Agrius convolvuli

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Agrius convolvuli
Agrius convolvuli MHNT dos.jpg
Agrius convolvuli MHNT
Agrius convolvuli MHNT ventre.jpg
Agrius convolvuli MHNT
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Class: Insecta
Order: Lepidoptera
Family: Sphingidae
Genus: Agrius
Species: A. convolvuli
Binomial name
Agrius convolvuli
(Linnaeus, 1758)[1]
Synonyms
  • Sphinx convolvuli Linnaeus, 1758
  • Herse convolvuli
  • Protoparce orientalis Butler, 1876
  • Sphinx abadonna Fabricius, 1798
  • Sphinx distans Butler, 1874
  • Sphinx patatas Ménétriés, 1857
  • Sphinx pseudoconvolvuli Schaufuss, 1870
  • Sphinx roseafasciata Koch, 1865
  • Sphinx convolvuli alicea Neuburger, 1899
  • Sphinx convolvuli batatae Christ, 1882
  • Sphinx convolvuli nigricans Cannaviello, 1900
  • Agrius convolvuli aksuensis O. Bang-Haas, 1927
  • Agrius convolvuli fuscosignata Tutt, 1904
  • Agrius convolvuli grisea Tutt, 1904
  • Agrius convolvuli ichangensis Tutt, 1904
  • Agrius convolvuli intermedia Tutt, 1904
  • Agrius convolvuli javanensis Tutt, 1904
  • Agrius convolvuli major Tutt, 1904
  • Agrius convolvuli minor Tutt, 1904
  • Agrius convolvuli obscura Tutt, 1904
  • Agrius convolvuli suffusa Tutt, 1904
  • Agrius convolvuli tahitiensis Tutt, 1904
  • Agrius convolvuli unicolor Tutt, 1904
  • Agrius convolvuli variegata Tutt, 1904
  • Agrius convolvuli virgata Tutt, 1904
  • Herse convolvuli extincta Gehlen, 1928
  • Herse convolvuli marshallensis Clark, 1922
  • Herse convolvuli peitaihoensis Clark, 1922
  • Herse convolvuli posticoconflua Bryk, 1946
  • Protoparce convolvuli fasciata Pillich, 1909
  • Protoparce convolvuli indica Skell, 1913

The Convolvulus Hawk-moth, Agrius convolvuli, is a large hawkmoth. It is common throughout Europe, Africa[2] and Australia.[3]

Description and habits[edit]

The wingspan is 80–105 mm. This hawkmoth's basic coloration is in grayish tones, but it has delicate colored regular spots on both sides of the abdomen, in black, pink and white rows.

Its favorite time is around sunset and during the twilight, when it is seen in gardens hovering over the flowers. This moth is very attracted to the lights, so it is often smashed by cars in highways. Its caterpillars eat the leaves of the Convolvulus, therefore its Latin name "convolvuli". Other recorded foodplant include a wide range of plants in the Araceae, Convolvulaceae, Leguminosae and Malvaceae families. It can be a pest of cultivated Ipomoea. It feeds on the wing and has a very long proboscis (longer than its body) that enables it to feed on long trumpet like flowers such as Nicotiana sylvestris.[4]

The caterpillars can be in a number of different colours. As well as brown (pictured below) they have been seen in bright green and black.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "CATE Creating a Taxonomic eScience - Sphingidae". Cate-sphingidae.org. Retrieved 2011-11-01. 
  2. ^ "JSTOR: Lepidoptera". Links.jstor.org. Retrieved 2011-11-01. 
  3. ^ "Ozanimals". Ozanimals. Retrieved 2011-11-01. 
  4. ^ Michael Chinery, Collins Guide to the Insects of Great Britain and Western Europe