Aira, Kagoshima (Aira)

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This article is about a current city. For a former town, see Aira. There formerly was a town with the same English name in the same prefecture, see Aira, Kagoshima (Kimotsuki).
Aira
姶良市
City
Flag of Aira
Flag
Location of Aira in Kagoshima Prefecture
Location of Aira in Kagoshima Prefecture
Aira is located in Japan
Aira
Aira
Location in Japan
Coordinates: 31°45′N 130°46′E / 31.750°N 130.767°E / 31.750; 130.767Coordinates: 31°45′N 130°46′E / 31.750°N 130.767°E / 31.750; 130.767
Country Japan
Region Kyushu
Prefecture Kagoshima Prefecture
Government
 • Mayor Yoshihiro Sasayama (since April 2010)
Area
 • Total 231.32 km2 (89.31 sq mi)
Population (May 2010)
 • Total 74,611
 • Density 323/km2 (840/sq mi)
Time zone Japan Standard Time (UTC+9)
Symbols
- Tree Cinnamomum camphora
- Flower Prunus jamasakura
Address 25 Miyajima-cho, Aira-shi, Kagoshima-ken
899-5492
Phone number 0995-66-3111
Website www.city.aira.lg.jp

Aira (姶良市 Aira-shi?) is a city located in Kagoshima Prefecture, Japan. It is located west of Kirishima and north of Kagoshima.

The modern city of Aira was established on March 23, 2010, from the merger of the former town of Aira, absorbing the towns of Kajiki and Kamō (all from Aira District).

As of May 2010, the city has an estimated population of 74,611 and a population density of 323 persons per km². The total area is 231.32 km².

It is accessed with the Kyushu Expressway at interchange 25, the Kajiki Interchange and interchange 26, the Aira Interchange. The expressway passed through Aira, connecting Kagoshima to the west and Kirishima to the North. The interchange was first opened on December 13, 1973. There are five railway stations in the city. From east to west, Kajiki, Kinkō, Chōsa, Aira and Shigetomi stations serve the city. All of these stations belong to Nippō Main Line, and are operated by Kyushu Railway Company (JR Kyushu).

Aira's claim to fame is a stone gate in the village of Yamada which commemorates the victory of the Russo-Japanese War.

The plan for the merger of the three towns was defeated twice. Once in 2005 and again in 2008. These defeats were due to a debt in public finance and the number of seats in the city council. Finally, in 2009, town representatives compromised with these problems and the merger plan was accepted. Aira District will be left with one municipality.[1]

Aira and its surroundings as taken with a Nikon D3S from the International Space Station.[2]

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