Aiguille Blanche de Peuterey

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Aiguille Blanche de Peuterey
Blanche de Peuterey.JPG
The north face of the Aiguille Blanche de Peuterey with its three summits, seen from the Pointe Helbronner
Elevation 4,112 m (13,491 ft)
Location
Location Aosta Valley, Italy
Range Graian Alps
Coordinates 45°49′28″N 6°52′58″E / 45.82444°N 6.88278°E / 45.82444; 6.88278Coordinates: 45°49′28″N 6°52′58″E / 45.82444°N 6.88278°E / 45.82444; 6.88278
Geology
Type Granite
Climbing
First ascent 31 July 1885 by Henry Seymour King with guides Emile Rey, Ambros Supersaxo and Aloys Anthamatten
Easiest route South-east ridge (D+)

The Aiguille Blanche de Peuterey (4,112 m) is a mountain of the Mont Blanc massif in Italy. It is considered the most difficult and serious of the alpine 4000-m mountains.

There are three tops to the mountain:

  • Pointe Güssfeldt (4,112 m)
  • Pointe Seymour King (4,107 m)
  • Pointe Jones (4,104 m)

The three tops are named after Paul Güssfeldt, Henry Seymour King and Humphrey Owen Jones.

Ascents[edit]

The highest point, Pointe Güssfeldt, was first climbed by Henry Seymour King with guides Emile Rey, Ambros Supersaxo and Aloys Anthamatten on 31 July 1885.

Peuterey ridge[edit]

Together with its neighbour – the Aiguille Noire de Peuterey (3,773 m) – the Aiguille Blanche forms part of the Peuterey ridge that leads, via the summit of the Grand Pilier d'Angle, to the summit of Mont Blanc. James Eccles, with guides Alphonse and Michel Payot, made the first ascent of the upper part of the ridge during their first ascent of Mont Blanc de Courmayeur on 31 July 1877.[1] The main ridge itself was first climbed via a couloir on the Brenva face by Paul Güssfeldt with Emile Rey, Christian Klucker and César Ollier on 15–19 August 1893 (the second ascent was a week later by Klucker and John Percy Farrar). The first ascent of the complete ridge including the Aiguille Noire de Peuterey (the Intégrale) was on 28–31 July 1934 by Adolf Göttner, Ludwig Schmaderer and Ferdinand Krobath.

Photo gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dumler, Helmut and Burkhardt, Willi P., The High Mountains of the Alps, London: Diadem, 1994, p. 193

External links[edit]