Ahmad Shah Ahmadzai

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Ahmad Shah Ahmadzai
Prime Minister of Afghanistan
In office
1992 – 26 June 1996
President Burhanuddin Rabbani
Preceded by Arsala Rahmani (Acting)
Succeeded by Mohammad Rabbani
Personal details
Born 1944
Malang, Afghanistan
Political party Islamic Dawah Organisation of Afghanistan

Ahmad Shah Ahmadzai (Pashto: احمد شاه احمدزی‎ - b. 1944) is an Afghan politician. He served as the prime minister of Afghanistan from 1992 to 1996. He is an ethnic Pashtun from the Ahmadzai sub-tribe.

Biography[edit]

Ahmad Shah Ahmadzai was born in Malang village of Khaki Jabbar district, Kabul. He studied engineering at Kabul University and then worked in the agriculture ministry. In 1972 he received a scholarship to study in the United States, at Colorado State University. He received a master's degree in 1975 and became a professor at King Faisal University in Saudi Arabia.

Following the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan in 1979, Ahmadzai returned to his country to join the mujahideens. He was a close associate of Burhanuddin Rabbani but then left his group and joined Abdul Rasul Sayyaf's Islamic Dawah Organisation of Afghanistan movement. Following the end of communist rule in 1992, Ahmadzai was the deputy head of his party and later served as a minister in the Afghan government. He served as interior and construction minister and then became prime minister in which he served in until June 26, 1996, when more of the former militias which had been fighting for control of Kabul made an agreement to form a national unity government to stop the advancing Taliban.

Ahmadzai left Afghanistan in September 1996 to attend the united nation conference in New York, just before the Taliban captured Kabul. He lived in exile in Istanbul, Turkey, and London, England before he returned to Afghanistan in 2001 after the fall of Taliban.

Ahmadzai was an independent candidate in the 2004 Afghan presidential election supporting an Islamic system of government. He was confident about his chances of winning, but later boycott the election due to some allegations, however his total vote were announced only 0.8% of the total votes counted.

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