self-Understanding of South Asian Muslims: Texts and Contexts.

References[edit]

External links[edit]